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Manchester Mayor Andy Burnham says Covid restrictions are triggering new infections


Andy Burnham said the coronavirus restrictions are working in Greater Manchester, lowering case numbers, fearing a second national lockdown if the UK sees spikes in cases similar to Spain.

The Mayor of Greater Manchester told the BBC that the numbers were gradually moving in the right direction and hoped that more districts could be exempt from restrictions soon.

Lockdowns were imposed across the northwest after the number of new infections rose. Mr Burnham said Saturday that the restrictions were already in effect and were put in place for good reason.

Mr Burnham's comments come after a senior official warned the UK could apply a second national lockdown if it spikes in cases like Spain.

Figures released on Friday show that there were 71.7 new cases per 100,000 people in Oldham, Greater Manchester in the seven days leading up to August 18, compared with 112.2 in the past seven days.

Pendle, which ranks second behind Oldham, has a rate of 67.3 versus 108.6.

Andy Burnham (above) said the strict lockdown restrictions in Greater Manchester are causing the infection numbers to gradually move in the right direction as he hopes the counties may be exempted soon

Figures released on Friday show that Oldham had 71.7 new cases per 100,000 people in the seven days leading up to August 18, compared to 112.2 in the past seven days. Pictured Oldham Shops on August 20th

Figures released on Friday show that Oldham had 71.7 new cases per 100,000 people in the seven days leading up to August 18, compared to 112.2 in the past seven days. Pictured Oldham Shops on August 20th

On Saturday's BBC News, Mr Burnham said, “I think we are starting to move the numbers in the right direction and that includes Oldham, which has had a noticeable drop in cases this week, and we have started seen falls in other districts of Greater Manchester as well.

“We put the restrictions in place about three weeks ago, and I'd say we've started to see these restrictions work now. So if we keep our fingers crossed, we can see that soon more districts will be exempted from these measures.

"But by and large we think it's right to put these restrictions in place and hopefully now people can see that they were put in place for a good reason."

Ministers said Wigan, Darwen and Rossendale had seen cases drop and would soon be exempted from the lockdown rules currently in place in Greater Manchester as well as parts of Lancashire and West Yorkshire.

However, households in Oldham, Pendle and Blackburn were banned from socializing from midnight on Saturday after the government announced drastic new measures to combat the coronavirus outbreak at the three agencies.

On Friday, the Ministry of Health and Social Affairs (DHSC) did not notify residents get in touch with someone outside of your household from Saturday.

Number 10 agreed to the stricter restrictions with the council chairmen, warning that infection rates are still rising despite "dedicated efforts" to contain the virus. Officials paused to refrain from full local bans and order the closure of businesses, warning local leaders that it would have been "catastrophic" for businesses already struggling.

The new rules do not prevent people from shopping, going to work or attending childcare facilities including schools that are slated to reopen from September 1st.

Indoor and outdoor social activities can only be shared with people who live together.

It is recommended that the number of people who can attend weddings and funerals be limited to members of the household and close relatives and no more than 20 people. Local restaurants are instructed not to allow walk-ins and only seat people who have reserved in advance – with a maximum of six people per table.

Households in Oldham, Pendle and Blackburn will be banned from socializing as of Saturday after the government announced drastic new measures to combat the coronavirus outbreak in the three agencies

Households in Oldham, Pendle and Blackburn will be banned from socializing as of Saturday after the government announced drastic new measures to combat the coronavirus outbreak in the three agencies

A sandwich factory in Northampton that supplies M&S - where nearly 300 employees tested positive for the coronavirus - closed on Friday and all employees and their households will be placed in isolation for two weeks or fined

A sandwich factory in Northampton that supplies M&S – where nearly 300 employees tested positive for the coronavirus – closed on Friday and all employees and their households will be placed in isolation for two weeks or fined

It was also announced that Birmingham would be placed on a watchlist as an "area of ​​enhanced assistance" and Northampton would be placed as an "area of ​​intervention".

The government said an increase in people who tested positive for coronavirus in Oldham, Blackburn and Pendle was due to "social intermingling", particularly among 20 to 39 year olds.

Leaders in the Northwest have also lifted strict coronavirus restrictions, claiming they were imposed without "detailed guidance" and created confusion.

