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Michael Gove says that face covering is NOT mandatory in shops in England


Michael Gove says that face covering will NOT be mandatory in stores in England, although Boris Johnson points out the move – and Nicola Sturgeon imposes the rule in Scotland

  • Michael Gove said that face covering isn't mandatory in English stores
  • The cabinet minister insisted that the government would "trust" people to do the right thing
  • Boris Johnson indicated an obligatory mask and Scotland has imposed the rule

Michael Gove today rejected the idea of ​​making facewear compulsory in stores – although Boris Johnson strongly suggested the change.

The cabinet minister said it was best to "trust" the public and wearing a mask was a matter of "good manners."

The intervention comes after the Prime Minister said on Friday that he believed that the government "had to insist more strictly that people wear facial covers in confined spaces".

In the meantime, Nicola Sturgeon, who has prescribed the rule in shops in Scotland, said that masks are the "right thing".

And she responded to the UK government's coronavirus response by highlighting that 147 of the 148 deaths recorded yesterday were in England.

When asked about the topic on the BBC's Andrew Marr Show this morning, Mr. Gove said, "I don't think this is mandatory, no, but I would encourage people to wear face masks when in an environment where they're likely to mix with others and where ventilation may not be as good as it could be.

In the BBC's Andrew Marr show today, Michael Gove said it was best to trust the public and wearing a mask was a matter of good manners.

Boris Johnson was first publicly presented with a face mask in his Uxbridge constituency on Friday

Boris Johnson was first publicly presented with a face mask in his Uxbridge constituency on Friday

Nicola Sturgeon, who made the rule compulsory in shops in Scotland, said today that masks are the "right thing"

Nicola Sturgeon, who made the rule compulsory in shops in Scotland, said today that masks are the "right thing"

How the government's line of face covering has changed over the months

March 12th: Deputy chief physician Dr. Jenny Harries: For an average audience walking down a street, it's not a good idea. In fact, you can catch the virus in the mask and inhale it.

April 16: Chief Medical Officer Professor Chris Whitty said, "Evidence is weak, but evidence of little effect is available in certain circumstances."

April 21: Revealed in the minutes of the meeting a month later, Sage advised: "All in all, there is enough evidence to support the recommendation to use fabric face masks for short periods of time in enclosed spaces where social distancing is not possible."

April 23: Dr. Jenny Harries said there could be "very, very little potential positive effect in some closed environments".

April 24: Health Minister Matt Hancock said: “With masks, science advances as more information comes in, and we always think about that science and then make the decision. The government position has remained unchanged to this day. & # 39;

April, 30th: Boris Johnson said: "I think face coverings will be useful, both for epidemiological reasons and to give people the confidence that they can work again."

May 20: Researchers in Hong Kong found that face masks reduced the infection by up to 75 percent.

June 4: Secretary of Transport Grant Shapps announced that faceguard will be mandatory for public transportation as of June 15. He said, "As more and more people use transportation, the evidence suggests that wearing facewear offers some, if limited, protection against the spread of the virus."

June 5th: Health Minister Matt Hancock revealed plans to make face coverage compulsory for all employees, visitors and outpatients in hospitals starting June 15, but an angry NHS chief said the decision was made "without notice or consultation". In the meantime, Grant Shapps said that masks in other environments, such as shops, would not be necessary because people spend little time nearby.

June 12: German study suggests that the mandatory introduction of face masks could slow the spread of Covid-19 by up to 40 percent.

10th of July: The prime minister says the government "must insist more strictly that people wear facial covers in confined spaces". A government source later reports that it is a "fair assumption" that masks will become mandatory in stores and other interiors within a few weeks.

July 12: Michael Gove says that masks in shops in England will not be mandatory. He insists that it is best to trust the public, and wearing a face mask is a matter of "good manners."

“I think it is fundamentally good manners, courtesy and consideration to wear a face mask when you are in a shop, for example.

"I trust people's common sense. Now, of course, the government is always reviewing emerging evidence of how best to control the disease.

“If necessary and if tough action is required and, as we saw in Leicester, obviously a completely different situation, then hard action will be taken.

"But on the whole … it's always best to trust people's common sense."

Mr. Johnson was first presented in public with a face mask on Friday when he was at a pub store and a hairdresser in his Uxbridge constituency.

Government sources subsequently announced that it was a "fair assumption" that masks would become mandatory in shops and other interiors within a few weeks.

It is currently recommended in England to take measures such as face covering when people cannot be two meters apart indoors.

The only place where they are commissioned is public transport. In Scotland, masks were mandatory in shops from Friday.

During an online Q&A session with members of the public on Friday, the Prime Minister admitted that the balance of scientific opinion has apparently shifted in how effective masks can be.

"I think we need to insist that people in tight spaces where they meet people they don't normally meet wear facewear," said Johnson.

Before the PP photo op, Ms. Sturgeon had appeared in public with a tartan model and trolled Mr. Johnson by retweeting an article asking why Westminster politicians weren't wearing them.

A survey by Redfield & Wilton Strategies for MailOnline found that 61 percent of the population in England wanted coverage to be enforced in shops and supermarkets – only 26 percent opposed it.

Figures from the National Statistics Bureau last week indicate that half of the adults are already routinely attracting them.

Health Minister Matt Hancock was seen wearing a mask while visiting a hospital, while Culture Minister Oliver Dowden also wore one this week when he visited a gallery.

But even though he revealed that he has a Florence Nightingale mask, the prime minister had never been seen with one before.

Chancellor Rishi Sunak had a backlash last week after imagining serving customers face-to-face food on a Wagamamas in London.

London Mayor Sadiq Khan said in writing to the Prime Minister that he was "disappointed and frustrated" that the government had not said that masks must be worn in "busy and closed public places".

The Labor politician added: “Face coverings are not only critical to public health.

"They could play an increasing role in supporting public confidence and our economic recovery."

A survey by Redfield & Wilton Strategies for MailOnline found that 61 percent of the population in England wanted coverage to be enforced in shops and supermarkets - only 26 percent opposed it. The support is reflected across the UK

A survey by Redfield & Wilton Strategies for MailOnline found that 61 percent of the population in England wanted coverage to be enforced in shops and supermarkets – only 26 percent opposed it. The support is reflected across the UK

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