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Matt Hancock admits that the British are "very likely" to face annual blasts of Covid


Matt Hancock said it is "very likely" that Brits will need a Covid shot every year for the "foreseeable" future, as he also announced that 200,000 people a day are now receiving their first dose of the sting.

The health minister said the UK could require a "double vaccination program" with annual bumps to protect against flu and coronavirus.

It is warned today by a leading public expert that many of 90 percent of Britons would need to be protected from the virus in order to achieve a heard immunity.

Professor Devi Sridhar said such a roll-out would last until next fall. She warned that scientists who are still unsure how long the vaccination will last, the people now vaccinated could lose their immunity by that time.

In another strike against the British, another expert said normal life in the UK may not resume even after vaccinating the most vulnerable people. It is "likely" that social distancing could still exist by the end of the year.

However, in a glimmer of hope, Mr Hancock announced today that the introduction of vaccination in the UK is on track to hit up to 2 million bursts per week.

He said the UK is now vaccinating 200,000 people a day and is rapidly approaching the rate needed to cover the most vulnerable by mid-February.

And in another push, the Minister of Health announced today that every adult would be offered – but not given – a Covid shock by the fall.

The health minister said the UK could require a "double vaccination program" with annual bumps to protect against flu and coronavirus

According to Matt Hancock (pictured) it is

Professor Devi Sridhar (pictured) warned that many of 90 percent of Britons would have to be protected from the virus in order to achieve a heard immunity

According to Matt Hancock (picture left) it is "very likely" that the British will need a Covid vaccination every year for the "foreseeable" future. Professor Devi Sridhar (pictured right) warned that many of 90 percent of Britons would need to be protected from the virus in order to achieve audible immunity

Speaking to Sophie Ridge on Sky News, he said, “There are currently over 200,000 people being vaccinated every day.

"We've now vaccinated around a third of people over 80 in this country. So we're making significant progress, but there is more expansion."

He said efforts would be further heightened with the opening of mass vaccination centers across the country this week.

Great Britain must NOW go into a lockdown based on the Asian model, in which places of worship are closed, hotels are used as isolation centers and masks are used in every public space, experts warn

Britain must now go into an Asian-style lockdown where kindergartens and places of worship are closed and hotels are used as isolation centers and masks in any public space, experts have warned.

Former WHO director Anthony Costello said only "a total clampdown" would stop the mutant strain of coronavirus that is pervading the country.

UCL Operations Research Professor Christina Pagel added that she believes current lockdown restrictions are likely to fail and action should be taken in China and Vietnam.

In Wuhan, where the virus originated, authorities went door-to-door to monitor people and made sure people with Covid were self-isolating.

In Vietnam, infected people and people entering the country had to be quarantined for two weeks.

Although around 90 percent of the UK population abides by regulations, the roads and public transport remain busy this week, allowing the virus to spread.

As a result, ministers are considering introducing stricter measures as part of the move, including possibly requiring face masks in busy outdoor areas.

Prof. Costello told Der Spiegel: “We are in a national crisis with a pandemic that is out of control. We shouldn't open kindergartens, synagogues, churches, or mosques. We should have mandatory masks, two meters apart.

“We have to take this really seriously – the Asian countries have done that. The longer we let it go on, the sooner we'll get a virus resistant to a vaccine, then we're in real doo-doo. & # 39;

Prof. Pagel added: “We need to think about compulsory isolation, like in China and Vietnam. We have a lot of empty hotels. We could use this space. & # 39;

However, Mr Hancock also warned that it is "very likely" that people will be vaccinated against Covid annually, as with the flu.

He told Sky News: "I think it is very likely that there will be a double vaccination program against flu and Covid for the foreseeable future, in the medium term."

He added: “The flu vaccination rates are at their highest ever. Over 80 percent of those over 65 were vaccinated against the flu this year. That is the biggest increase, a jump over the previous year, when it was around 70 percent.

& # 39; That is very good news. This is good news for two reasons. First, to protect people from the flu, and second, because it shows that the vast majority of people over 65 are ready to get vaccinated. & # 39;

The warning came when Professor Sridhar, Chair of Public Health at Edinburgh University, described the three approved vaccinations as "bright spots".

But she also warned Times Radio that it is not yet clear how long immunity will last, whether the vaccines will prevent people from becoming infectious, or how much of the population would need to be covered to ensure herd immunity.

