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Matt Hancock reiterates that areas with low infection will be downgraded in two weeks


Matt Hancock gave further advice today that areas with low infection will be downgraded to December 16 as the government is hit by a massive Tory riot.

The new tier system for England went into effect at midnight after the Commons approved it from 291 to 78 – but the healthy majority masked a disaster for Boris Johnson when a swath of his own MPs left him.

About 55 Tories took action against the prime minister in the largest uprising in this parliament, and he was only saved because Keir Starmer ordered Labor to abstain.

The group voted against the measures despite Mr Johnson personally waiting in the division's lobbies asking them to stay with the government. He had also vowed that there will be a more "granular" approach when the first review comes a fortnight after many MPs infuriated that relatively coronavirus-free areas were severely restricted due to nearby hotspots.

In a round of radio interviews this morning, the Health Minister again suggested making implementation of the post-December 16 levels more local – although Conservatives will find he has stopped making a firm commitment.

Also taking advantage of news that the Pfizer vaccine has been approved by UK regulators and will be marketed starting next week, Mr Hancock urged people not to give up efforts to suppress the disease now.

When asked on BBC Radio 4's Today program whether the government would divide the counties into counties next time, Hancock said, "Of course we're going to look at the country … according to the epidemiology, according to the human geographies where people live and work. & # 39;

He pointed to Slough as an example of an area that had split off in the last round of the plains.

When asked if Kent and Lancashire could do the same, Hancock said, "Where appropriate, we will definitely do it."

When challenged again whether that will happen from December 16, he said, “Yes. We did that in these localized restrictions … but the thing is, we want to keep this virus under control until a vaccine arrives. & # 39;

But Tory MPs have warned that if Mr Johnson does not keep moving, he will be in serious trouble.

& # 39; He's going to have a problem. There are people who expect it and they will be under pressure over Christmas if it doesn't happen, ”a former minister told MailOnline.

“He wants to get through the next two weeks. He would like to think long term until March, but to keep the rebels happy he had to put December 16th on the table. & # 39;

In other coronavirus news today:

  • UK regulators today approved Pfizer / BioNTech's Covid-19 vaccine, which paves the way for mass vaccination in just a few days. Britain has ordered 40 million cans;
  • Boris Johnson approved his brutal post-lockdown steps from the Commons last night, thanks to Sir Keir Starmer's tacit support, after witnessing the biggest Tory uprising in this Parliament when more than 50 Tories defied the whip.
  • The lockdown in England is over and shoppers took advantage of their new freedom to line up outside Primark before dawn for the wild Wednesday pre-Christmas bargains.
  • Nursing home residents can finally hug their families again after ministers announced one The national introduction of rapid tests means that relatives who are free of Covid can be visited again for the first time since March.
  • Private hospitals received millions in funding this summer, although most roughly two-thirds of the additional capacity, according to leaked documents, was not used.
  • The UK recorded another 13,430 Covid infections and 603 deaths yesterday as the second wave of the disease continues to subside.

In a round of radio interviews this morning, Health Secretary Matt Hancock again suggested making implementation of the levels after Dec. 16 more local – though Conservatives will notice he has stopped making a firm commitment

Dozens of Conservatives joined a mutiny amid the anger that only 1 percent of England was subjected to the lowest restrictions, despite few or no infections in many Level 3 areas

Dozens of Conservatives joined a mutiny amid the anger that only 1 percent of England was subjected to the lowest restrictions, despite few or no infections in many Level 3 areas

Boris Johnson said there was a "compelling case" for the regional levels as he faced a Commons showdown over his new coronavirus rules

Keir Starmer

Boris Johnson (left) said there was a "compelling case" for the regional levels as he faced a Commons showdown over his new coronavirus rules. But Keir Starmer (right) warned Tories, hoping they will be downgraded within 14 days: "That won't happen."

Who are the Tory MPs who opposed Boris Johnson and voted against the tiered system?

