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Matt Hancock faces curfew at 10 p.m. despite Tory's anger


Matt Hancock warned today that "hundreds of thousands" of Britons could die of Covid-19 if ministers relax all restrictions and allow the malignant disease to "roam" the country again.

The Health Minister admitted it was "perfectly reasonable" to argue that No. 10 should drop all measures, including the hotly contested 10pm curfew and the rule of six, in favor of a Swedish anti-pandemic approach a draconian closure was decided by spring.

But in a blunt response, he added, "I just think the hundreds of thousands of deaths that would ensue are not a price anyone should pay." His words were in line with those of the Prime Minister, who insisted in a grim press conference last night that the virus could run its course and overwhelm the NHS, causing thousands more deaths.

His dramatic warning, contrary to even the sharpest predictions of Downing Street's top two academic advisors, came when he announced strict local lockdown measures in Liverpool, Hartlepool, Warrington and Middlesbrough. Around a third of the UK – in the region of 22 million people – will be subject to additional controls when the guidelines come into force.

But ministers are already on the brink of a revolt over the measures, and Middlesbrough's mayor vows to oppose the ban on indoor contact with other households. Andy Preston, who is independent and not affiliated with any political party, accused the ministers of "ignorance" and claimed the measures were tougher than himself and other local politicians.

Mr Hancock's refusal to question civil liberties also came as he evaded calls in the House of Commons for an explanation of the scientific basis for the economically crippling curfew at 10 p.m. Anger over the restriction has increased amid fears it could kill parts of the industry and destroy thousands of jobs.

His warning that "hundreds of thousands" could die if the disease spread across the UK again – although the total death toll is currently only 42,000 – was sparked by an outburst from an angry Tory MP who accused him of not acting like one true conservative and a "nanny state".

However, a range of data suggested that the UK's outbreak is no longer turning into another crisis. The heads of the Ministry of Health announced a further 6,914 coronavirus cases 4.2 percent in one week, despite warnings from the government's chief scientist, Sir Patrick Vallance, and English chief medical officer, Professor Chris Whitty, that Britain is heading for 50,000 new infections a day by mid-October.

Other promising statistics – from the government-funded REACT-1 study conducted by academics at Imperial College London – suggest the R-rate has dropped to 1.1 from 1.7 in September. The report, which is based on tens of thousands of random swab tests, also claimed that cases are rising less steeply than they were a few weeks ago.

Separate estimates from King & # 39; s College London's Covid Symptom Study suggest the increase in daily new cases is only 23 percent higher than last week, after more than doubling the week before.

Health Secretary Matt Hancock has been repeatedly challenged by Tories about the volatile restrictions when he announced new lockdown measures in Commons today

Health Secretary Matt Hancock has been repeatedly challenged by Tories about the volatile restrictions when he announced new lockdown measures in Commons today

UK announces 6,914 more coronavirus cases and 59 deaths

The UK has announced another 6,914 coronavirus cases as a wave of statistics today suggests the surge in infections in the UK is finally slowing – but deaths continue to creep in.

Health ministry figures show the number of daily infections this week is only 4.2 percent higher than last Thursday when 6,634 positive tests were added to the official count.

Officials today declared another 59 laboratory-confirmed Covid-19 deaths, up 47.5 percent from the 40 reported around this time last week, but a slight decrease from the 71 recorded yesterday. For comparison, in the darkest Weeks of the first wave in April, more than 1,000 people died every day.

Although the death toll continues to rise, the data now suggests that the rising number of cases that rocked the nation in recent weeks appears to be slowing.

Although the current number of positive tests seems high, and higher than during the peak in March and April, they remain just a wave as scientists predict that more than 100,000 people will contract the virus by spring and tests will have increased by tens of thousands every day when the same amount of swabs has been made.

The government-funded REACT-1 study conducted by Imperial College London found evidence that the R-rate fell from 1.7 in September to around 1.1 and that cases are rising less steeply than now in a few weeks before.

As the UK coronavirus crisis sank into more chaos today:

  • Transport Minister Grant Shapps announced that Turkey and Poland will be placed on the government's "red list" of travel quarantine – but travel to Greece and Italy is still allowed.
  • Anger erupted after Matt Hancock mistakenly shot down vitamin D as a potential coronavirus treatment, despite growing evidence from scientific studies around the world suggesting this might be helpful.
  • Former Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt argued that the UK was in a "completely different position" than it was in the spring and that local lockdowns may have helped avoid another disaster.
  • Former Labor leader Jeremy Corbyn broke the "Six Rules" at a dinner to commemorate the late Occupy Wall Street organizer, David Graeber, who died suddenly in Venice last month.
  • Fashion giant H&M announced its plan to close 250 stores worldwide, while Burger King prepares to lay off 1,600 UK employees to permanently close some of its UK branches.
  • Ministers are preparing for unemployment to hit four million in the winter months, as pub bosses have warned that a quarter of employees will have to be laid off after their vacation ends.

Health ministry figures show the number of daily infections this week is only 4.2 percent higher than last Thursday when 6,634 positive tests were added to the official count.

Officials today declared another 59 laboratory-confirmed Covid-19 deaths, up 47.5 percent from the 40 reported around this time last week, but a slight decrease from the 71 recorded yesterday.

Although the death toll continues to rise, the data now suggests that the rising number of cases that rocked the nation in recent weeks appears to be slowing.

According to estimates from the Covid Symptom Study at King's College London, the increase in new cases every day is only 23 percent higher than last week, after more than doubling the week before.

This afternoon the mayor-elect of Middlesbrough vowed to defy new lockdown measures and accused ministers of ignorance after introducing harsh new measures on the population.

The independent Andy Preston struck after Health Secretary Matt Hancock told MPs that the city, along with Liverpool, Hartlepool and Warrington, would face the same curbs as the northeast.

In a video message, Mr Preston said they went further than he and other local politicians advocated and in a measure adopted as the first measure adopted for a local politician, opposed the measures outlined in the Commons.

Middlesbrough and Hartlepool councils had called for a ban on mixing households in their own homes. But Mr Hancock announced that it would be illegal for households in these districts to mingle in a public setting such as a pub.

"I have to tell you that I think this measure was put in place because of factual inaccuracies and a monstrous and frightening lack of communication and ignorance," Preston said in a video posted on Twitter.

In the Commons, Conservative former Cabinet Secretary Greg Clark asked: “It seems strange to think that concentrating commerce on a smaller number of hours and leaving one pub or restaurant at once by all means that they are not one another during the year The evening was meant to suppress rather than spread the virus. & # 39;

Mr Hancock replied, "The scientific advice is that the people closer together are more likely to spread the virus and later that night social distancing becomes more difficult.

“We've all seen the pictures of people leaving pubs at 10am, but otherwise they would have been in the facilities and we all know it's safer outside or they would leave later.

Conservative former Cabinet Secretary Greg Clark asked in the House of Commons about the scientific basis for politics

Conservative former Cabinet Secretary Greg Clark asked in the House of Commons about the scientific basis for politics

Holidays in Italy and Greece are SAVED – travelers from Turkey and Poland must now self-isolate for 14 days

Transport Minister Grant Shapps announced today that Turkey and Poland will be placed on the government's red list of travel quarantine – but travel to Greece and Italy is still allowed.

From 4 a.m. on Saturday, anyone returning from Turkey or Poland and the Caribbean islands of Bonaire, St. Eustatius and Saba must be quarantined for 14 days.

There has been speculation that after spiking, Italy and Greece would face restrictions in some cases, but the two nations ultimately received a respite.

Mr Shapps tweeted this evening: "TRAVEL CORRIDOR UPDATE: The latest data shows we need to remove Turkey, Poland and Bonaire, St. Eustatius and Saba from the # TravelCorridor list this week."

There were fears earlier today that Greece and Italy could be added after recording 20.5 cases per 100,000 people in recent days, while Italy was a little over 20 per 100,000.

The government currently uses a threshold of 20 cases per 100,000, along with a number of other criteria, when deciding whether to add or remove countries from its quarantine list.

"Of course we will keep reviewing this and we are constantly looking at ways to improve these guidelines, but I think we need to review both sides of the evidence to get this right."

Tory Backbencher Philip Davies accused Mr. Hancock of presiding over a "nanny state" with the 10pm curfew and urged him to "act like a conservative."

Mr Davies said, “Is the Secretary of State aware of the damage that the arbitrary 10pm curfew is causing to pubs, restaurants, bowling alleys and casinos? Is he aware of the jobs being lost just to see people congregate on the street and the store employees experience more abuse?

"When will the foreign minister start acting like a conservative who believes in individual responsibility and give up this arbitrary, socialist nanny approach that has no purpose other than further economic collapse and undermines our freedoms?"

But Mr Hancock said he was "deeply" disagree with Mr Davies, saying he believed in "individual responsibility and the promotion of freedom as long as others are not harmed".