She said, “If you really want to get real herd immunity, you'll see 80-90% of the population, which would take you next fall yourself with our current introduction.

"We have to make sure at this point that the people who are vaccinated still have immunity."

She added: “For me the vaccine is definitely there, we need to keep rolling out and keep saving lives by protecting vulnerable people.

“But it's not a strategy in itself, and it's very, very risky to rely on it alone, especially with all the new variants and mutations.

"We need a plan and the vaccine supports that plan, but it's just your plan."

In yet another blow to hopes the vaccine will bring British life back to normal, other experts warned that social distancing measures may have to stay in place year round.

Professor Peter Horby, chair of the UK Government's Advisory Group on New and Emerging Respiratory Virus Threats, said even after vaccinating the most vulnerable sections of the population, things would not necessarily go back to normal.

He told the BBC's Andrew Marr Show, “I don't think it's going to make us normal again.

“There will still be large numbers of people infected, and while the absolute risk of someone under the age of 80 dying or hospitalized is small, there are large numbers of infections that still affect many People Transmitting We need to fight the virus with social distancing measures and vaccinations for the months to come. & # 39;

On the likelihood of social distancing measures being taken next winter, he said, “I think that's likely. I think it depends a lot on how well we can expand the vaccination program and how quickly we can make it available to a significant segment of the population. & # 39;

Professor Horby also reiterated Mr. Hancock's comments that people would need to be given a coronavirus vaccine "every few years" if it needed to be updated against new variants, adding that the virus "will not go away".

He said, & # 39; This (virus) is not going to go away in my opinion. We'll have to live with it, but that can change a lot.

“It can become an endemic virus, it is with us all the time, and it can cause seasonal pressures and some excessive deaths, but it doesn't cause the major disruption that we see now

However, he said the data on the vaccine's effectiveness against new variants of the disease were "encouraging."

It comes from the fact that mass vaccination centers across the country are slated to open next week in a bid to significantly boost vaccine adoption in the UK.

The mass vaccination centers in Newcastle, Manchester, London, Stevenage, Surrey, Bristol and Birmingham can treat up to four people per minute and will work with primary care practices and other institutions to meet the prime minister’s ambitious goal.

The hubs will be located in sports facilities, conference centers and a science park.

Invitations to receive the vaccine are now being sent out to people over the age of 80. Previous invitations were for people over 90 and key workers.

Empty chairs have been placed a meter apart in the waiting area of ​​Bristol's huge stadium, which is usually home to Bristol City FC. and the Bristol Bears

Empty chairs have been placed a meter apart in the waiting area of ​​Bristol's huge stadium, which is usually home to Bristol City FC. and the Bristol Bears

Photos of the Ashton Gate Stadium show desks hidden behind partitions so that the vaccinated people have some privacy from those waiting for the push

Photos of the Ashton Gate Stadium show desks hidden behind partitions so that the vaccinated people have some privacy from those waiting for the push

Vaccination booths at Ashton Gate Stadium in Bristol. It comes after Prime Minister Boris Johnson admitted earlier this week that the vaccination schedule needs to be sped up, as figures suggest that only one in ten nursing home residents and 14 percent of staff have been vaccinated to date

Vaccination booths at Ashton Gate Stadium in Bristol. It comes after Prime Minister Boris Johnson admitted earlier this week that the vaccination schedule needs to be sped up, as figures suggest that only one in ten nursing home residents and 14 percent of staff have been vaccinated to date

Above are the locations of the seven mass vaccination centers that will start operating next week

Above are the locations of the seven mass vaccination centers that will start operating next week

The Queen and Duke of Edinburgh receive a Covid vaccine: the 94-year-old monarch and 99-year-old Prince Philip are vaccinated at Windsor Castle

The Queen and Duke of Edinburgh received the Covid-19 vaccination at Windsor Castle, Buckingham Palace yesterday.

The news of the vaccination of the Queen and Duke of Edinburgh is unusual at Buckingham Palace, who rarely comment on the royal couple's private health issues

The news of the vaccination of the Queen and Duke of Edinburgh is unusual at Buckingham Palace, who rarely comment on the royal couple's private health issues

The 94-year-old monarch and 99-year-old Prince Philip have joined more than 1.5 million people across the UK who have received the sting since the Pfizer / BioNTech vaccine was approved for use in December.