Pendle Council union leader Mohammed Iqbal previously told the BBC's Today program that the restrictions the council argued against were "imposed" to "punish people who have tested at full speed".

He added: “The government has announced these tightening restrictions for the local population in my region, but has not issued detailed guidelines on how it will work and monitor it.

"So the local people are more confused than they were on Thursday evening."

Greater Manchester Police used social media on Saturday to instruct people not to call 999 or 101 for information about Covid-19 measures.

The force has been criticized for abandoning a children's birthday party, but Mr Burnham said the police were in a "no win" situation as they needed to enforce restrictions.

He said: “It is difficult, the police are criticized in both directions.

& # 39; The rules are the rules. I know how frustrating it is for people, but when they (the police) say they turn a blind eye over there, people will say why there and not here? & # 39;

The stricter restrictions were announced by the DHSC when vacationers came home to take new quarantine measures.

Travelers coming to the UK from Croatia from 4am on Saturday will have to self-isolate for 14 days. A surge in new coronavirus cases led the government to remove the country from their safe travel list.

The Government's Scientific Advisory Group on Emergencies (SAGE) estimates that the R-value - the average number of people each coronavirus patient will infect - is now between 0.9 and 1.1, compared to last week's forecast, that it was between 0.8 and 1.0

The Government's Scientific Advisory Group on Emergencies (SAGE) estimates that the R-value – the average number of people each coronavirus patient will infect – is now between 0.9 and 1.1, compared to last week's forecast, that it was between 0.8 and 1.0

A sandwich factory in Northampton that supplies M&S – where nearly 300 employees tested positive for the coronavirus – also closed on Friday. All employees and their households must isolate themselves for two weeks or face a fine.

The Department of Health said Health Secretary Matt Hancock would put regulations in place "to ensure this period of self-isolation is legally enforced," warning that anyone who fails to abide by the rules without a proper apology could be fined.

The government said 41,423 people died in the UK within 28 days of testing positive for Covid-19 on Saturday, up from 18 the day before.

What are the new rules in Oldham, Pendle and Blackburn?

As of Saturday, residents of Oldham, Pendle and Blackburn will no longer be allowed to have contact with anyone outside their household, either inside or outside.

Ministers also advise against using public transport unless it is essential travel.

The number of people who can attend weddings, civil partnerships and funerals is limited to members of the household and close relatives and no more than 20 people.

Local restaurants are encouraged not to allow walk-ins and only seat people who have made a reservation.

People are still allowed to shop, go to work and attend childcare.

Separate figures released by the UK statistical authorities show that the UK has now registered 57,000 deaths with Covid-19 mentioned on the death certificate.

The government also said there had been another 1,288 laboratory-confirmed cases of coronavirus at 9 a.m. on Saturday. A total of 324,601 cases were confirmed.

The news in the northwest comes after a senior official warned the UK could face a second national lockdown if it spikes in cases like Spain.

Further "nationwide measures" could be put in place to combat rising infections after the R-rate rose to over one for the first time since restrictions were lifted in July.

Senior officials said local outbreaks could skew the reproductive number, which must stay below one to avoid a renewed spike in infections, but another nationwide lockdown may soon be necessary to contain the spread.

Local bans in Manchester and Leicester have already been put in place, and households in Oldham and Blackburn will be banned from meeting in each other's homes starting Saturday.

Prime Minister Boris Johnson said in an interview with The Daily Telegraph last month that another lockdown would be a "nuclear deterrent" – effectively excluding the possibility of a second nationwide shutdown.

However, officials reportedly want to avoid a situation like Spain, where 142 cases per 100,000 people represent the fastest growing infection rate in Europe.

A senior government source told The Daily Telegraph, “If it isn't contained, it may be that some things were open. You need to think about whether action needs to be taken to turn things around.

"The strategy is to deal with this through local outbreak management. However, when it moves towards Spain you can clearly see what is happening there and in France people are taking more nationwide action."

They added that the prospect of a national lockdown depends on the "trajectory" of the spread and how quickly outbreaks can be dealt with.

Another source told the newspaper, "We are seeing pretty bumpy fall and winter and that will go in the direction of more cases and more outbreaks." The daily case count in the UK is almost double the number of cases in early June and is set to continue to rise once schools reopen in September.

