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Manhattan's greatest CEOs ask de Blasio to address quality of life issues in NYC.


Top CEOs urge Bill de Blasio to fix New York: The heads of 160 large corporations, including Macy's, Goldman Sachs and Lyft, are calling on the mayor to fight crime and improve the quality of life to keep them in droves to return fled residents

  • Directors of Lyft, Macy's, Goldman Sachs, and others signed the letter to de Blasio asking him to fix quality of life issues in NYC
  • They said New Yorkers had "widespread public safety concerns" and the problems had contributed to "worsening conditions" in the city
  • De Blasio took to Twitter and said he was grateful to the business community for helping rebuild a fairer, better city.

CEOs of 160 top corporations have urged New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio to address public safety and quality of life issues that have deteriorated the city.

Directors of Lyft, Macy's, Goldman Sachs, and others signed the letter to de Blasio, saying they were certain the city would "remain a thriving global hub for trade, innovation and opportunity."

Although New York has had an infection rate of less than one percent for more than 30 days, according to CEOs, there have been widespread concerns about public safety, cleanliness, and other quality of life issues that are worsening business and neighborhoods the five countries contribute districts. & # 39;

David M. Solomon, Chairman and CEO, Goldman Sachs

Directors of Lyft, Macy's, Goldman Sachs, and others signed the letter to de Blasio asking him to fix quality of life issues in NYC

The CEOs urged de Blasio to take "immediate action to restore essential services" to tackle the complex economic challenges that the city is sure to face following the pandemic

The CEOs called on de Blasio to take "immediate action to restore essential services" to address the complex economic challenges that the city is sure to face in the wake of the pandemic

In the letter, de Blasio and Governor Andrew Cuomo were asked to send a "consistent message" about when people in the city could expect to return to "safe and healthy work environments".

Otherwise, concerns would continue to be raised. "Concerns about the safety and viability of our communities are being addressed quickly and with respect and fairness for the various populations of our city," said the CEOs.

The CEOs urged de Blasio to take "immediate action to restore essential services" to tackle the complex economic challenges that the city is sure to face following the pandemic.

"We look forward to your answer and to working with you and others who work together for a lively recreation and a great future for our city," said the CEOs in their letter.

Logan Green, Co-Founder and CEO of Lyft

Catherine Engelbert, Commissioner, WNBA

The CEOs called on de Blasio to take "immediate action to restore essential services" to address the complex economic challenges that the city is sure to face in the wake of the pandemic

De Blasio took to Twitter and said he was grateful to the business community for helping rebuild a fairer, better city.

De Blasio took to Twitter and said he was grateful to the business community for helping rebuild a fairer, better city.

De Blasio took to Twitter and said he was grateful to the business community for helping rebuild a fairer, better city.

"Let's be clear: in order to restore city services and save jobs, we need long-term credit and a federal incentive. We need these leaders who will join the fight to move the city forward," he said.

The letter comes because less than 10 percent of New York office workers have returned to public workplaces, which threatens the city's financial health as office buildings account for nearly 10 percent of total annual revenue.

Optimists hoped the city's 1 million office workers would return to skyscrapers as the pandemic progressed, but reports show that it simply isn't.

The Return to Office Survey published by Partnership for New York City found that only eight percent of employees returned to the office in mid-August.

Employers have lowered their expectations by 33 percent since May. Only 26 percent of the employees surveyed are expected to return by the end of the year.

That number jumps by a little more than half for a return flight date in July 2021 – or 54 percent.

Crime in the Big Apple has also increased, according to the New York Daily News. Shootings were up 89.6 percent from January 1 through September last year.

In addition, the sanitation and parks departments have reduced garbage collection and homelessness has increased as tramps are housed in the city's hotels.

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