The UK has since approved the use of the Oxford University / AstraZeneca sting along with a vaccine against the coronavirus developed by Moderna.

The news of the vaccination of the Queen and Duke of Edinburgh is unusual at Buckingham Palace, who rarely comment on the royal couple's private health issues.

It is understood that the Queen decided to make the information public to avoid inaccuracies and further speculation.

A Buckingham Palace spokesman said: "The Queen and Duke of Edinburgh received Covid-19 vaccinations today."

When asked by MailOnline, the palace refused to indicate which of the two available vaccines the couple had received.

It was revealed yesterday that The Queen, 94) and Prince Philip, 99, were among the 1.5 million people across the UK to have been given the sting since the Pfizer / BioNTech vaccine was approved for use in December.

The UK has since approved the use of the Oxford University / AstraZeneca sting along with a vaccine against the coronavirus developed by Moderna.

The news of the vaccination of the Queen and Duke of Edinburgh is unusual at Buckingham Palace, who rarely comment on the royal couple's private health issues.

It is understood that the Queen decided to make the information public to avoid inaccuracies and further speculation.

The UK is hoping to have around 13 million people vaccinated against Covid-19 by mid-February, with a focus on the elderly, health and care workers and people with serious illnesses.

If this is achieved, the current national lockdown – the toughest since March 2020 – can be eased.

However, experts have warned that they will need to speed up the roll-out to meet the ambitious goal.

Politicians have tried to shift the blame for disruptions to initial vaccine supplies from Oxford and Pfizer, with Boris Johnson first blaming quality checks by the MHRA and Matt Hancock and later trying to blame difficulties on limited manufacturing capacity.

The Minister of Health said in Parliament: "The determining factor is the amount of juice actually available, the actual vaccine, which is not made like a chemical but effectively … a biological product." He described the vaccine manufacturing process as "complicated and difficult".

And Britain felt envious when Europe approved the Moderna vaccine and will begin shipping the 95 percent effective vaccine from next week, while the British have to wait until March because officials have not pre-ordered it.

It comes, as an expert warned today, that Britain must now go into an Asian-style lockdown, where kindergartens and places of worship are closed and hotels are used as isolation centers and masks in every public space.

Former WHO director Anthony Costello said only "a total clampdown" would stop the mutant strain of coronavirus that is pervading the country.

UCL Operations Research Professor Christina Pagel added that she believes current lockdown restrictions are likely to fail and action should be taken in China and Vietnam.

In Wuhan, where the virus originated, authorities went door-to-door to monitor people and made sure people with Covid were self-isolating.

In Vietnam, infected people and people entering the country had to be quarantined for two weeks.

Although around 90 percent of the UK population abides by regulations, the roads and public transport remain busy this week, allowing the virus to spread.

As a result, ministers are considering introducing stricter measures as part of the move, including possibly requiring face masks in busy outdoor areas.

Former WHO director Anthony Costello said only "a total clampdown" would stop the mutant strain of coronavirus that is pervading the country

UCL Operations Research Professor Christina Pagel added that she believes current lockdown restrictions are likely to fail and action should be taken in China and Vietnam.

Former WHO director Anthony Costello (left) said only a "total clampdown" would stop the mutant strain of coronavirus that is pervading the country. UCL operational research professor Christina Pagel (right) added that she believes current lockdown restrictions are likely to fail and action should be taken in China and Vietnam.

In Wuhan, where the virus originated, authorities went door-to-door to monitor people and made sure people with Covid self-isolated (picture China last February).

In Wuhan, where the virus originated, authorities went door-to-door to monitor people and made sure people with Covid self-isolated (picture China last February).

Three police officers in face masks interview a man who is sitting on a bench in St. James & # 39; s Park in central London this morning

Three police officers in face masks interview a man who is sitting on a bench in St. James & # 39; s Park in central London this morning

Although around 90 percent of the population “mostly” adhere to regulations, roads and public transport are still busy this week, allowing the virus to spread. Pictured: Clapham today

Although around 90 percent of the population “mostly” adhere to regulations, roads and public transport are still busy this week, allowing the virus to spread. Pictured: Clapham today

Prof. Costello told Der Spiegel: “We are in a national crisis with a pandemic that is out of control. We shouldn't open kindergartens, synagogues, churches, or mosques. We should have mandatory masks, two meters apart.