53 Conservative MPs opposed Boris Johnson and voted against the Prime Minister's new coronavirus system.

You are:

Adam Afriyie (Windsor)

Imran Ahmad Khan (Wakefield)

Graham Brady (Altrincham and Sale West)

Andrew Bridgen (northwest Leicestershire)

Paul Bristow (Peterborough)

Christopher Chope (Christchurch)

Greg Clark (Tunbridge Wells)

James Daly (Bury North)

Philip Davies (Shipley)

David Davis (Haltemprice and Howden)

Jonathan Djanogly (Huntingdon)

Jackie Doyle-Price (Thurrock)

Richard Drax (South Dorset)

Iain Duncan Smith (Chingford and Woodford Green)

Mark Francois (Rayleigh and Wickford)

Marcus Fysh (Yeovil)

Cheryl Gillan (Chesham and Amersham)

Chris Green (Bolton West)

Damian Green (Ashford)

Kate Griffiths (Burton)

Mark Harper (Forest of Dean)

Philip Hollobone (Kettering)

David Jones (Clwyd West)

Julian Knight (Solihull)

Robert Largan (High Peak)

Pauline Latham (Mid Derbyshire)

Chris Loder (West Dorset)

Tim Loughton (East Worthing and Shoreham)

Craig Mackinlay (South Thanet)

Anthony Mangnall (Totnes)

Karl McCartney (Lincoln)

Stephen McPartland (Stevenage)

Esther McVey (Tatton)

Huw Merriman (Bexhill and Battle)

Robbie Moore (Keighley)

Anne Marie Morris (Newton Abbot)

Robert Neill (Bromley and Chislehurst)

Mark Pawsey (rugby)

John Redwood (Wokingham)

Mary Robinson (Cheadle)

Andrew Rosindell (Romford)

Henry Smith (Crawley)

Ben Spencer (Runnymede and Weybridge)

Desmond Swayne (New Forest West)

Craig Tracey (North Warwickshire)

Tom Tugendhat (Tonbridge and Malling)

Matt Vickers (Stockton South)

Christian Wakeford (Bury South)

Charles Walker (Broxbourne)

Jamie Wallis (Bridgend)

David Warburton (Conservative – Somerton and Frome)

William Wragg (Conservative – Hazel Grove)

Jeremy Wright (Conservative – Kenilworth and Southam)

Another two Tory MPs, Steve Baker and Robert Syms, acted as narrators for MPs who voted against the measures.

Although the Labor move guaranteed victory number 10, Mr Johnson was exposed to the wrath of his own benches. If all opposition parties had voted against the government, the prime minister would have been easily defeated.

The rebellion may have permanently wiped the possibility of a blanket shutdown of the virus in the future, and likely set alarm bells in No. 10 as the Prime Minister's authority continues to wane.

Dominic Raab tried to brush aside suggestions that the government was concerned about the scale of the revolt, even though Mr Johnson personally asked dozens of Tories to stand in line as they walked through the Noe lobby.

The foreign minister instead aimed to get Labor to abstain from the crunch vote and said tonight: “We listened to the MEPs on all sides of the House and passed this vote with a majority of over 200 votes.

& # 39;The most striking thing about these numbers is that Labor Party leader Keir Starmer abstained from voting during the pandemic of the biggest problem this country is facing today. He has nothing to say about it, no leadership, he doesn't know what to think or what the country should do. & # 39;

The day was desperately spent pulling opponents away, with the prime minister hinting that many areas of low infection could be pulled out of the toughest levels at the next review on December 16.

He also offered a "one-time" payment of £ 1,000 to "wet" pubs that are not serving food in recognition of "how badly they have been infected by this virus". On one final zoom call with mutinous Tories outside the division, Mr Johnson warned they shouldn't be like kids in the back of a car and said, "Are we almost there?"

To wrap up the debate, Health Secretary Matt Hancock suppressed tears as he referred to his step-grandfather's death from Covid in Liverpool last month and warned the government not to relax restrictions too much. "We have to beat this, we have to beat it together," he pleaded.

Previously, MPs lined up in the House of Representatives to criticize the government's plans despite the Prime Minister's urging on them to support his "convincing" case for his new post-lockdown levels. Former Health Secretary Jackie Doyle-Price summed up the sentiment for many by storming, "These decisions are really made on the back of a fag package but are destroying entire parts of the hospitality industry."

The strength of the feeling among critical backers even led backers usually to oppose the prime minister. Former Cabinet Secretary Jeremy Wright voted against the government "for the first time in 10 years". There had been talk of up to 100 conservative rebels – but the numbers were reduced to some extent.

A government spokesman said: "We welcome today's vote, which confirms our winter plan, ends national restrictions and brings England back into a tiered system.

