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Meghan Markle's heart "hurts" for young people entering the "world of insecurity and injustice".


Meghan Markle's heart "hurts" for young people entering a world of "insecurity and injustice", and she hopes that her passionate speech to segregation students from her old school will give them, according to a report, "Hope, Comfort and inspiration ".

The Duchess of Sussex broke her silence about George Floyd's murder and supported the protests against Black Lives Matter in the United States last week during a speech to alumni of Immaculate Heart High School in Los Angeles.

She announced that she hadn't spoken about the death of the 46-year-old black man, who died after white policeman Derek Chauvin put his knee on his neck for nine minutes on May 25 in Minneapolis because she was "nervous" was. .

A source said hello! Magazine that the situation for Meghan, 38, who disclosed in the past how racism affected her own family, "triggered a lot of emotions".

The Duchess of Sussex broke her silence earlier this week about George Floyd's murder, stating that "black lives are important" and revealed that she had not previously spoken about his death because she was "nervous". 38-year-old Meghan gave a speech to the graduates of her old school, the Immaculate Heart High School in Los Angeles (picture).

The Duchess of Sussex broke her silence last week about the murder of George Floyd and said that "black lives are important", revealing that she had not previously spoken about his death because she was "nervous". 38-year-old Meghan gave a speech to the graduates of her old school, the Immaculate Heart High School in Los Angeles (picture).

& # 39; Meghan was thrilled to be part of the IHHS graduation ceremony, but after this week, she knew that there was no way she could speak to a group of compassionate, service-minded young women without George Floyd and the racism that plagues this country to address. & # 39; They said.

“Her heart hurts for young people who are entering a world of insecurity and injustice. She hopes that her words will give the school community she cares about a little hope, comfort or inspiration. & # 39;

In her poignant six-minute virtual speech delivered to her former school students, Meghan said, "George Floyd's life was important and Breonna Taylor's life was important and Philando Castile's life was important and Tamir Rice's life was important."

The other three people Meghan mentioned were African Americans who had been killed by the US police in the past six years.

The Duchess also referred to Los Angeles as the "hometown" of the family after she moved there with Harry and her son Archie.

Meghan was excited to attend the IHHS graduation ceremony, according to the source, but knew after this week that there was no way she could speak to a group of compassionate, service-minded young women without addressing George Floyd and the racism that plagues (the US) & # 39;

Meghan was excited to attend the IHHS graduation ceremony, according to the source, but knew after this week that there was no way she could speak to a group of compassionate, service-minded young women without addressing George Floyd and the racism that plagues (the US) & # 39;

When she spoke about Mr. Floyd, she said, "I wasn't sure what I could tell you. I wanted to say the right thing and was very nervous that it would be taken apart. And I realized that the only wrong thing is to say nothing. & # 39;

The video was released for the black women's lifestyle magazine Essence, which it posted on its website, "Courtesy of Meghan, Duchess of Sussex."

The Duchess also said that the students "will have empathy for those who do not see the world through the same lens as you" and added: "With as diverse, lively and open-minded means as I know the teachings at Immaculate is heart , I know you know black lives are important. & # 39;

Meghan also referred to advice she received from a 15-year-old teacher and said, "I remember my teacher at the time, one of my teachers, Ms. Pollia, said to me when I was leaving for a day of volunteering to put others' needs above your own fears ".

"And it has been with me all my life and I've thought about it more than I have in the past week."

When Meghan (pictured in South Africa in September) spoke about Mr. Floyd, she said, "I wasn't sure what to say to you. I wanted to say the right thing and was very nervous that it would be taken apart. And I realized that the only wrong thing is to say nothing. & # 39;

When Meghan (pictured in South Africa in September) spoke about Mr. Floyd, she said, "I wasn't sure what to say to you. I wanted to say the right thing and was very nervous that it would be taken apart. And I realized that the only wrong thing is to say nothing. & # 39;

Meghan referred to her former theology teacher Maria Pollia, whom she previously described as a "remarkable student" who "was very enthusiastic about the material but always went a step further".