He added, "So it is perfectly reasonable to argue that we should just let the virus rip apart. I just think the hundreds of thousands of deaths that would ensue are not a price anyone should pay."

However, ex-Cabinet Secretary Jeremy Hunt previously said the local lockdowns may have prevented the current second wave of infections from spreading across the country.

He told BBC Radio 4's Today program, “I think the evidence from what happened not just in this country but around the world earlier this year is that acting early, decisive and swift is indeed best way is to contain the spread of the virus and that's what i think Chris Whitty and the Prime Minister are saying.

“One of the things that often goes unnoticed about Italy was the successful way in which they managed to contain the virus outbreak in northern Italy, in Lombardy, and prevent it from spreading to the rest of the country.

“Now we haven't done it for the first time, but it may be that while we didn't see a large reduction in transmission in these areas, these local locks may have just contained them and prevented them from becoming the national outbreak that we had before. & # 39;

The UK is in a "completely different position" than it was in the spring and local lockdowns may have helped prevent another disaster, according to Jeremy Hunt.

The former health minister said today that mass testing "definitely changed" the effects of this second surge in certain cases.

The government is desperate to prevent the virus from suddenly spiraling out of control, but there is evidence that it is out of the question for now

The government is desperate to prevent the virus from suddenly spiraling out of control, but there is evidence that it is out of the question for now

The UK is now in "a completely different position" than it was in the spring, says Jeremy Hunt

Former Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt said today that regular swab tests should be done for NHS staff before winter

Former Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt said today that regular swab tests should be done for NHS staff before winter

The UK is in a “completely different position” than it was in the spring and local lockdowns may have helped prevent another disaster, according to Jeremy Hunt.

The former health minister said today that mass testing "definitely changed" the effects of this second surge in certain cases.

Mr Hunt, who is now chairman of the Parliament's Health Committee, reiterated his call for regular mass testing for NHS staff to keep an eye on the outbreak.

He has repeatedly spoken out in favor of politics and crushed government efforts to get large-scale tests up and running.

His comments come from the UK's positive coronavirus tests continue to rise to higher levels than they did during the darkest days of the spring outbreak.

But the cases now announced – which are believed to make up a large chunk of the actual number of infections – are still just a small point on the country's timeline after experts predicted more than 100,000 people a day get them on caught at the height of the epidemic, but only tiny ones are being tested.

Mr Hunt, who is now chairman of the Parliament's Health Committee, reiterated his call for regular mass testing for NHS staff to keep an eye on the outbreak.

He has repeatedly spoken out in favor of politics and crushed government efforts to get large-scale tests up and running.

Health Department statistics released today have also found that more people than ever are having to wait three days or more to find out if they have coronavirus after a personal test in England.

Official NHS test and trace data showed that members of the public performing swab tests at drive-through test sites or pop-up local and mobile centers are increasingly faced with waiting times.

Of the 155,000 people who used local test sites between September 17 and 23, 5.3 percent had to wait more than 72 hours to find out their result. That was an increase of just 1.8 percent a week ago.

The same trend was seen in regional drive-through locations and in mobile test units, with these three locations now accounting for the majority of public testing.

However, improvements were being made in other parts of the system at the same time, with return times decreasing for people tested in nursing homes and at home. The proportion of people who receive their results within 24 hours of a “personal test” also rose from 28.2 percent to 38.1 percent.

Statistics show that the number of people who tested positive for the disease hit a new high in the penultimate week of September. 31,373 confirmed cases, up 61 percent from 19,488 people the week before.

The test system has come under tremendous pressure in the past few weeks as Covid-19 cases have spiked across the country and more sick Britons are calling for swabs.

The Ministry of Health confirmed today that one in eight people in England now had a Covid-19 test – a total of 7.1 million people.

Officials put some of the pressure on people who ordered tests when they were technically ineligible, but statistics show the number of people getting the disease on a daily basis has more than tripled since early September.

It is because Mr Hancock was told today to "get his facts straight" after shooting down vitamin D as a potential coronavirus treatment, despite mounting evidence from around the world to suggest it works.

The study by Imperial College and Ipsos Mori revealed the north-south divide, pointing to the north-west as the epicenter of the UK outbreak

The study by Imperial College and Ipsos Mori revealed the north-south divide, pointing to the north-west as the epicenter of the UK outbreak

Mutiny in Middlesbrough: City revolts after Mayor REFSUES obeyed new lockdown rules

The independent Andy Preston struck after Health Secretary Matt Hancock told MPs that the city, along with Liverpool, Hartlepool and Warrington, would face the same curbs as the northeast

Independent Andy Preston struck after Health Secretary Matt Hancock told MPs that the city, along with Liverpool, Hartlepool and Warrington, would face the same curbs as the northeast

Boris Johnson faces a coronavirus riot in the north today as Middlesbrough mayor-elect pledged to defy new lockdown measures and accused ministers of ignorance after introducing tough new measures on the population.

Independent Andy Preston struck after Health Secretary Matt Hancock told MPs that the city, along with Liverpool, Hartlepool and Warrington, would face the same curbs as the northeast.

In a video message, Mr Preston said they went further than he and other local politicians advocated and opposed the measures outlined in the Commons, which is seen as a first for a local politician.

Middlesbrough and Hartlepool councils had called for a ban on mixing households in their own homes. But Mr. Hancock announced that it would be illegal for households in these districts to mingle in a public setting such as a pub.

"I have to tell you that I think this measure was put in place because of factual inaccuracies and a monstrous and frightening lack of communication and ignorance," Preston said in a video posted on Twitter.

& # 39; I do not accept the statement at all. I do not accept these measures. We need to speak to the government, they need to understand our local knowledge, expertise and ability to get things done and maintain jobs and wellbeing.

& # 39; We are really disappointed. From today's perspective, we are defying the government and are not accepting these measures.

"We need to get Covid under control and work with people to find a way to keep jobs and mental health."

As the chairman of the ward council, Mr. Preston has no official authority to override the decision made by ministers. In theory, however, it could prevent council staff from helping to enforce pub closings and household gatherings – although there is still no proposal to do so.

Experts have been calling on officials to investigate the effects of the immune system-boosting nutrient on Covid-19 patients for months after a mountain of research showed a link to vitamin D deficiency.

Mr Hancock told the House of Commons last week that he turned green on a government-funded "study" examining vitamin D and found it "appears to have no effects."

But officials have since admitted that no clinical trials have taken place, claiming it was a slip of the tongue by the health minister – who also spoke out strongly against face masks in the spring, claiming they were "extremely weak" at stopping Covid-19 Spread.

Officials estimate that one in five Britons is deficient in vitamin D – the equivalent of 13 million Britons.

For people with darker skin, such as However, for example, BAME populations known to be at higher risk for Covid-19, the rate is up to 90 percent.

Mr. Hancock has now agreed to meet experts to hear the growing fall in the vitamin the body produces when exposed to the sun.

But his funky vitamin D discharge has sparked anger among scientists and MPs, who said today that time is running out for ministers to act as the “sun vitamin” levels drop dramatically in the fall and winter.

Experts said his comments showed "incredible ignorance" while Liberal Democrat MP Layla Morgan told MailOnline that the foreign secretary should "listen, not dismiss".

She added, “I hope Matt Hancock will be less funky about potential treatments in the future and clarify his facts before making such comments. We are in a crisis. It is time for politicians to stop playing science and listen to the experts. & # 39;

A mountain of studies has found that an overwhelming number of people who test positive for Covid-19 do not have enough vitamin D in their bodies, and the sickest patients are often deficient.

Scientists have not yet been able to determine whether the lack of nutrients makes people more susceptible to the disease or whether a malaise leads to a drop in vitamin D levels.

But vitamin D supplements are safe, cheap, and readily available – they cost only 6p a pill and are sold in most pharmacies, supermarkets, and health food stores – which has puzzled experts why Mr Hancock would fire them so quickly.

Two senior doctors told MailOnline that politicians and scientists were so eager to get a vaccine – the government has pumped hundreds of millions into jab development projects – that they overlooked the potential of vitamin D and boosted people's immune systems far less glamorous option.

In other developments, Transport Minister Grant Shapps announced today that Turkey and Poland will be placed on the government's "red list" for travel quarantine – but holidays to Greece and Italy are still allowed.

From 4 a.m. on Saturday, anyone returning from Turkey or Poland and the Caribbean islands of Bonaire, St. Eustatius and Saba must be quarantined for 14 days.

There has been speculation that after a surge, restrictions would be imposed on Italy and Greece in some cases, but the two nations ultimately received a respite.

Mr Shapps tweeted tonight: & # 39; TRAVEL CORRIDOR UPDATE: The latest data shows we need to remove Turkey, Poland and Bonaire, St. Eustatius and Saba from the # TravelCorridor list this week.