& # 39; This will help secure the profits made last month and keep the virus under control. We will continue to work with Members who have raised concerns over the past few days. & # 39;

Mark Harper, chairman of the Covid Recovery Group of the lockdown skeptics Tories, called on the government to "take up" the criticism. "We very much regret that in a moment of national crisis so many of us felt compelled to vote against the measures proposed by the government," said the former head of Whip.

The vote means most areas of England will now start the New Year in one of the toughest stages, with a ban on mixing households indoors and strict hospitality controls.

Only the Isle of Wight, Cornwall and the Isles of Scilly have been designated for the lightest Tier 1 restrictions.

In courting his troubled party, Mr Johnson insisted the government was "sensitive" to local situations – suggesting areas with low infection rates will no longer be merged with other nearby hotspots.

He said the next review on December 16 will be conducted on the basis of "as many detailed details as possible". "We will try to be as sensitive as possible to local efforts and local successes," he said.

The MP said the whips had worked hard during the day to reassure high-constituency Conservatives that they would be downgraded within weeks while London pushed Tories for a private commitment not to upgrade the city to Tier 3.

But Sir Keir warned Conservative MPs that their downgrade hopes will be dashed as Tier 2 will "fight" to contain infection and Mr. Johnson always "over-promises and under-delivers". "That won't happen," he wiped off.

The Prime Minister also tried to allay the fears of the hospitality backbench companies by announcing that "wet" pubs that make a living on drinks will be eligible for £ 1,000 payments to get through this month.

Many Tories remained angry when ministers eventually released an impact assessment of the measures only to find that it did not contain any new details. Mark Harper, ringleader of the rebels, said the "wheels would break away from politics".

The government is assumed to have another dashboard that provides more detailed information on 40 sectors of the economy. Sources rejected the idea that it was "secret", saying that it only contains material that is already "publicly available" – although they insisted it not be published.

The UK is the first country to approve the Covid vaccine

UK regulators today approved Pfizer / BioNTech's Covid-19 vaccine, which paves the way for mass vaccination in just a few days.

Officials said the batch – which Britain has ordered 40 million doses of – will be made available "starting next week" when Health Secretary Matt Hancock said "aid is on the way".

Department of Health and Welfare officials made the announcement just after 7am this morning as England exited its second national lockdown and stores reopened for "Wild Wednesday".

Pfizer / BioNTech's vaccine has been shown to block 95 percent of coronavirus infections in late-stage studies, with younger volunteers and those over 65 who are most at risk of Covid being equally effective.

Mr Hancock said the end of the pandemic was "in sight" today and revealed that 800,000 doses of the sting will be available next week – enough to vaccinate 400,000 people since it is administered in two shots – but admitted the bulk of the won roll-out only in the new year.

He said: “The NHS is ready to start vaccinating early next week. The UK is the first country in the world to have a clinically approved vaccine to supply. & # 39; Mr Hancock announced that those vulnerable to Covid will come first, which means that residents and workers of nursing homes will be contacted first – despite claims that NHS workers would come first.

And Mr Hancock urged England to abide by the controversial three-tier lockdown system that went into effect today following its approval last night. He said the end was "in sight" and "we must get people to safety in the meantime". He told BBC Breakfast: "Easter will be better and next year we will have a summer everyone can enjoy."

Boris Johnson this morning hailed the vaccine approval, saying it would allow us to regain our lives and get the economy going again. The Prime Minister tweeted, “It's fantastic that @MHRAgovuk has officially approved the vaccine @ Pfizer / @ BioNTech_Group for Covid-19. The vaccine will be available across the UK from next week. It is the protection of vaccines that ultimately allows us to regain our lives and get the economy going again. & # 39;

A disgruntled MP told MailOnline, "The reason it isn't published is because it supports our case, not theirs."

Mr. Johnson explained his case that the new regional levels are “imperative” and emphasized, “This is not another lockdown. Nor is this the renewal of existing measures in England.

“The levels I am proposing would mean that starting tomorrow, anyone in England, including those in Tier 3, can leave their homes for whatever reason.

"And when they do that, they'll find that the shops are open for Christmas, the hairdressers are open, the nail bars are open, gyms, leisure centers, and swimming pools are open."

Challenged by a number of MPs – including former Cabinet Secretary Greg Clark, who represents Tunbridge Wells – for the harsh treatment of their areas, Mr Johnson said: “Going forward, the government will look at how we can think as closely as possible to the reality what is happening locally for the local people, the incidence of the disease, the human geography and spread of the pandemic, and the advances the areas are making in fighting the virus.

