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MICK HUME Finally a BBC boss admitted that stars make fun of impartiality towards social media


They are "addicted" to Twitter, the "most toxic" social media platform, and seem to care more about making their tweets "viral" than telling the truth.

No, that's not a description of irresponsible teenagers obsessed with smartphones.

It is an indictment of high-ranking BBC journalists who was explosively forwarded to a parliamentary committee this week by none other than the company's own director of editorial guidelines and standards, David Jordan.

It was a very satisfying, if absolutely stunning, moment for those of us who have been warning about the harmful effects of Aunt's recent bias for years.

In no uncertain words, Mr. Jordan told the Lords' Communications and Digital Committee that BBC journalists have committed "outrageous" social media policy violations that undermine their reputation for "impartiality and objectivity."

It is an indictment of high-ranking BBC journalists who was explosively forwarded to a parliamentary committee this week by none other than the company's own director of editorial guidelines and standards, David Jordan

Groupthink

He even wanted to reassure the committee that its news agents aren't all left-wing Guardian readers – though I'm curious to see how the dedicated Beeb team of "fact-checkers" tries to prove this controversial claim.

Of course, those of us living in the real world need not be told that BBC employees have often adopted a form of left-liberal groupthink.

For years we have been horrified to see how BBC journalists' addiction to Twitter has widened the gap between the company and the licensees it is supposed to serve.

Mr. Jordan admitted that the BBC had problems tracking the rise in Euroscepticism and the growing concerns about immigration.

In other words, the BBC's deep-seated prejudices against the EU had blinded it to increasing popular support for Brexit and the loss of control over Britain's borders.

It may be unforgivable, but it is hardly surprising in itself.

By searching for validation on Twitter, the BBC employees restrict themselves to an echo chamber in which their worldview is reflected and strengthened by minorities

By searching for validation on Twitter, the BBC employees restrict themselves to an echo chamber in which their worldview is reflected and strengthened by minorities

After all, this is the case when reporters and news readers are more interested in promoting their own political inclinations and agendas and increasing their online followers than uncovering facts.

By searching for validation on Twitter, the BBC employees restrict themselves to an echo chamber in which their worldview is reflected and strengthened by minorities.

According to his distorted narrative, Leave had to lose the EU referendum, Hillary Clinton was a mess for the US president and Boris risked being beaten up by Corbyn in the 2019 elections.

With such an unsurpassed ability to misread public opinion, it's clear that many of their journalists simply don't understand who their audience is.

By searching for validation on Twitter, the BBC employees restrict themselves to an echo chamber, which reflects and reinforces their worldview of minorities (file photo).

By searching for validation on Twitter, the BBC employees restrict themselves to an echo chamber, which reflects and reinforces their worldview of minorities (file photo).

How else can we explain the obvious disregard for social media impartiality by high-ranking journalists?

These rules stipulate that news agents may not “publicly disclose or disclose how they vote on politics or a“ controversial subject, ”or voice opinions.

Someone must have forgotten to name the well-known names who regularly tweet and retweet anti-tory and anti-Brexit posts.

One of the main culprits is BBC2 Newsnight presenter Emily Maitlis (last published salary: over £ 260,000), which has amassed almost 400,000 Twitter followers.

Only two months ago, Maitlis hit the headlines when she opened an episode of the news program with an exceptional editorial rant about Tory consultant Dominic Cummings' poorly advised trip to Durham during the ban.

Maitlis said that "Dominic Cummings has broken the rules, the country can see that and it is shocked that the government cannot."

Thousands of complaints later, the BBC admitted that the program had failed to meet its "standards of fair impartiality" and that Maitli's monologue was "more on the side of a newspaper" than "impartial broadcast programming".

Still, no one familiar with Maitlis’s track record on Twitter was shocked by her outbreak.

Ahead of last year's parliamentary elections, she retweeted posts criticizing Boris and the "bad party" conservatives.