The number of people who tested positive for Covid-19 in England rose 61 percent in the week ended September 23 to more than 31,000 from 19,000 the week before

The number of people who tested positive for Covid-19 in England rose 61 percent in the week ended September 23 to more than 31,000 from 19,000 the week before

Anger after Matt Hancock falsely said the study found NO evidence that vitamin D works

In addition to dietary supplements, vitamin D is also available through foods such as fatty fish, red meat, and eggs (right). A Singaporean study earlier this year of almost 800 people found that almost 99% of Covid 19 patients who died had a vitamin D deficiency (left).

In addition to dietary supplements, vitamin D is also available through foods such as fatty fish, red meat, and eggs (right). A Singaporean study earlier this year of almost 800 people found that almost 99% of Covid 19 patients who died had a vitamin D deficiency (left).

Health Secretary Matt Hancock was urged today to clarify his facts after shooting down vitamin D as a potential coronavirus treatment, despite mounting evidence from around the world to suggest it works.

Experts have been calling on officials to investigate the effects of the immune system-boosting nutrient on Covid-19 patients for months after a mountain of research showed a link to vitamin D deficiency.

Mr Hancock told the House of Commons last week that he turned green on a government-funded "study" examining vitamin D and found it "appears to have no effects."

But officials have since admitted that no clinical trials have taken place, claiming it was a slip of the tongue from the Minister of Health – who spoke out strongly against face masks this spring, claiming they were "extremely weak" at stopping the spread of Covid-19 .

Officials estimate that one in five Britons is deficient in vitamin D – the equivalent of 13 million Britons. For people with darker skin, such as However, for example, BAME populations known to be at higher risk for Covid-19, the rate is up to 90 percent.

Mr. Hancock has now agreed to meet experts to discuss the growing case of the vitamin the body produces when exposed to the sun. Aber seine flippige Entlassung von Vitamin D hat bei Wissenschaftlern und Abgeordneten Wut ausgelöst, die heute sagten, dass die Zeit für die Minister knapp wird, um zu handeln, da der Gehalt an „Sonnenvitamin“ im Herbst und Winter dramatisch sinkt.

Experten sagten, seine Kommentare zeigten "unglaubliche Ignoranz", während die liberaldemokratische Abgeordnete Layla Morgan gegenüber MailOnline erklärte, der Außenminister müsse "zuhören, nicht entlassen". Sie fügte hinzu: „Ich hoffe, Matt Hancock wird in Zukunft weniger flippig mit potenziellen Behandlungen umgehen und seine Fakten klarstellen, bevor er solche Kommentare abgibt. Wir befinden uns in einer Krise. Es ist Zeit für Politiker, nicht mehr Wissenschaft zu spielen und den Experten zuzuhören. & # 39;

Ein Berg von Studien hat ergeben, dass eine überwältigende Anzahl von Menschen, die positiv auf Covid-19 getestet wurden, nicht genug Vitamin D in ihrem Körper haben und die kranksten Patienten häufig einen Mangel haben. Wissenschaftler konnten noch nicht feststellen, ob der Nährstoffmangel die Menschen anfälliger für die Krankheit macht oder ob ein Unwohlsein zu einem Absturz des Vitamin-D-Spiegels führt.

Aber Vitamin-D-Präparate sind sicher, billig und leicht verfügbar – sie kosten nur 6 Pence pro Pille und werden in den meisten Apotheken, Supermärkten und Reformhäusern verkauft -, was Experten verblüfft hat, warum Herr Hancock sie so schnell entlassen würde.

Zwei führende Ärzte sagten MailOnline, dass Politiker und Wissenschaftler so sehr darauf aus waren, einen Impfstoff zu bekommen – die Regierung hat Hunderte von Millionen in Jab-Entwicklungsprojekte gepumpt -, dass sie das Potenzial von Vitamin D übersehen und das Immunsystem der Menschen gestärkt haben weit weniger glamouröse Option.

"Das heißt, wenn Sie ab Samstag, 3. Oktober, 4 Uhr morgens von diesen Zielen anreisen, müssen Sie sich selbst isolieren."

Er fügte hinzu: "Sie MÜSSEN sich selbst isolieren, wenn Sie aus einem nicht freigestellten Land nach Großbritannien einreisen. Ab morgen erhöhen wir die Strafen für Personen, die sich weigern, auf maximal 10.000 GBP für Wiederholungstäter."

Es gab heute früher Befürchtungen, dass Griechenland und Italien Quarantäneregeln unterliegen könnten, nachdem in den letzten Tagen 20,5 Fälle pro 100.000 Menschen verzeichnet wurden, während Italien etwas über 20 pro 100.000 lag.

Die Regierung verwendet derzeit einen Schwellenwert von 20 Fällen pro 100.000 zusammen mit einer Reihe anderer Kriterien, wenn sie entscheidet, ob Länder zu ihrer Quarantäneliste hinzugefügt oder daraus entfernt werden sollen.

Die heutige Ankündigung von Herrn Shapps bedeutet, dass Feiertage derzeit nur an Deutschland, Schweden, Italien, dem griechischen Festland, Gibraltar, San Marino und Liechtenstein ohne Einschränkungen möglich sind.

In den heutigen Wirtschaftsnachrichten machen sich die Minister darauf gefasst, dass die Arbeitslosigkeit in den Wintermonaten vier Millionen erreichen wird, da die Chefs der Kneipen gewarnt haben, dass ein Viertel der Mitarbeiter nach Beendigung des Urlaubs entlassen werden muss.

Der Ausgabenwächter des Amtes für Haushaltsverantwortung hat prognostiziert, dass die Arbeitslosigkeit bis Ende des Jahres einen Höchststand von 12 Prozent erreichen könnte, was vier Millionen Arbeitnehmern entspricht.

Die Arbeits- und Rentenministerin Therese Coffey hat bekannt gegeben, dass sich ihre Abteilung auf der Grundlage dieser Prognose vorbereitet und das Universalkreditsystem vor einem erwarteten Anstieg der Schadensfälle stärkt.

Sie bestand jedoch darauf, dass die Minister "wirklich hoffen, dass wir diese Zahl offensichtlich nicht erreichen".

Bundeskanzler Rishi Sunak beendet das Urlaubsprogramm Ende dieses Monats und ersetzt es durch ein weniger großzügiges Lohnzuschussprogramm, um Menschen zu helfen, die Teilzeit in „lebensfähigen“ Jobs arbeiten können.

Experten haben gewarnt, dass die Umstellung auf das Jobs Support Scheme unweigerlich zu einem weit verbreiteten Verlust von Arbeitsplätzen führen wird, da die Regierung die Hilfe für sogenannte "Zombie" -Rollen ohne Zukunft entfernt.

Die OBR hat in ihrem „zentralen“ Coronavirus-Wirtschaftsszenario prognostiziert, dass die Arbeitslosigkeit Ende 2020 einen Höchststand von vier Millionen erreichen wird.

In seiner "Abwärts" -Prognose mit 13 Prozent Arbeitslosigkeit ist die Zahl mit 4,5 Millionen sogar noch höher.

Der Modegigant H & M gab heute seinen Plan bekannt, 250 Geschäfte weltweit zu schließen, während Burger King sich darauf vorbereitet, 1.600 Mitarbeiter in Großbritannien zu entlassen.

Der zweitgrößte Bekleidungshändler der Welt gab an, dass rund ein Viertel seiner 5.000 Geschäfte im nächsten Jahr Verträge neu verhandeln oder kündigen können, wodurch einige Geschäfte geschlossen werden können.

H & M gibt noch keine Einzelheiten zur Anzahl der Arbeitsplatzverluste oder Ladenschließungen in Großbritannien bekannt, die aufgrund des Plans voraussichtlich stattfinden werden.

In der Zwischenzeit plant der Fast-Food-Riese Burger King, einige seiner britischen Niederlassungen im Rahmen eines durch die Pandemie ausgelösten Umstrukturierungsabkommens dauerhaft zu schließen.

Es befindet sich inmitten des Covid-19-Blutbads auf der Hauptstraße. Seit Beginn der Sperrung im März haben 195.331 Stellenverluste von großen britischen Arbeitgebern angekündigt.

Heute wurde auch bekannt, dass Jeremy Corbyn bei einem Abendessen gegen die verstorbene Occupy Wall Street-Organisator David Graeber gegen die Sechs-Regeln verstoßen hat.

Der ehemalige Labour-Führer (71) und seine Frau Laura Alvarez (51) nahmen zusammen mit seiner Witwe, der Künstlerin Nika Dubrovsky, am Londoner Essen teil.

Der 59-jährige Graeber starb Anfang letzten Monats plötzlich in Venedig und wurde weithin als Helfer bei der Organisation von Occupy und seinem Slogan „Wir sind die 99%“ anerkannt.