"We will try to be as sensitive as possible to local efforts and local successes to bring the pandemic under control."

He added, "We will be investigating the local incidents in detail, examining the human geography of the pandemic and carefully considering what happens every two weeks as I say."

Mr Johnson also targeted Labor "having no credible plan" to fight the coronavirus.

He said, “We are trying to run pubs, restaurants and shops across the country and no one feels the fear of these companies more than this government.

“However, I find it extraordinary that, despite the criticism we have, we do not have a credible plan from the opposing party; in fact, we have no view of the way forward.

"It's a pretty extraordinary thing that tonight (Sir Keir), who said he would always act in the national interest, told his party to sit on their hands and abstain from the vote tonight."

Despite his appeals, Mr. Johnson still faced a series of hostile interventions from his own banks over draconian restrictions that will leave 99 percent of England below the toughest two levels as of tomorrow.

Former Brexit minister Steve Baker, one of the rebel leaders, was among the government's opponents.

He said Not having to vote tonight to send a message to ministers, he added: "People like me have been looking not just for economic analysis, but serious analysis of these harms and benefits that come from government policies related to coronavirus."

He continued, “Here we are at a deeply dangerous moment and we are encountering violations of our immunizations and testing freedoms that we would normally never tolerate. So this evening I have to vote no with great reluctance to send a message to the government. & # 39;

Sir Graham Brady, chairman of the powerful 1922 Tory Committee, was among those who condemned the phased plan.

He said the Trafford district in its Altrincham and Sale constituency had been rated "unfairly" Tier 3. "I think the government did not bring this compelling case," he said. "The upside of the doubt that this house was extended in March and since then is more difficult."

Mr Johnson faced a number of hostile interventions from his own banks over draconian restrictions, including by the 1922 Committee Chairman Sir Graham Brady (pictured)

Mr Johnson faced a number of hostile interventions from his own banks over draconian restrictions, including by the 1922 Committee Chairman Sir Graham Brady (pictured)

Labor MPs defy Keir Starmer and vote against steps

Fifteen Labor MPs opposed Sir Keir Starmer's orders to abstain from voting last night, along with ex-leader Jeremy Corbyn, who is currently suspended from the whip. You are:

  • Apsana Begum (Poplar and Limehouse)
  • Richard Burgon (Leeds East)
  • Mary Kelly Foy (City of Durham)
  • Andrew Gwynne (Denton and Reddish)
  • Mike Hill (Hartlepool)
  • Kevan Jones (North Durham)
  • Emma Lewell-Buck (South Shields)
  • Ian Mearns (Gateshead)
  • Grahame Morris (Easington)
  • Kate Osborne (Jarrow)
  • Bell Ribeiro-Addy (Streatham)
  • John Spellar (Warley)
  • Graham Stringer (Blackley and Broughton)
  • Zarah Sultana (Coventry South)
  • Derek Twigg (Halton)

Former minister Andrea Leadsom suggested that the risk of non-compliance with lockdown restrictions is now "very high".

Mr. Clark highlighted the "big differences in the rate of covid" within Kent. Former Brexit Secretary David Davis insisted that the government should be far more local in its focus on lockdowns – pointing out that in countries like Germany, local restrictions sometimes affect individual factories.

Former Secretary of Culture Wright said, “For the first time in 10 years, I'm going to vote against my government on political grounds tonight. It is not because I am unwilling to share responsibility for difficult decisions that I have taken my stake in the government and voted for every set of Covid restrictions the government has proposed so far.

“And not because I am against moving away from nationwide restrictions and towards a localized tiered structure, I support this, but the logic of this approach is that you make the restrictions as local as possible in order to make them accurate and reliable Reconciling virus data.

"We have this data at the county and county levels. Why don't we consistently impose our restrictions at that level?"

Another ex-cabinet minister, Damian Green, who represents Ashford in Kent, said "stupid rules" undermine government efforts.

"I shared the thoughts of a voter with the Prime Minister last week who said that if the government imposes stupid rules, people will stop following the decent rules, too," he said.

& # 39; Unfortunately, this was rejected. Since then, the national debate has evolved about how big a Scottish egg needs to be to make an essential meal. I rest my case.

“I fear what we have before us today does not stand the test of maximizing voluntary public support.

"To be precise, this is certainly the case in my constituency, where I've had the angry emails since Dominic Cummings went to Barnard Castle over a weekend."