In other coronavirus developments in the UK:

  • SAGE warned that the UK's coronavirus R rate could surpass the dreaded 1 level just hours after a government surveillance study.
  • The British made efforts to return from Croatia before new quarantine restrictions were introduced after a surge in infections.
  • The British rushed to book a holiday vacation in Portugal after it was on the "green list" and hotels cut prices at the last minute to fill rooms – but airfare has increased sixfold.
  • Official statistics have shown that the coronavirus has become the eighth most common killer in England. In another sign, the darkest days of the crisis are behind us.
  • Public sector debt surged to over £ 2 trillion for the first time in history after the government was forced to borrow billions of pounds to keep UK crippled industry alive during the coronavirus crisis.
  • Pregnant women and young mothers died needlessly in prison after being denied intensive care beds or mental health services, a damned Oxford University report warned.

Figueretes Beach on August 17, 2020 in Ibiza, Spain. Almost all Schengen countries recommend not to travel to Spain due to COVID -19

Figueretes Beach on August 17, 2020 in Ibiza, Spain. Almost all Schengen countries recommend not to travel to Spain due to COVID -19

Professor Sir Mark Walport, member of the Government's Scientific Advisory Group on Emergencies (Sage), was asked on BBC Radio 4's Today program if the UK would ever see another widespread lockdown.

He said, “Never is a very strong word. The whole point is to improve local control, increase the number of tests, and provide instructions to avoid this.

“But is there a situation where it could get out of hand? That is of course possible. & # 39;

Oliver Johnson, Professor of Information Theory at the University of Bristol, said, "The main concern is that R-values ​​of this magnitude do not leave a significant margin before the epidemic re-grows, increasing the possibility of some recurring -the openings may need to be rolled back to allow schools to open safely. & # 39;

The UK has around 11 cases per 100,000 people and only 97 have been hospitalized. However, Public Health England surveillance found that the detection of cases in England rose 11 percent from 5,763 to 6,418 in the week ended August 16.

There was confusion over the current course of the Covid-19 crisis in the UK. SAGE has warned that the UK coronavirus R-rate could surpass the dreaded 1 level just hours after a government surveillance study.

Government advisors estimate that the R-value – the average number of people each coronavirus patient will infect – is now between 0.9 and 1.1, compared to last week's prediction that it hovered between 0.8 and 1 . It has to stay below one, otherwise the virus could start to spread exponentially again.

However, an official report released this afternoon indicated that the epidemic was subsiding. The Office for National Statistics (ONS) estimates that weekly infections have decreased by a third in a week. In England alone, 2,400 people are diagnosed with the disease every day – up from 3,800 in the previous week.

Fears of a second wave are high as cases rose steadily in July – but government figures suggest they have declined again this week. Top experts warned that the increase was due to more testing in badly affected areas, saying hospital admissions and deaths had increased inconsistent with infections.

Government sources say the increase in cases is largely due to younger people becoming infected. Studies have shown that the risk of dying or getting seriously ill from Covid-19 is lower.

The National Statistics Office estimates 2,400 people develop the disease every day, a 37 percent decrease from 3,800 the previous week

The National Statistics Office estimates 2,400 people develop the disease every day, a 37 percent decrease from 3,800 the previous week

Health Secretary Matt Hancock said: "To prevent a second peak and keep Covid-19 under control, we need robust, targeted intervention that we see spikes in certain cases. The only way to stay up to date on this deadly virus is through decisive action by the people who know their areas best, wherever possible through consensus with a local area.

& # 39; In cooperation with local executives, we have agreed further measures (in) Oldham, Pendle and Blackburn. It is important that everyone in these areas follows the advice of their councils and carefully follows local regulations.

Sage fears Britain's rate could now be as high as 1.1

Confusion over the current course of the UK's Covid-19 crisis was sparked when SAGE warned the reproductive rate could now be 1.1, but a separate government study found cases had fallen again.

The Government's Scientific Advisory Group on Emergencies (SAGE) estimates that the R-value – the average number of people each coronavirus patient will infect – is now between 0.9 and 1.1, compared to last week's forecast, that it was between 0.8 and 1.0.

Experts say the R has to stay under one or governments risk losing control of the epidemic and the virus could spread exponentially again. SAGE said it had lost confidence that the R stayed below the danger zone.