A picture that emerged of the gathering prompted Corbyn to apologise for breaking coronavirus restrictions on the number of people meeting in a household.

The former Labour leader had paid tribute to him in a special film last month and explained how he had become such good friends.

'We do not accept these measures': Middlesbrough's mayor leads backlash against lockdown as town is placed into same strict regime as North East along with Liverpool as Government plots 'three-tier traffic light' system for UK restrictions

Independent Andy Preston lashed out after Health Secretary Matt Hancock told MPs the town, along with Liverpool, Hartlepool and Warrington would face the same curbs as the North East

Independent Andy Preston lashed out after Health Secretary Matt Hancock told MPs the town, along with Liverpool, Hartlepool and Warrington would face the same curbs as the North East

Boris Johnson was facing a coronavirus revolt in the north today as the elected mayor of Middlesbrough vowed to 'defy' new lockdown measures, accusing ministers of 'ignorance' after they brought in strict new measures for its population.

Independent Andy Preston lashed out after Health Secretary Matt Hancock told MPs the town, along with Liverpool, Hartlepool and Warrington would face the same curbs as the North East.

In a video message Mr Preston said they went further than he and other local politicians had lobbied for, and in what is believed to be a first for a local politician, rejected the measures outlined in the Commons.

Middlesbrough and Hartlepool councils had asked for a ban on households mixing in their own homes. But Mr Hancock announced it would also be illegal for households in those boroughs to mix in a public setting such as a pub.

'I have to tell you I think this measure has been introduced based on factual inaccuracies and a monstrous and frightening lack of communication, and ignorance,' Mr Preston said in a video posted on Twitter.

'I do not accept the statement at all. I do not accept these measures. We need to talk to government, they need to understand our local knowledge, expertise and ability to get things done, and preserve jobs and well-being.

'We are really disappointed. As things stand we defy the Government and we do not accept these measures.

'We need to get Covid under control and we need to work with people to find a way of preserving jobs and mental health.'

As head of the local council Mr Preston has no official powers to over-rule the decision taken by ministers. But he could, in theory, prevent council staff from helping to enforce the pub closures and household meeting ban – though there has been no suggestion yet that he would.

The confirmation comes despite Mr Hancock hailing 'early' indications that the nationwide Rule of Six and 10pm pubs curfew are already bringing cases under control – and downgrading the swingeing measures in place in Bolton.

Meanwhile, there are signs that ministers are scrambling to simplify the rules after even the premier became muddled this week. A 'traffic light' system could be introduced to show what restrictions are in place for different regions, with three tiers of intensity.

There are hopes could help free up some parts of the South that have dramatically lower rates of infection than the North.

'There's no way people are going to stay at home': Furious residents of Middlesbrough join mayor in protest against lockdown measures

Furious locals in Middlesbrough today backed mayor Andy Preston in his defiance of the Government's new coronavirus restrictions.

Sarah Best, 28, who owns the Sherlock's and Dr Watson's bars in the North Yorkshire town, said she had feared she would have to close her doors in as little as three weeks under the latest rules.

She said: 'When people can only go the pub with members of their own household it's obviously going to reduce trade even more.

'The 10pm curfew has been bad enough and it doesn't work. People gather in the street and can't get taxis because everyone has to leave at once.

Landlady Sarah Best, 28, said she had feared she would have to close her doors in as little as three weeks under the latest rules

Landlady Sarah Best, 28, said she had feared she would have to close her doors in as little as three weeks under the latest rules

'We're just hanging on and if things don't change I might have to close the doors in three weeks, that's how bad it is. I really think customers will rebel, especially if the mayor is backing us.

'We'll listen to Andy, we get more support and back from the mayor than we do from government.  How do you enforce this rule anyway? I'm not going to be asking customers for utility bills.'

Nicola Brogan and Paula Hoare, both 27, added the rules are now 'so confused that it's impossible to enforce' them.

'It's crazy that we can't see relatives who need to see people to stay in touch but you can come down to the pub,' Ms Hoare said.

Nicola Brogan

Paula Hoare

Nicola Brogan (left) and Paula Hoare (right), both 27, added the rules are now 'so confused that it's impossible to enforce' them

'The mayor is sticking up for the town where there is already massive poverty.'

Ms Brogan added: 'I worked with the mayor on a charity project and he's a very well liked and respected guy. I think people will listen to what he thinks more than the government.'

Liam Watson, 24, said: 'There's no way people are going to stay at home and not go to the pub when you've got the mayor saying 'defy the ban.'

'Good for him. He's sticking up for people and trying to stop businesses going bust and if it comes down to it I'd rather listen to our local leader than some muppet at Westminster. They don't know anything about us.'

However, Craig Kevin, 47, who works in a fast food stall, said Mr Preston had merely 'added to the confusion' with his video statement.

'Andy Preston has added to the confusion and I think people will just decide to carry on as normal because they don't actually believe any of them,' he said.

'Boris Johnson didn't even know the rules as they apply to the North East when he was asked the other day so what chance do the public have, especially when national and local Government are saying different things.'

Nathaniel Lawton, 42, was today having a drink with friends outside the town's Swatter's Carr

Nathaniel Lawton, 42, was today having a drink with friends outside the town's Swatter's Carr

Nathaniel Lawton, 42, was today having a drink with friends outside the town's Swatter's Carr.

He said: 'It's funny to see Andy Preston saying 'defy the law' when he was the one who was asking for stricter rules in the first place.

'He decided MIddlesbrough needed restrictions but he hasn't got the ones he wanted which he should maybe have seen coming.

'There will always be those who adhere to the rules and those who don't. No matter what anybody says, whether it's the government or the mayor, people will decide the law doesn't apply to them.

'It's being spread anyway through offices and schools so I can't see the restrictions making that much difference.'

Results from the largest Covid-19 study in England found the R-rate fell from 1.7 to around 1.1 last month.

But the director of the study, by Imperial College London and Ipsos Mori, said the interim findings from 80,000 participants 'reinforced the need for protective measures' to help extinguish the virus.

Mr Hancock told the Commons: 'The study published today shows us hope that we can crack this.'

However, he again defied calls for the 10pm curfew on pubs to be lifted amid claims it is doing 'more harm than good'. Mr Hancock's positive message on the findings of the study contrasted sharply with the grim message from Boris Johnson, Chris Whitty and Patrick Vallance at a Downing Street press conference last night.

The PM and his senior medical and science advisers warned that the outbreak was 'going in the wrong direction' – even though it is understood they were aware of the latest Imperial findings in advance.

Liverpool had been braced for more measures to curb a recent rise in infections that has left it with the highest rolling seven-day rate of new cases at 258 per 100,000, while nearby Knowsley is second at 262.

In addition, Luton, Wakefield, Chester, East and West Cheshire, Barrow-in-Furness and Rotherham have been added to the Government's watchlist as 'areas of concern'.

And Sheffield has been moved up to an area of 'enhanced support', suggesting it could be the next to be placed in lockdown.

Areas of concern are the focus of targeted actions to reduce the prevalence of coronavirus, for example receiving additional testing in care homes and increased community engagement with high-risk groups.

Areas for enhanced support are those at a medium-high risk of intervention where there is a more detailed plan, agreed with the national authorities.

Labour leader Sir Keir Starmer called for a 'rapid review' of the local lockdown strategy and urged the Government to consider whether the 10pm curfew should remain.

'We have supported these restrictions, but we have now got – after this morning's announcement – over 50 areas in local restrictions and over the weeks and months only one area has come out of these restrictions,' he said.

'So we need a strategy, a road map, people need to have hope that this is going to work.'

He told reporters at Westminster that the Government needed to 'massively improve' the way it communicated and provide economic support for areas at the same time restrictions were imposed.

'I think we need a rapid review of the local lockdowns because what we are seeing is that in some areas in lockdown the infection rates are going up, not down.

'That's worrying and there needs to be a review into that. In other areas they have been in local lockdown for months and so there needs to be a rapid review – what's working, what isn't working, what does the science tell us about that.'

Speaking in the Commons, Mr Hancock was repeatedly challenged over the blanket 10pm curfew on pubs and restaurants in England.

There were complaints that people have been causing issues by piling out of venues and going to the supermarket for more alcohol, or having house parties instead.

But Mr Hancock said: 'Of course, we keep this under review and of course we're constantly looking at how we can improve these policies, but I think we've got to look at both sides of the evidence to try to get this right.'

He added: 'We know that sustained contact, especially in crowded, poorly ventilated spaces is a driver of infection and pubs and bars an obvious risk.

'So I heard what he said about the 10pm rule, but my concerns relate to everybody leaving the pub at the same time.'

Warrington Borough Council leader Russ Bowden said: 'These restrictions are disappointing for our town but are, again, a necessary response in helping us to drive down the number of case of coronavirus in Warrington.

'Now more than ever, we need to do all we can to stop the spread of the virus.'