“We have to take this really seriously – the Asian countries have done that. The longer we let it go on, the sooner we'll get a virus resistant to a vaccine, then we're in real doo-doo. & # 39;

Prof. Pagel added: “We need to think about compulsory isolation, like in China and Vietnam. We have a lot of empty hotels. We could use this space. & # 39;

Professor Kevin Fenton, Regional Director of Public Health England in London, said yesterday that the more coronavirus patients the NHS has to treat, the harder it is to keep other services open.

No more warnings: the police promise to get even tougher with fines

Police promise to toughen up fines for the lockdown as scientists call for even stricter restrictions, while No10 pushes an intimidating new ad campaign to try to arrest the rising number of coronavirus cases across the country.

Derbyshire Police were criticized yesterday for going too far against the lockdown after officers attacked two friends for driving only seven miles to walk at a beauty spot.

As a result, the "intimidating" force is reviewing its Covid operations after gaining clarity on the rules. West Mercia police also ridiculed for threatening to fined £ 200 for playing in the snow.

Still, the message from government sources today is that the police should focus more on enforcing than explaining rules, now, almost 10 months after the first restrictions came into effect.

This was confirmed by the Wiltshire Police Chief Kier Pritchard, who wrote in the Gazette and Herald: “While we will continue to monitor the police with consent and in an appropriate manner, my officers will move on to enforcement much more quickly when confronted with people that clearly violate the rules.

So far, the police force has focused on engagement, stepping up messaging in our communities and encouraging the public to abide by it first and foremost and only reverted to enforcement when we are subjected to deliberate or repeated violations.

"We will continue to work with our communities, but my officials will quickly move on to enforce those who openly break the rules."

He told BBC Breakfast, “I would encourage people to read and watch the programs that you run on television, where you interview doctors, where you interview patients who have had this very serious illness and have long-term effects from it

& # 39; This is the reality and this is the truth. So the advice would be to listen, read, but stay home. Protect yourself, protect your families. & # 39;

The concerns have sparked suggestions from other experts that current levels of restrictions are not robust enough to combat the continued surge in certain cases.

Susan Michie, a professor of health psychology at University College London who advises the SAGE Committee of Experts, told BBC Radio Four's Today program, “This is a pretty lax ban as we still have a lot of household contact and people keep going in and out of other people's homes if they are a cleaning lady, non-essential trading person, or nanny.

“We also have mass gatherings related to religious events and open kindergartens, and you have this broad definition of critical workers, so we currently have 30-50% of the classes full and use public transport to get to and from these things a lot.

& # 39; It's definitely too loose. If you compare yourself to March, it's the winter season and the virus is surviving in the cold longer. Plus, people spend more time indoors. We now know that indoor aerosol transmission is a very large source of transmission for this virus.

Second, we have this new variant that is 50-70% more contagious. If you put those two things together with the NHS in crisis, we should have a more stringent lockdown, no less stringent than we were in March. & # 39;

Professor Michie's concerns were raised by Dr. Adam Kucharski, an epidemiologist at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, confirmed who said the new variant should be treated as a "new pandemic within a pandemic".

The Sage member said today: “The first signs we are seeing indicate that the population is likely to be less moving than in November, but maybe a little more than in April, and that is obviously worrying because of this new variant Essentially, every interaction we have has become riskier than it was before.

& # 39; Even if we went back to last spring's exposure reduction, we couldn't be sure that we would see the same impact as last year due to the increased transmission.

“To some extent, we can think of this as a new pandemic within a pandemic.

& # 39; From the data published, it appears that this is a very serious threat. New data from PHE (Public Health England) released yesterday suggests the per-contact risk is likely 40-50% higher than it was.

& # 39; For both the UK and many other countries we need to get rid of this idea that we are going to see a repeat of what happened to our behavior last spring and really face the possibility that it is much riskier is and We are going to have to work a lot harder to reduce the impact. & # 39;

MailOnline has contacted Oxford Vaccine Group, Pfizer, Moderna and the Department of Health to find out how long Covid vaccines provide protection.

A recent post on the website of the American Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said experts would not know how long they would be protected from vaccines until more data became available.

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