Before the election, Edwards "liked" a message from the GMB union: "Vote Labor for the National Health Service".

Before the election, Edwards "liked" a message from the GMB union: "Vote Labor for the National Health Service".

Days before the election, Maitlis even tweeted a personal warning to her followers: "Don't underestimate the similarities between GBDone (Get Brexit Done) and MAGA (Make America Great Again) – they all work when repeated and sung – but never explained. "

It was a clear expression of contempt for voters who were supposedly stupid enough to be cheated by Boris or Donald Trump.

Ms. Maitlis in the Dock owns BBC News at Ten Presenter Huw Edwards (salary: over £ 490,000) with around 100,000 Twitter followers.

Before the election, Edwards "liked" a message from the GMB union saying "Vote Labor for the National Health Service".

He also liked a comment criticizing Boris Johnson's plan for Brexit.

Of course, the BBC isn't the only news organization whose worldview is dictated by Twitter.

Just this week, American columnist Bari Weiss left the New York Times in a devastating open letter warning that “Twitter is not in the New York Times imprint. But Twitter has become its ultimate editor. "

Respected

It was a bitter criticism of a respected "newspaper of records" by its own staff.

But in the end, every newspaper has to have editorial independence to say what it believes. It is up to the readers whether they buy it or not.

However, the BBC is not a newspaper. It is a public broadcaster that we pay for, whether we like it or not.

It is said to exist to promote honesty and truth, not to spread prejudice. No wonder that there is now a Defund the BBC campaign that condemns its results as "bright propaganda".

Neil is by far the BBC's most respected and feared forensic interviewer. But his failure to denounce Brexit and his role in Spectator magazine make him "none of us".

Neil is by far the BBC's most respected and feared forensic interviewer. But his failure to denounce Brexit and his role in Spectator magazine make him "none of us".

After the company's announcement yesterday that it was going to cut 520 jobs from the news business, I doubt that the left-liberal stars would have to worry much.

On the other hand, it was not surprising that another Twitter-friendly journalist, Andrew Neil (salary unknown), canceled his weekly political show.

Neil is by far the BBC's most respected and feared forensic interviewer. But his failure to denounce Brexit and his role in Spectator magazine make him "none of us".

The BBC's toxic confrontation with the Twitterati is a symptom of a far bigger problem in the Broadcasting House – that it is no longer the voice of the British people, but the middle-class remainer middle class.

Hostile

His prejudices affect all of his results, from the news to Countryfile, which recently announced that Britain's green and pleasant landscape is actually a hostile "white environment".

BBC comedy panel shows have become more of a grade propaganda show, and "woken up" stars are pampered and advertised regardless of what they say elsewhere.

And let's not forget that last week the BBC had the gall to announce plans to charge £ 75.50 a year for its TV license to over-75s it seems to despise (file photo)

And let's not forget that last week the BBC had the gall to announce plans to charge £ 75.50 a year for its TV license to over-75s it seems to despise (file photo)

Just last week, actress Maxine Peake played in her reprisals against Alan Bennett's Talking Heads, two weeks after she set up an anti-Semitic conspiracy theory, while Miriam Margolyes will return with her travel series shortly after doing so on Channel 4 & # 39; s The Last Leg announced she wanted the prime minister to die of coronavirus.

And let's not forget that last week the BBC had the gall to announce plans to charge £ 75.50 a year for its TV license to those over 75 it seems to despise.

In 1949, George Orwell painted in his dystopian novel Nineteen Eighty-Four a frightening portrait of a state machine dedicated to the party line parrot, based on the author's own experience of war with the BBC.

Over 70 years later, the company appears to have turned into its own "Woke" version of Big Brothers "Ministry of Truth" – where the importance of impartiality is almost lost.

  • Mick Hume is the author of Trigger Warning: Is The Fear Of Being Offensive Killing Free Speech ?, published by William Collins.

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