He added: 'I'm aware the Government has announced a support package for affected councils as part of the announcement of these new restrictions.

'I await the detail on what this funding could mean but it's clear that, as part of these strict new measures, we need to do all we can to support affected businesses – not least our hospitality industry which will, again, be seriously impacted by these new restrictions.

'We will, therefore, continue to work closely with Government and press them for the support our hospitality sector needs during this increasingly difficult period.'

Earlier, Liverpool Mayor Joe Anderson called for a two-week 'circuit-breaker' lockdown to restrict the virus from spreading.

But his colleague, Metro Mayor Steve Rotherham, repeated his opposition to the proposal, which he insisted was never discussed as an option when he spoke to Chief Medical Officer Chris Whitty.

The elected mayor of Middlesbrough said he was prepared to defy the Government and reject new coronavirus measures imposed on the town in what was thought to be a first for an authority figure.

Independent Andy Preston was furious with the new rules which go further than he and his counterparts in Hartlepool had lobbied for earlier in the week.

Simon Clarke, Conservative MP for Middlesbrough South and East Cleveland, had been opposed to extra measures and spoke in the Commons earlier about the need for a clear exit strategy.

In response to the new rules, he said: 'I would like to personally thank Mr Hancock for ensuring that a clear, evidence-led exit strategy has been included in the measures imposed on Middlesbrough.

'I was clear in my opposition to any further local restrictions at this time, especially seen as the latest national restrictions had not had even a week to bed in.

'And while I respectfully disagreed with the decision of Middlesbrough mayor Andy Preston to request a local lockdown in Middlesbrough, I am in no doubt that he acted in good faith in making this request of the Government.

'So now we are where we are, our focus must shift to protecting the most vulnerable members of our society.'

Andy McDonald, Labour MP for Middlesbrough, said the new measures were 'inevitable'.

He said: 'I've said before that no one welcomes further restrictions, but we on Teesside sit next to seven neighbouring North East local authorities where tighter restrictions have been imposed for some time now because of worryingly high rates of Covid-19.

The weekly infection rate in Liverpool now stands at 258.4 per 100,000 people

The weekly infection rate in Liverpool now stands at 258.4 per 100,000 people

The north west of England, which has seen areas such as Burnley and Liverpool (pictured today) placed under local restrictions, had the highest levels of infection while the number of infections

The north west of England, which has seen areas such as Burnley and Liverpool (pictured today) placed under local restrictions, had the highest levels of infection while the number of infections

HOW HAS THE CORONAVIRUS OUTBREAK CHANGED?

The REACT study, run by Imperial College London and funded by the Department of Health, has been tracking England's Covid-19 outbreak throughout the summer.

The prevalence of the virus is based on what proportion of people tested have a positive result, and is used to work out what percentage of people in the country currently have the virus.

This is how the data shows the change in England's outbreak:

Round three: July 24 – August 11

  • Prevalence: 0.04% (one in 2,500)
  • Estimated R rate: 1.3
  • Tests done: 161,560
  • Positive results: 54

Round four: August 20 – September 8

  • Prevalence: 0.13% (one in 769)
  • Estimated R rate: 1.7
  • Tests done: 154,325
  • Positive results: 137

Round five: September 18 – 25

  • Prevalence: 0.55% (one in 181)
  • Estimated R rate: 1.06
  • Tests done: 84,610 (ongoing)
  • Positive results: 363

The most recent round of results from REACT provides estimates for the prevalence of the virus in different regions across England as follows:

  • North West: 0.86% (1 in 116 people)
  • North East: 0.78% (1 in 128)
  • Yorkshire & Humber: 0.54% (1 in 185)
  • London: 0.49% (1 in 204)
  • East Midlands: 0.44% (1 in 227)
  • West Midlands: 0.38% (1 in 263)
  • East of England: 0.31% (1 in 323)
  • South West: 0.25% (1 in 400)
  • South East: 0.24% (1 in 417)

'It's only 13 miles from Middlesbrough to Sedgefield in County Durham and the virus is clearly in circulation right across the North East region at levels that are concerning and the virus pays no heed to the local authority borders between County Durham and the Tees Valley local authority areas.'

At the press conference last night, the PM dismissed pressure from many Tories to change strategy and focus on protecting jobs, saying he would not 'throw in the sponge'.

There has been increasing anxiety – including in Cabinet – about following the ultra-cautious approach from Prof Whitty and Sir Patrick. One senior minister told MailOnline that the government was now 'talking more widely to people with different views'.

While the rate of infection appears to be falling, the study, commissioned by the Department of Health, found that of the volunteers tested between September 18-26, one in 200 people had coronavirus.

It also revealed the virus to be spreading more among young people, while simultaneously laying bare the North-South divide, pointing to the North West as the epicentre of the UK's outbreak.

Professor Paul Elliott, Director of the School of Public Health Program at Imperial, said, “While our latest findings show some early evidence that the growth of new cases has slowed, suggesting that efforts to control the infection are working, is the prevalence of The infection is the highest that we have recorded so far.

"This reinforces the need for protective measures to limit the spread of the disease and public compliance with these measures. This will be vital in minimizing other significant diseases and deaths from Covid-19."

Asked whether the Prime Minister and his advisers would have seen this study before their downbeat TV briefing yesterday, Professor Elliot said 'yes'.

'We report in weekly to Government and so they are aware of these statistics from our study,' he said this morning. 'Clearly there are a range of stats that are considered by Government and we're just one area.'

But he did not agree that the tone of the briefing should have been more optimistic, and said: 'I thought the messaging was very good yesterday. We've got to really quite high levels of the virus.

'One in 200 people who are walking the streets today, on average, (would) test positive for the virus. It's not dependent on the testing system (and) it's not just symptomatic people.

'I think people have begun to hear the message since the beginning of September. The rate of increase of the virus at the beginning for September was alarming… now we've got to high rates we've really got to do something about it and that was the message yesterday. The rate of rise may have slowed and that's the first step.'

Professor Steven Riley agreed and added: 'This (study) is entirely consistent with the messaging yesterday – 100 per cent consistent with the messaging. All the public health measures that are in place right now are absolutely crucial…

'If we were reporting it we would very much comment on the prevalence. It (the messaging) has to go negative for us to avoid substantial numbers of hospitalisations and deaths.'

Politicians in the region met with Mr Hancock last night, with the final decision taken after a meeting chaired by Prime Minister Boris Johnson this morning.

Mr Anderson said measures to restrict travel, in place in some areas of Wales, had not been put forward, but he believed the Government was considering measures to ensure restaurants only take bookings.

Environment Secretary George Eustice told BBC Breakfast: 'I know that there are some discussions, I understand, that are going on about the situation in Liverpool, but no decisions have been taken yet.

'It's not really possible for me to say what they may or may not do since I think there's currently dialogue between health officials and the local council there.'

Halton MP Derek Twigg said he and other local MPs had 'demanded' a meeting with the Health Minister.

In a statement released on Wednesday evening, Mr Twigg said: 'I raised several concerns and issues and asked for evidence and data on the impact of Covid-19 on our area.

'I was assured that a decision has not yet been taken on the further local restrictions we may face but it is likely to be decided tomorrow.'

Local leaders have called for the Government to provide financial support if it brings in stricter restrictions.

In a joint statement, Liverpool City Region metro mayor Steve Rotheram and the leaders of Liverpool, Sefton, Wirral, St Helens, Halton and Knowsley authorities have called for the Government to work with them, provide financial support and increase testing capacity.

They said: 'Throughout the pandemic, we have always put the health of our residents first and we will continue to do everything we can to stop the spread of coronavirus and keep as many people as possible safe.

The REACT study shows that prevalence of the coronavirus has surged in all regions over the summer, with the North of England worst affected. Pictured: The graphs show different phases of the study, starting with May in the top left and September in the bottom right. Darker colours show higher rates of Covid-19

The REACT study shows that prevalence of the coronavirus has surged in all regions over the summer, with the North of England worst affected. Pictured: The graphs show different phases of the study, starting with May in the top left and September in the bottom right. Darker colours show higher rates of Covid-19

The prevalence of Covid-19 varies widely across different regions of England but is not lower than one case per 400 people in any part of the nation, the researchers said. It is highest in the North West, where almost one in 100 people are carrying the disease

The prevalence of Covid-19 varies widely across different regions of England but is not lower than one case per 400 people in any part of the nation, the researchers said. It is highest in the North West, where almost one in 100 people are carrying the disease

The Imperial College London's predictions of the prevalence of Covid-19 - the percentage of people who have the illness - rose sharply in September (illustrated by the pink lines)

The Imperial College London's predictions of the prevalence of Covid-19 – the percentage of people who have the illness – rose sharply in September (illustrated by the pink lines)

'However, at the same time, we must be clear that any further restrictions will deal a hammer blow to our economy.'