Meghan also talked to the students about their future and said, “You know that you will rebuild, rebuild and rebuild until it is rebuilt.

“Because if the foundation is broken, so are we. You will lead with love, you will lead with compassion, you will use your voice. & # 39;

Her speech left some Immaculate Heart students in tears, one on Twitter with the username & # 39; blm • gia & # 39; said: & # 39; Meghan Markle talks about George Floyd and BLM in my virtual graduation. I cry. & # 39;

Yesterday it turned out that Harry and Meghan had "quiet" meetings with key people and organizations associated with the Black Lives Matter movement to "educate" themselves.

Meghan mentioned three other people who have been killed by the US police in the past six years while speaking to students in their old school. She also referred to Los Angeles as the family's "hometown" after moving there with Harry and her son Archie (one of them together in South Africa in September).

Meghan mentioned three other people who have been killed by the US police in the past six years while speaking to students in their old school. She also referred to Los Angeles as the family's "hometown" after moving there with Harry and her son Archie (one of them together in South Africa in September).

According to a source, the couple had "private conversations" with people "at all levels" to ensure that they were "connected to issues of police brutality and the Black Lives Matter movement".

They said to Harper & # 39; s Bazaar & # 39; s royal editor Omid Scobie: "Harry and Meghan have had private conversations with community leaders and people at all levels to ensure they understand current events.

& # 39; This is something that is incredibly personal to Meghan, especially given what she has experienced. And as a couple, of course, that's very important. They both feel it, just like the rest of us. & # 39;

Meghan previously described the experiences of her mother and grandfather as well as her own journey as a biracial woman.

Floyd passed out and later died

Protests took place across America and beyond after white policeman Derek Chauvin knelt on George Floyd's unarmed neck for eight minutes and 46 seconds last week, despite Floyd's desperate request for help: "I can't breathe."

Protests took place across America and beyond after white policeman Derek Chauvin (see right) knelt on George Floyd's unarmed neck for eight minutes and 46 seconds last week, despite Floyd's desperate request for help: "I can't breathe ". Floyd (left and right) passed out and later died

The former suit star was the first hybrid in modern history to marry a high-ranking British king in 2018.

But Meghan and the Duke of Sussex resigned as senior royals in March to gain personal and financial freedom in the United States after reporting on their struggles for their royal life and intense media interest.

The American ex-actress, before marrying the Windsor family, as her grandfather told her as a child, said that he and his family stopped at Kentucky Fried Chicken during a road trip, but for & # 39; in the back of the Restaurants had to go. Colored and eating the chicken in the parking lot.

"This story still haunts me," she wrote. “It reminds me of how young our country is. How far have we come and how far do we have to go? & # 39;

An old clip by Meghan, which was shot as part of the "I won't stand for ..." campaign for the non-profit organization "Erase the Hate", has come to light after the recent protests. In the video, Meghan shared her hope that society would become more open.

An old clip by Meghan, which was shot as part of the "I won't stand for …" campaign for the non-profit organization "Erase the Hate", has come to light after the recent protests. In the video, Meghan shared her hope that society would become more open.

Meghan, whose father Thomas Markle is a Caucasian and mother Doria Ragland an African American, wrote about her background: “While my mixed heritage may have created a gray area around my self-identification that keeps me with one foot on either side of the fence I came to that to assume.

"To say who I am, to share where I come from, to express my pride in being a strong, confident, mixed race woman."

In a 2015 article for Elle Magazine, she said that she saw her mother's name called "the n-word" by another driver in Los Angeles and described the heartache it caused.

& # 39; My skin was racing with heat when I looked at my mother. Her eyes filled with hateful tears, I could only exhale a whisper of words, so quiet that they were barely audible: "It's okay, mom," she wrote.

Meghan also described how her great-great-great grandfather created his own identity when he was freed from slavery.

The Duchess has spoken in the past about how racism affected her own family. She is pictured as a young girl with her father Thomas Markle

The Duchess has spoken in the past about how racism affected her own family. She is pictured as a young girl with her father Thomas Markle

"Because in 1865 (which is so shockingly new) when slavery was abolished in the United States, former slaves had to choose a name. A family name, to be precise, ”she wrote.

