TECHNOLOGY

Michelin-starred double chef Sat Bains refuses to serve vegan food in his restaurant for £ 120 a head


The double Michelin star chef Sat Bains refuses to serve vegan food in his restaurant for £ 120 a head because it's a rip off.

  • Top chef Sat Bains says vegan food is the "biggest rip off" with cheap ingredients
  • He claims that there are certain nutritional needs that they don't meet in his Sat Bains restaurant
  • Bains & # 39; The Michelin-starred restaurant in Nottingham was voted the fourth best gourmet restaurant in 2018
  • He claims that customers visit the niche restaurant and know exactly what to expect

A Michelin star chef has refused to offer a vegan menu because he says it is the "biggest rip off" with "cheap" ingredients and is not good value for money.

The 48-year-old Sat Bains, who has been awarded two Michelin stars, offers a trial menu for GBP 120 per head with delicacies such as Wollaton Hall deer and partridge ragout, paired with earthy flavors such as truffles and lichen.

Michelin-starred chef Sat Bains (photo), 48, has refused to offer vegan food in his Sat Bains restaurant in Nottinghamshire because it is the "biggest rip off". He said: “You can't go to a heavy metal concert and expect classical music. It is my business and my business model to do what I want. I don't do vegan, halal or kosher & # 39;

Mr. Bains, who opened the restaurant almost 18 years ago, said: “There are not only 10 dishes on a menu – there is so much thought in every detail.

"We want to offer our customers the best possible food."

Customers visit the niche restaurant and know what to expect and what types of ingredients to use on the seven-course menu for £ 105 or ten courses for £ 120.

His gourmet restaurant (pictured) revolves around the game season. The seven-course meal costs £ 105 or ten courses at £ 120 and offers guests local Wollaton Hall deer and partridge ragouts

His gourmet restaurant (pictured) revolves around the game season. The seven-course meal costs £ 105 or ten courses at £ 120 and offers guests local Wollaton Hall deer and partridge ragouts

For this reason, the Great British Menu winner refuses to "go on certain diets", just as he "does not go to a vegan restaurant and ask for a steak".

He told the mirror: “The amount of research to get the same taste and texture as fat to get this luxurious mouthful is phenomenal.

“You can't go to a heavy metal concert and expect classical music. It is my business and my business model to do what I want. I don't do vegan, halal or kosher. & # 39;

Mr. Bains suggested that his restaurant be leaning back to prepare a dinner that was allergic to potato family vegetables.

The restaurant (pictured) would "never" be vegan, according to the Great British Menu winner. He suggested that the chefs lean back to provide a night shadow allergy to certain vegetables, and "almost give up" the cooking style

The restaurant (pictured) would "never" be vegan, according to the Great British Menu winner. He suggested that the chefs lean back to provide a night shadow allergy to certain vegetables, and "almost give up" the cooking style

He admitted that "it is so hard to be right" and "almost give up the style of the restaurant" to meet their needs.

The Michelin-starred double chef is not, and never would be, a vegan specialist.

It comes a year after Trip Advisor's restaurant has been voted the 10th best gourmet restaurant in the UK for the Travelers & # 39; Choice Restaurants Awards 2019.

Sat Bains was previously recognized as the best in the country and number four in the world at the 2018 awards.

The restaurant was the first in the English city to win a Michelin star in 2003 – and has won another ever since.

The career of the Michelin-starred chef Sat Bains

Celebrated chef Sat Bains came from humble beginnings after attending a catering course at Derby College when he was 18.

He is a second generation British Sikh heir whose parents settled in Derby in the 1960s. His father ran newsagents and licenses and had a significant impact on his work ethic – when he saw that the Michelin-starred chef was making paper rounds at 4:30 p.m. at the age of 13.

Mr. Bains earned a City & Guilds qualification before working under Mick Murphy.

Raymond Blanc hired Bains as one of 16 members to open the first Le Petit Blanc in Oxford in 1996.

After six months, he moved to the French restaurant L & # 39; Escargot in London.

He returned to Nottingham, where he applied for the Roux Scholarship in 1999.

Mr. Bains mingled with other trained chefs such as Rene Redzepi and got his first impression of working in a Michelin-starred restaurant – Le Jardin des Sens in Paris.

He had won the scholarship after losing his job in an art gallery café, which left him and his partner Amanda desperate for the title.

After the win, he was offered a job at the Hotel des Clos in Nottingham, which had been accepted. The men had read about his Roux price in the newspaper.

Within five years, he managed to take over the job of the chef, become a partner in the business and buy the restaurant with his wife, which is now Sat Bain's restaurant.

The self-made chef is committed to developing seven and ten-course meals and has admitted that he cannot offer à la carte cooking.

He was crowned one of the winners of the BBC's Great British Menu show in 2007.

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