Revellers in Liverpool make their way home earlier this week after partying until the 10pm curfew

Revellers in Liverpool make their way home earlier this week after partying until the 10pm curfew

North Wales lockdown: What are the new restrictions from 6pm tonight and how long could they last?

Where are the lockdowns being imposed?

The Welsh Government has announced Denbighshire, Flintshire, Conwy and Wrexham will be placed under local lockdowns from 6pm on Thursday.

Announcing the new measures, health minister Vaughan Gething said: 'It's always difficult to make the decision to impose restrictions but we hope that these measures will make a positive difference – just as we have seen in Caerphilly and Newport, where local residents have pulled together and followed the rules.'

What are the new restrictions?

Under the new measures, people under lockdown will not be allowed to enter or leave the county in which they live without a reasonable excuse, such as travel for work or education.

People will also only be able to meet people they do not live with outdoors and will not be able to form, or be in, extended households.

How many people will be affected?

The local lockdown will affect around 504,000 people and will bring the number of people in Wales under lockdown to more than 2.3 million.

It means 16 areas of the country will face some form of extra restrictions, with the majority of the other areas under lockdown located in South Wales.

Why are the measures being brought in?

The Welsh Government said the local lockdowns are being imposed after people meeting indoors, not following social-distancing guidelines and returning from summer holidays overseas with the virus led to a surge in cases.

Mr Gething said: 'These are largely linked to people socialising indoors and are the pattern of transmission similar to what we have seen in South Wales.

'We have worked closely with local authority leaders and the police in North Wales and we all agree about the need to take swift action to control the spread of the virus.'

How long will the lockdowns last?

While there is no definitive answer as to how long the new restrictions will be in place, authorities have said they will be under 'constant review'.

Councillor Mark Pritchard, leader of Wrexham County Borough Council, said: 'It's a balance between people's health and the economy, and we have to do everything we can to get it right.

'These measures will be kept under constant review as we look to control the spread of the virus in the counties of Conwy, Denbighshire, Flintshire and Wrexham.'

Four Welsh local authority areas – Denbighshire, Flintshire, Conwy and Wrexham – will go into lockdown at 6pm tonight, with people banned from meeting anyone outside their household indoors.

People will also be forbidden to enter or leave the county in which they live without a reasonable excuse, such as travel for work or education.

In North Wales, the new local lockdown will affect around 504,000 people and will bring the number of people in the country under lockdown to more than 2.3 million.

It means 16 areas of the country will face some form of extra restrictions, with the majority of the other areas under lockdown located in South Wales.

This morning, Jim Jones of North Wales Tourism said he had seen no evidence that visitors were responsible for the spread and warned the lockdown would devastate local businesses.

'Business are extremely and understandably frustrated, it's another dark day,' he told BBC Radio Wales Breakfast.

'They have invested so much time and gone to extraordinary measures to be Covid-compliant and make everybody safe and then all of a sudden they've got to cancel bookings and tell visitors to go home.'

The North East was made subject to new restrictions yesterday morning, with people banned from meeting anyone inside unless they are part of their Covid bubble. However this stopped short of a full lockdown that would shut pubs and restaurants.

It comes as Boris Johnson was bolstered by new figures showing the Covid infection rate has started slowing since restrictions were tightened.

In the strongest evidence yet that local lockdowns are working, results from the largest Covid-19 study in England found the R-rate fell from 1.7 to around 1.1 this month.

The director of the study at Imperial College London and Ipsos Mori said the interim results of 80,000 participants "heightened the need for protective measures" to eradicate the virus.

That restrictions appear to help contain the spread of Covid-19 will help the prime minister impose curbs to smooth the second wave.

The trio presented maps that made the divide between north and south coronaviruses clear. Official data shows that the average number of positive tests per day in North West England is at least twice that of any other region and that Scotland's cases are 14 times higher than in early August, beating the outbreak in England.

An average of 1,595 cases of Covid-19 are currently diagnosed daily in the Northwest, compared to just 150 in the Southwest, while Yorkshire, Humber and Northeast have the second highest infection rates. All 10 areas with the worst per capita ratios are in the north, while eight out of ten areas with the lowest are in the south. Professor Whitty said there is a "strong concentration" of coronavirus towards the top of England.

In an appeal to the public, the Prime Minister said: "If we work together now, we will give ourselves the best possible chance to avoid this result and avoid further action."

“I know some people will think we should give up and let the virus run its course, despite the enormous death that it could potentially cause. I have to say that I deeply disagree. I don't think the British people want that. I don't think they want to throw the sponge in. They want to fight and defeat this virus and we will. & # 39;

“Even as we fight Covid, it's important that people get the treatment they need for other diseases. But I have to be clear if the NHS were overwhelmed by Covid then no one could get such care. & # 39;

Sir Patrick highlighted the surge in infections and defended his recent comments warning that there could be 50,000 coronavirus cases a day in the UK by mid-October. He said grimly, "Things are definitely going in the wrong direction."

Professor Whitty hit back critics, saying they accused him of being "too optimistic and too pessimistic about numbers". But he said that in March the government failed to realize how quickly the virus was spreading and the bug could not be repeated. In somber news he said: "We have a long winter ahead of us."

Matt Hancock slammed over Vitamin D blunder

Health Secretary Matt Hancock was told to 'get his facts straight' today after shooting down vitamin D as a potential coronavirus treatment despite a growing body of evidence from around the world suggesting it works.

Experts have for months been calling for officials to look into the immune system-boosting nutrient's effect on Covid-19 patients after a mountain of research showed a link to vitamin D deficiency.

Mr Hancock told the House of Commons last week he had green-lit a Government-funded 'trial' investigating vitamin D and that it did not 'appear to have any impact'.

But officials have since admitted that no clinical trials had taken place and claim it was a slip of the tongue from the health secretary – who was also staunchly opposed to face masks in the spring and claimed they were 'extremely weak' in stopping Covid-19's spread.

According to national surveys in the UK, roughly one in five people have low vitamin D levels, the equivalent of 13million Brits.

Mr Hancock has now agreed to meet experts to to hear the growing case for the vitamin, which the body produces when exposed to the sun. But his flippant dismissal of vitamin D has sparked fury among scientists and MPs who today said time is running out for ministers to act, as levels of the 'sunshine vitamin' drop dramatically in autumn and winter.

Experts said his comments 'displayed incredible ignorance', while Liberal Democrat MP Layla Morgan told MailOnline the secretary of state 'needs to be listening, not dismissing'. She added: 'I hope Matt Hancock will take a less flippant approach to potential treatments in future and get his facts straight before making such comments. We're in a crisis, it's time for politicians to stop playing science and listen to the experts.'

The data presented by Professor Whitty in the televised briefing showed a clear north-south divide between coronavirus infections across England.

The scientific advisors admitted that the upper half of the country is significantly more affected than the lower half, but insisted that the problem is not nationwide.

A heat map of infection rates across the country showed that almost all of the Southwest, Southeast, East Midlands and East of England were shaded in the lightest possible color, meaning the number of cases is below the England average.

The average infection rate for the entire country was 35.7 cases per 100,000, as in the last official update from Public Health England last Friday.

The color coding showed that the problem is worst in the northwest around Liverpool and Manchester and in the far northeast towards Newcastle.

Much of these two regions and the West Midlands – and to a lesser extent London and Cornwall – have been shown in a darker color, indicating that the fall rates are near or above average.

Professor Whitty said: “At this point there is a very high concentration in certain areas – particularly the North West, the North East and parts of the Midlands …

“There has been a general increase (in the rate of infection) across England, and so has Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland. However, there has been a very rapid increase in certain areas. again, especially in the Northeast, Northwest, and Midlands areas (but not exclusively). & # 39;

The number of positive tests reported by the Ministry of Health will reflect the information on the card. The northwest reports significantly more cases than any other region.

In the week leading up to September 23 – the latest available data – an average of 1,595 cases per day were diagnosed in the crisis region.

This was more than double the daily average of 663 in Yorkshire and Humber, three times that of 564 in the West Midlands and 551 in the Northeast.

It blows the southern regions except London (471 per day) out of the water.

In the East Midlands there were 274 cases per day over the same seven day period, 227 in the South East, 185 in the East of England and only 150 in the South West.

This means that the looming threat of a national lockdown, which Mr Johnson yesterday said he didn't want to resort to but would if he had to, places millions of people at risk of being lumped under tight restrictions because of the actions of people hundreds of miles away.

MEPs have already warned against a "broad brush tactic" in which people in less affected areas are wrongly punished.

But Sir Patrick Vallance insisted: 'It would be wrong to take from this that this is a problem that's only in certain areas.

"It's worse in certain areas, but there are signs of spread everywhere and we need to be aware of this and everyone must take precautions across the country."