"Perhaps the decision my great-great-great-grandfather made to start again is the thing that most closely connects me to my increasingly complex family tree is my longing to know where I come from and the common ground that connects me connects to my bloodline.

"He chose the last name Wisdom."

As a child, her father, from whom she has now estranged, founded a Barbie family at Christmas when they were only sold in sets with white or black dolls.

In her lifestyle blog, she wrote how her new collection had a black mother doll, a white father doll and a child of every color. My father had taken the sets apart and adjusted my family. & # 39;

"I am so sorry that you have to grow up in a world where this still exists": Meghan's full speech to students

& # 39; Immaculate Heart High School, the 2020 graduation class. In the past few weeks, I've been planning to say a few words for you to graduate.

“And as we all saw in the past week, what is happening in our country, state, and hometown LA was absolutely devastating.

"And I wasn't sure what to say to you. I wanted to say the right thing and was really nervous that I would not do it or that it would be taken apart.

“And I realized that the only wrong thing is not to say anything. Because George Floyd's life was important and Breonna Taylor's life was important and Philando Castile's life was important and Tamir Rice's life was important and so many other people whose names we know and whose names we don't know. Stephon Clark, his life was important.

“And I thought about that moment when I was in my second year of school, I was 15, and as you know, the second year is the year we do volunteer work, which is a requirement for graduation.

"And I remember my teacher at the time, one of my teachers, Ms. Pollia, said to me when I was leaving for a day of volunteering:" Always remember to put other people's needs above your own fears. "

“And that has been with me all my life and I've been thinking about it more than ever in the last week.

"The first thing I want to tell you is that I'm sorry. I am so sorry that you have to grow up in a world where this still exists. & # 39;

“I was 11 or 12 years old when I was about to start Immaculate Heart Middle School in the fall, and it was the LA Riots that were also triggered by senseless racism.

"And I remember the curfew and I remember hurrying home and on this drive home, seeing ashes fall from the sky and smelling the smoke, and seeing the smoke rise from buildings and people running out of buildings carrying bags and looted.

"And I remember seeing men in the back of a van who only had guns and rifles in their hands. And I remember driving up to the house and seeing the tree that had always been there, completely charred. And these memories don't go away.

“And I can't imagine that at 17 or 18 years old, as old as you are, you would have to have a different version of the same kind of experience. This is something you should understand, but an understanding as a history lesson, not as your reality.

"I am so sorry that we have not brought the world to a place where you deserve it.

“The other thing I remember at that time was how people got together, and we're seeing that right now. We see that from the sheriff in Michigan or the chief of police in Virginia.

“We see how people show solidarity, we see how communities come together and rise. And you will be part of this movement.

"I know that this is not the conclusion you have imagined and this is not the celebration that you have imagined.

"But I also know that there is a way for us to rephrase this so that you don't see it as the end of something, but rather as the beginning of using all the work, all values, all skills, that you've embodied in the past four years – and now you're channeling that.

& # 39; Now all this work is activated. Now you can be part of the reconstruction. And I know that sometimes people say how often do we have to rebuild?

"But you know that you will rebuild, rebuild and rebuild until it is rebuilt. Because if the foundation is broken, so are we. You will lead with love, you will lead with compassion, you will use your voice.

You will use your vote more than ever because most of you are 18 years old – or you will be 18 years old – so you will vote.

"You will have empathy for those who do not see the world through the same lens as you, because with eyes as diverse, lively and open as I know the teachings of Immaculate Heart, I know you know that black lives matter. So I'm excited to see what you'll do in the world.

"You are equipped, you are ready, we need you and you are prepared. I am so proud to call each of you an alumni colleague and I am so excited to see what you will do.

"Please know that I am cheering you on all the way, I am extremely proud of you and I congratulate you on today, the beginning of all the effects that you as a leader will have on the world that we all care so much crave for it. Congratulations, ladies, and thank you in advance. & # 39;

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