Senior Tory Sir Charles Walker complained that the death of the elderly was being classified as a "tragedy".

He told the Commons, “No government can abolish death, it is impossible – 615,000 people die in this country every year and not every death is a tragedy. It is so disturbing when I hear leaders of political parties, leaders of their communities, and leaders in this place say that every death has been a tragedy.

“A tragedy is when a child dies. Tragedy is when a young woman or young man dies, or when you get downcast in your middle years. But when we say that it is a tragedy when someone reaches their mortality by the age of 80 or 90, we are diminishing the life that is so well lived.

“We're diminishing love, we're diminishing the way that person was valued and valued. So please, please, we can just change the narrative when we talk about death because not all deaths are the same, it gives the same result, but comparing the death of someone in 90 to the death of someone in 19 is not right, it's not okay.

“But of course the death of the elderly has brought tragedy with it, and that tragedy is that for the past few days and months they have been denied touch with the people they love. We have kept families separated for the benefit of an old person who desperately wants to see his child and desperately wants his daughter to be cared for for the past few months and weeks.

"So my plea for this place is, we can include older people in this discussion because they love their children and grandchildren and want to see them thrive, they want them to have the same opportunities and opportunities that they have in their lives had."

To wrap up the debate, Mr Hancock suppressed tears as he revealed that his step-grandfather had died of coronavirus last month.

The Minister of Health made an emotional appeal to the nation to stick with Boris Johnson's new Covid-19 system due to roll out across England tomorrow.

Mr Hancock said that when the disease "gets out of hand, it grows exponentially, hospitals come under pressure and people die".

He said "this is not just speculation" because the virus affected thousands of families, including his own, as he paid tribute to his step-grandfather, Derek, who passed away on Nov. 18.

Although the majority of the headlines 213 were healthy, there appear to have been 56 Conservative rebels - the biggest mutiny in this Parliament after 44 previously opposed the pub curfew

Although the majority of the headlines 213 were healthy, there appear to have been 56 Conservative rebels – the biggest mutiny in this Parliament after 44 previously opposed the pub curfew

Could YOUR area be hit with different restrictions than the rest of your county?

KENT: HOW ONLY SIX PARTS OF THE COUNTY SEE FALLS RISING

No10's bizarre decision to bring all of Kent in England's new lock to level three is a symbol of the unequal locks. The rural villages are being hampered by economically damaging curbs imposed as a result of major eruptions miles away.

Only six of 13 subordinate agencies in Kent – Medway, Tonbridge and Malling, Maidstone, Ashford, Folkestone and Hythe, and Dover – saw coronavirus cases spike last week, according to government figures.

This means that the other areas of the county will be hit by draconian restrictions on closing all pubs and restaurants and keeping them only for take out, despite the fact that their outbreaks have been reversed.

Even Swale – England's current Covid-19 hotspot with an infection rate of 559.7 in the week ending November 25 – saw cases decline.

Health Department statistics also provide a much more detailed breakdown of the coronavirus outbreak in Kent, which shows that the infection rate in parts of the county is below the seven-day rolling average of 167.8. This means that the county’s general outbreak is being skewed by major epidemics along the north coast

Health Department statistics also provide a much more detailed breakdown of the coronavirus outbreak in Kent, which shows that the infection rate in parts of the county is below the seven-day rolling average of 167.8. This means that the county’s general outbreak is being skewed by major epidemics along the north coast

Only six of 13 subordinate agencies in Kent - Medway, Tonbridge and Malling, Maidstone, Ashford, Folkestone and Hythe, and Dover - saw coronavirus cases spike last week, according to government figures

Only six of 13 subordinate agencies in Kent – Medway, Tonbridge and Malling, Maidstone, Ashford, Folkestone and Hythe, and Dover – saw coronavirus cases spike last week, according to government figures

Health Department statistics also provide a much more detailed breakdown of the coronavirus outbreak in Kent, which shows that the infection rate in parts of the county is below the seven-day rolling average of 167.8. This means that the county’s general outbreak is being skewed by major epidemics along the north coast.

And the sense of injustice the county feels towards the tougher curbs is exposed in the 1,600-resident village of Groombridge. They're just a seven-minute walk from each other, but Downing Street's revamped three-tier system means the two pubs can be in different countries.

Located on the East Sussex / Kent border, the Junction Inn and Crown Inn may have been visited at their quaint home in the afternoon before the coronavirus. However, a geographic and state quirk means that they fall under different levels of coronavirus restrictions and face very different futures.