Bars and restaurants could be forced to shut in Liverpool (pictured: People in the city enjoy a drink outside yesterday) as part of a circuit-breaker lockdown

Bars and restaurants could be forced to shut in Liverpool (pictured: People in the city enjoy a drink outside yesterday) as part of a circuit-breaker lockdown

Official data for Liverpool, with Covid cases from September 21 to 27 broken down by age and sex

Official data for Liverpool, with Covid cases from September 21 to 27 broken down by age and sex

Liverpool John Moores University's campus has remained quarantine-free, despite footage of a huge booze-fuelled rave in an accommodation hall surfacing today

Liverpool John Moores University's campus has remained quarantine-free, despite footage of a huge booze-fuelled rave in an accommodation hall surfacing today

The map of Britain's coronavirus rules: As confusion reigns, where can you meet friends for a pint inside or outside? And will the lockdown police ask you for a 'reasonable excuse'?

Britain's complex coronavirus rules have confused even the Prime Minister as numerous different restrictions are put in place across the country to try and keep the number of coronavirus cases down.

Aside from the standard rules in England, eight different regions have additional restrictions or rules that differ from those in place in England.

In total around 16.6m people in the UK are subject to local lockdowns, one quarter of the population.

Among the subtle differences are those between different local lockdown areas in England. For example in the North East, residents are legally banned from meeting people from outside their households inside pubs – but are free to do so outdoors.

In Bolton pubs and restaurants have been closed completely and can do takeout only while funerals and weddings are limited to six people. In the North East the weddings and funeral limit remains 15.

The devolved regions also have different rules. The rule of six applies to children in England, but not to under 12s in Scotland and under-11s in Wales.

In Scotland the rule of six is limited to people from two households in Scotland. Residents are not allowed to host guests in their own homes, if the guests are from outside their household or support bubble.

In Wales the rule of six is limited to people of up to four households indoors. Outdoors, people can gather in groups of up to 30 but should maintain social distancing from people from other households.

In Welsh local lockdown areas people can meet in their own gardens in groups of up to 30, but in English local lockdown areas the rules apply to gardens as a well as inside homes. Welsh people are also banned from leaving local lockdown areas unless they have a 'reasonable excuse'.

Welsh wedding ceremonies do not have a limit on the number of attendees, but they must wear masks including the bride and groom. Welsh wedding receptions are limited to 30 people.

These are the rules:

England:

Social gatherings

No more than six people are permitted to gather indoors or outdoors – with a few exceptions, which include going to school, work, or 'exceptional life events'.

Children are not exempt from the rules, unlike in Wales and Scotland

Breaking these new restrictions mean fines of £200 (£100 if paid within 14 days), doubling for each incident up to £3,200.

Pubs and Restaurants

Pubs and restaurants across England must close at 10pm. The rule of six still applies but applies to each group inside – not the venue as a whole.

Venues are now 'legally required' to take and keep the contact details of a member from every group of visitors for 21 days. This is so they can pass them on to NHS Test and Trace 'without delay' if needed.

The hospitality venue could face a fine if it fails to stick to the Covid security standards and the Government pledged to back local authorities to make 'further and faster use of their powers' against venues who break the rules.

Covid-19 secure venues, such as places of worship, restaurants and hospitality venues, can still host larger numbers in total but groups of up to six must not mix or form larger groups.

travel

The rule of six limit does not apply to strangers gathering in the same space, such as a train or bus.

Government guidelines say: 'You can help control coronavirus and travel safely by walking and cycling, if you can. However, where this is not possible, you can use public transport or drive.

'If you do use public transport, you must wear a face covering and you should follow the safer travel guidance for passengers.'

Schools

Face masks not required in schools outside local lockdown areas. Face masks are required for school pupils in Year 7 or above in communal areas in areas where local lockdowns are in place.

Work

The six person limit does not apply to gatherings for work. Offices should take steps to ensure social distancing is maintained.

The government initially urged workers to return to the office, but has since U-turned and called for anyone who can work from home to do so to try to drive down the number of cases.

Sports

You can continue to take part in organised sporting or licensed physical activity in groups of more than 6 outdoors and up to 6 people indoors (for over 18s).

Organised dance and exercise classes can take place in groups of more than six, but you must not mix with more than five other participants.

Masks

Face coverings have to be worn on public transport, in shops and supermarkets. They are also needed in other indoor venues such as museums, cinemas, galleries and places of worship.

The government also advised people to where them wherever they cannot keep to social distancing guidelines.

Hospitality and retail workers now have to wear face coverings at work, as well as passengers in taxis.

Weddings and Funerals

Weddings are limited to 15 people and funerals are limited to 30 people. Staff working at these events are not included.

North East and Liverpool:

Seven local authorities in the North East and Liverpool are subject to some of the strictest restrictions, which came into force on Wednesday. The affected areas are:

  • Durham
  • Gateshead
  • Newcastle
  • Northumberland
  • North Tyneside
  • South Tyneside
  • Sunderland
  • Liverpool
  • Warrington
  • Hartlepool
  • Middlesborough

How are the rules different to the rest of England?

Social gatherings

Residents are legally banned from meeting friends who are not in their household or support bubble indoors. This includes in their homes or gardens, pubs and restaurants. But it does not include anywhere outdoors including pub beer gardens.

The police will be able to take action against those who break these rules, including asking people to disperse and issuing fixed penalty notices starting at £200 for those who participate in illegal gatherings.

While the rules do not ban people from meeting under the rule of six outside, the government advice states residents should not 'socialise with people you do not live with'. It also advises against visiting care home residents.

Pubs and Restaurants

Hospitality venues also have to close at 10pm like the rest of the country. It is against the law to sit in a pub with someone you do not live with or is in your bubble.

travel

Public transport is restricted to 'essential trips', be it work or school or looking after an elderly relative. Going outside the area is also restricted to 'essential' reasons.

But this is not law, this is just government advice so it is left to people to judge for themselves what is essential.

Schools

Face masks are required for school pupils in Year 7 or above in communal areas in areas.

Work

Same as the rest of England

Masks

Same as the rest of England

Sports

Sports can be played outdoors with more than six people, but indoors they are limited to six people out of only one 'one household and support bubble', the government say.

Organised dance and exercise classes can take place in groups of more than 6 outdoors, where a risk assessment has been carried out, but you must not mix with more than five other participants.

Weddings and Funerals

Same as the rest of the country.

Bolton*

Bolton was put under tighter lockdown measures on September 5 as the stubborn infection rate remained high. At one point the rate increased to 99 cases per 100,000 people per week, which was the highest in England.

Social gatherings

People are not allowed to host people from outside their own household or support bubble in their houses or garden.

Meeting outside is allowed, but pubs and restaurants are closed.

Pubs and Restaurants

Pubs in Bolton are shut to stem a flare-up in infections. They can only serve takeaway, and are obliged to close completely between 10pm and 5am.

travel

People can travel in and out of Bolton for work, education reason or other excuses deemed 'essential'.

Schools

Face masks are required for school pupils in Year 7 or above in communal areas in areas.

Work

Same as rest of England.

Masks

Same as rest of England.

Sports

You can continue to take part in organised sporting or licensed physical activity in groups of more than 6 outdoors and up to 6 people indoors (for over 18s).

Weddings and Funerals

In Bolton, a maximum of 6 people should to attend these events. The government says this should be limited to close family of the people getting married or the person who has died, or people who live(d) or formed a support bubble with them. A close friend can attend a funeral only if there are no household members or immediate families.

*rules change to the same as North West on 2 October

Northern and Southern Wales

From 6pm on Thursday, residents of Denbighshire, Flintshire, Conwy and Wrexham will be banned from mixing indoors with other households – affecting 500,000 people. The full list of Welsh areas in lockdown include:

  • Carmarthensire
  • Swansea
  • Neath Port Talbot
  • Bridgend
  • Rhondda Cynon Taf
  • Merhtyr Tydfil
  • Caerphilly
  • Blaenau Gwent
  • Torfaen
  • Newport
  • Cardiff
  • Vale of Glamorgan
  • Bridgend
  • Conwy
  • Denbighshire
  • Flintshire
  • Wrexham

How do the rules differ from England?

Social gatherings:

In the Welsh local lockdown areas meeting anyone from outside your own household indoors is banned.

Meeting them in gardens or outdoors is allowed.

However people are allowed to gather in groups of thirty outdoors – including in private gardens.

Outside the local lockdown areas, the rule of six applies indoors in Wales but is limited to people from four different households.

The rule of six in Wales applies only to children 11 and over.

travel

In the Welsh local lockdown areas travel to another area is banned unless an individual can provide a 'reasonable excuse'. This can include going to school or work.

If the individual cannot provide a reasonable excuse they can be fined and prosecuted by the courts.

Pubs and Restaurants

Pubs and restaurants must close at 10pm and can provide table service only.

Schools

Schools are unaffected by the Welsh local lockdowns. All children over 11 are advised to wear masks in indoor public areas.

Work

The Welsh local lockdowns do not affect the rules on working from home. The Welsh government advises employees to work from home wherever possible and should not return to the work place unless there is a 'clearly demonstrated' need for them to do so.

Masks

The Welsh government legally requires face masks in indoor public places for all people over the age of 11.

Weddings and funerals

Attendees at Welsh weddings and funerals are required to wear face masks. This includes the bride and groom who can remove their masks to kiss.

There is no limit on the size of the ceremonies. Receptions and wakes are limited to 30 people.

Sports

Organised outdoor outdoor sport is allowed but 'social disatncing must be maintained at all times and particiapnts are limited to 30 people.

Gyms and leisure centres can remain open but users must wear masks when not performing strenuous exercise. Indoor sports that cannot be socially distanced are banned.

Cycling is allowed but only within the boundary of the local lockdown area.

The rest of Wales

Other areas in Wales have so far managed to steer clear of new restrictions but are still subject to the Welsh rules.

How do the rules differ from England?

Social gatherings

The rule of six applies indoors in Wales but is limited to people from four different households. However people are allowed to gather in groups of thirty outdoors – including in private gardens.

The rule of six in Wales applies only to children 11 and over.

travel

People from the rest of Wales are not allowed to travel into the local lockdown areas unless they have a 'reasonable excuse'

They are allowed to go on holiday or travel for other 'legitimate' reasons.

Pubs and Restaurants

Pubs and restaurants must close at 10pm and can provide table service only

Schools

All children over 11 are advised to wear masks in indoor public areas.

Work

The Welsh government advises employees to work from home wherever possible and should not return to the work place unless there is a 'clearly demonstarted' need for them to do so.

Masks

The Welsh government requires face masks in indoor public places for all people over the age of 11.

Weddings and funerals

Attendees at Welsh weddings and funerals are required to wear face masks. This includes the bride and groom who can remove their masks to kiss.

There is no limit on the size of the ceremonies. Receptions and wakes are limited to 30 people.

Sports

Organised outdoor outdoor sport is allowed but 'social distancing must be maintained at all times and participants are limited to 30 people.

Gyms and leisure centres can remain open but users must wear masks when not performing strenuous exercise. Indoor sports that cannot be socially distanced are banned.

Schottland

First Minister Nicola Sturgeon last week took the Covid-19 response a step further in Scotland, proving to be moving more cautiously than neighbouring England once again. Areas in lockdown north of the border are:

  • West Dunbartonshire
  • East Dunbartonshire
  • Glasgow City
  • Renfrewshire
  • East Renfrewshire
  • South Lanarkshire
  • North Lanarkshire

How do the rules differ from England?

Social gatherings

The rule of six applies indoors and outdoors in Scotland, but it also has a limit of individuals from two households.

Residents of Scotland are not allowed to host people from outside their own household in their own homes. They can host people in their garden but must abide by the above rule of six.

Pubs and Restaurants

People are allowed to meet in pub beer gardens – six people from a maximum of two households. They close at 10pm.

travel

Same as England.

Schools

Face masks are mandatory in communal areas of secondary schools.

Work

Everyone who can work from home should do. Non-essential offices and call centres should not yet re-open.

Masks

People have to wear face coverings in: aquariums, indoor zoos or visitor farms, and any other indoor tourist, heritage or cultural site, banks, building societies and credit unions, cinemas, community centres, crematoriums and funeral directors, libraries, museums and galleries, places of worship, post offices, storage and distribution facilities, including collection and drop off points, bingo halls, casinos, bowling alleys, amusement arcades and other leisure facilities (such as snooker and pool halls), indoor funfairs, indoor fitness studios, gyms, swimming pools or other indoor leisure centres, indoor skating rinks.

Sports

People can take part in organized outdoor sport. Indoors, contact sports are not allowed and social distancing must be maintained.

Weddings and Funerals

Weddings, civil partnership ceremonies and funerals should have no more than 20 people indoors or outdoors.

North West

Twenty-six other areas in the North are subject to some restrictions. The affected areas are:

  • Blackburn
  • Blackpool
  • Burnley
  • Chorley
  • Fylde
  • Halton
  • Hyndburn
  • Knowsley
  • Lancaster
  • Liverpool
  • Pendle
  • Preston
  • Ribble Valley
  • Rossendale
  • Sefton
  • South Ribble
  • St Helens
  • West Lancashire
  • Wirral
  • Wyre
  • Bradford
  • Calderdale
  • Kirklees
  • Leeds
  • Greater Manchester

Social gatherings

People are not allowed to host people from outside their own household or support bubble in their houses or garden.

The police will be able to take action against those who break these rules, including asking people to disperse and issuing fixed penalty notices starting at £200 for those who participate in illegal gatherings. (£100 if paid within 14 days).

While the rules do not ban people from meeting under the rule of six in pubs or restaurants, the government has issued advice that states  residents should not 'socialise with people you do not live with'. It also advises against visiting care home residents.

Pubs and Restaurants

Pubs and restaurants must shut at 10pm. The guidelines advise that social contact with other households should be avoided in, restaurants, cafes, shops, places of worship, community centres, leisure and entertainment venues, or visitor attractions and parks. But it is not banned.

travel

Within most of the North West lockdown public transport is restricted to 'essential trips', be it work or school or looking after an elderly relative. Going outside the area is also restricted to 'essential' reasons.

But this is not law, this is just government advice so it is left to people to judge for themselves what is essential.

The Greater Manchester area is exempt, apart from Oldham where residents have been instructed to avoid using public transport and instead walk or cycle where they can.

Listing acceptable reasons for locals to catch a bus, train or tram, the government website includes: to get to and from work; to get essential food or medical supplies including click and collect services; to support someone who is vulnerable, if no one else can do so; to travel to and from the homes of others in your support bubble; to attend an early years setting, school or college, or to accompany a child who is attending an early years setting, school or college, where necessary; to fulfil legal obligations; to seek medical care, or avoid illness, injury or harm.

Residents can still go on holiday wherever they choose – subject to following the Foreign Office travel guidance – as long as they only go with people in their bubble.

Schools

Face masks are required for school pupils in Year 7 or above in communal areas in areas.

Work

Same as rest of England.

Masks

Same as rest of England.

Sports

Same as rest of England.

Weddings and Funerals

Same as rest of England.

West Midlands

Britain's second largest city and three surrounding areas were placed into a local lockdown two weeks ago amid concerns the restrictions will spread to other regions.

  • Birmingham
  • Sandwell
  • Solihull
  • Wolverhampton

Social gatherings

People are not allowed to host people from outside their own household or support bubble in their houses or garden.

Meeting outside and in pubs is allowed but only under the rule of six.

Pubs and Restaurants

Pubs and restaurants must shut at 10pm.

travel

If you live in the affected area, you can travel outside them. But you must not meet people you do not live with in their home or garden, whether inside or outside of the affected areas, unless they are in your support bubble.

Schools

Face masks are required for school pupils in Year 7 or above in communal areas in areas.

Work

Same as the rest of England.

Masks

Same as the rest of England.

Sports

Same as the rest of England.

Weddings and Funerals

Same as the rest of England.

Covid situation

Coronavirus cases are on the rise across Birmingham, with 12,995 pupils and 714 teachers back home self-isolating.

112 of the city's schools have seen infections since reopening to students at the start of this month.

Leicester

The Department of Health and Social Care yesterday tweaked the rules in place for Leicester's localised lockdown, with the changes also applying to:

  • Leicester city
  • Oadby
  • Wigston

Social gatherings

People are not allowed to host people from outside their own household or support bubble in their houses or garden.

Meeting outside and in pubs is allowed but only under the rule of six.

Leicester is the only area in the country that has had to remain under addition measures since the rest of the country was lifted from lockdown on July 4.

Vulnerable residents have been told to remain shielding until October 5.

After this date formal shielding will be paused in the area, and Leicester City Council will take over advising the local population on what to do.

Pubs and Restaurants

Same as the rest of England.

travel

Same as the rest of England.

Schools

Face masks are required for school pupils in Year 7 or above in communal areas in areas. Parents have been asked to wear masks on the school run.

Work

Same as the rest of England.

Masks

Same as the rest of England.

Sports

Same as the rest of England.

Weddings and Funerals

Same as the rest of England.

Are there any loopholes?

Despite vast swathes of England, Scotland and Wales being under some form of local lockdown, there are some loopholes people could exploit.

Get a pint after 10pm

Punters can still get their hands on a draft pint after 10pm if they use establishments at motorway services because they are classed as an essential service.

The Hope and Champion is a Wetherspoon at Beaconsfield Services on the M40, in Buckinghamshire is one pub that can still legally serve after the curfew lasting until 5am. It provides food and drink for those on the roads, so now remains open later than other pubs.

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