If the UK's national lockdown is finally lifted, the Crown Inn in Kent will have to remain closed at enormous economic costs. Meanwhile, 500 yards down the road in East Sussex, the Junction Inn can open its doors to serve a hearty meal and drink.

BRISTOL, SOUTH GLOUCESTERSHIRE AND NORTH SOMERSET: Prices are so low in parts of the county that officials don't say how many cases have been diagnosed

All of Bristol, South Gloucestershire and North Somerset will also fall victim to the toughest curbs by tomorrow, although the region's eruption appears to be focused on only two areas.

In some areas of the three affected regions, Covid levels are so low that officials are unable to confirm how many cases have been diagnosed in the past week, fearing it could inadvertently lead to infected residents being identified.

For example, the Charfield, Wickwar and Iron Acton districts, which border neighboring Tier Two Stroud, had fewer than three infections in the week ended November 25.

In some areas of the three affected regions (in white), the Covid levels are so low that officials are not confirming how many cases have been diagnosed in the past week, fearing that it could inadvertently lead to infected residents being identified will

In some areas of the three affected regions (in white), the Covid levels are so low that officials are not confirming how many cases have been diagnosed in the past week, fearing that it could inadvertently lead to infected residents being identified will

All three counties have an infection rate above the UK average, with Bristol being the highest at 210.0, followed by North Somerset (185.1) and South Gloucestershire (173.3).

All three counties have an infection rate above the UK average, with Bristol being the highest at 210.0, followed by North Somerset (185.1) and South Gloucestershire (173.3).

And Backwell and Flax Bourton, which are in the heart of North Somerset, will also face the toughest of rules when England's lockdown ends on December 2nd, although there were fewer than three cases last week.

All three counties have an infection rate above the UK average, with Bristol being the highest at 210.0, followed by North Somerset (185.1) and South Gloucestershire (173.3).

But even these are skewed due to breakouts in hotspots. Health Department data shows Weston Uphill in Weston-Super-Mare had an infection rate of 488.0 in the seven days as of Nov. 25. But just 12 miles away in the Wrington, Felton and Dundry districts, the rate is only 48.5.

Boris Johnson promised to base the animal allocation on "common sense" and the government's "winter plan" included a number of metrics to be used. These are: case detection rates in all age groups; Case detection rates in the over 60s; The rate at which falls rise or fall; Positivity rate (the number of positive cases detected as a percentage of tests performed); and pressures on the NHS, including current and planned occupancy.

However, there are no specific numerical trigger points, and the document added that there will "be some flexibility to trade these indicators against each other depending on the context".

WARWICKSHIRE: TIER 3 STRATFORD-UPON-AVON HAS A LOWER INFECTION RATE THAN TIER 2 NEIGHBORS IN NORTHAMPTONSHIRE

Stratford-upon-Avon, in Warwickshire, was one of the areas to suffer the same fate as Kent after facing severe restrictions due to its neighbors.

It will enter stage three when England's lockdown is lifted, but the infection rate is massively below average (92.2) – and it's still falling.

Stratford-upon-Avon, in Warwickshire, was one of the areas to suffer the same fate as Kent after facing severe restrictions due to its neighbors

Stratford-upon-Avon, in Warwickshire, was one of the areas to suffer the same fate as Kent after facing severe restrictions due to its neighbors

Stratford-upon-Avon, in Warwickshire, was one of the areas to suffer the same fate as Kent after facing severe restrictions due to its neighbors

Stratford-upon-Avon, in Warwickshire, was one of the areas to suffer the same fate as Kent after facing severe restrictions due to its neighbors

The neighboring states of Daventry and South Northamptonshire, which defied the strictest rules and fell into the second tier, actually have larger outbreaks, according to government statistics.

For example, for the week ended November 25, the Daventry infection rate was 117.5 while that of South Northamptonshire was 152.4.

The overall infection rate in Warwickshire is 168.2, which means it is only slightly above the English average. But higher rates in Coventry and Birmingham – metropolitan areas bordering on Warwickshire's authority – have likely led ministers to take the toughest of measures.

But the same injustices will still be felt in Cubbington, Stoneleigh and Radford Semele. Fewer than three Covid-19 cases were recorded in the district last week.

Health chiefs refuse to confirm how many infections there have been when the area has had fewer than three to protect people's identities.

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