SAGE said there are signs that the coronavirus is resurfacing in all home countries, which has fueled fears that a second wave of the virus is making its way through the country. Over the past week, the R-value in England rose from 0.8 to 1.0 to 0.9 to 1.0, which has increased the overall rate across the UK. Miniature outbreaks in Scotland and Northern Ireland also contributed to the increase.

To estimate the R, scientists examine clinical data such as hospital admissions and deaths, as well as behavioral surveys and movement patterns of people. However, SAGE warned that the R will be more volatile when transmission is as low as it is now in the UK – around 1,000 people are diagnosed daily. This means it can be pushed up by local clusters of infection that have been observed in parts of the north west of England.

SAGE's warning comes the same day a report from the Office for National Statistics (ONS) indicated that the epidemic was shrinking, causing confusion about how the virus is currently behaving.

The ONS found that weekly infections decreased by a third within a week. 2,400 people now contract the disease every day – a decrease of 37 percent compared to 3,800 in the previous week.

Statisticians for the government-led agency said while cases had been on the rise since July – leading to fears of a second wave – the upward trend of the epidemic has now stopped.

The ONS bases its predictions on 135,808 swab tests performed over a seven-week period, of which 61 tested positive for Covid-19. Because of the small number of positive tests, estimates should be treated with caution.

& # 39; Our approach is to make the measures we have taken as targeted as possible and to achieve the greatest possible local consensus.

“To do this, we're introducing a new process to increase engagement among local leaders, both councilors and MPs, to take as targeted action as possible. This allows the local councils to focus their resources on the wards that need more targeted action to lower infection rates and gives the local population a stronger voice at the table. & # 39;

The decision to impose stricter restrictions at Oldham, Blackburn and Pendle came after it was found that Oldham cases had hit 103.1 per 100,000 people in the week ended August 13.

In Blackburn and Pendle the case numbers had reached 95.3 and 75.5 cases, respectively.

The sharp increase in cases is partly due to a sharp increase in tests run by local authorities.

The city currently has 30.2 cases per 100,000 and the percentage of people who test positive is up to 4.3 percent.

The new name means that Birmingham is now undergoing additional testing, more local contact tracing and targeted community engagement.

The rules prohibiting social gatherings in Lancashire, Greater Manchester, West Yorkshire and Leicester are now being repealed in Wigan, Rossendale and some parts of Blackburn with Darwen.

These areas will be brought into line with the rest of England as of Wednesday 26 August, but the measures will continue to apply elsewhere. Another review is scheduled for next week.

The government's new approach to drafting local bans calls for councils to work together in areas of “national intervention” to propose a plan for a specific area that in some cases is on the rise.

Local leaders are expected to reach consensus among councils and local MPs on areas where coronavirus is less prevalent and exempt from restrictions.

A final decision will then be made by the Joint Biosecurity Center gold meeting, chaired by Mr. Hancock and Chief Medical Officer, Professor Chris Whitty.

The government's decision to tighten Oldham, Blackburn and Pendle came after SAGE warned that the reproductive rate could now be 1.1.

Experts say the R has to stay under one or governments risk losing control of the epidemic and the virus could spread exponentially again. SAGE said it had lost confidence that the R stayed below the danger zone.

SAGE said there are signs that the coronavirus is resurfacing in all home countries, which has fueled fears that a second wave of the virus is making its way through the country.

Over the past week, the R-value in England rose from 0.8 to 1.0 to 0.9 to 1.0, which has increased the overall rate across the UK. Miniature outbreaks in Scotland and Northern Ireland also contributed to the increase.

Official figures show that the city of Birmingham's infection rate has more than doubled in the past 14 days. There are around 25 new cases of coronavirus for every 100,000 people - from just 11 in the first week of August

Official figures show that the city of Birmingham's infection rate has more than doubled in the past 14 days. There are around 25 new cases of coronavirus for every 100,000 people – from just 11 in the first week of August

The most recent growth rate for the whole of the UK is between -3 percent and +1 percent. A growth rate between -3 percent and +1 percent means that the number of new infections is between a decrease of 3 percent and a daily growth of 1 percent. The most likely value is in the middle of the range

The most recent growth rate for the whole of the UK is between -3 percent and +1 percent. A growth rate between -3 percent and +1 percent means that the number of new infections is between a decrease of 3 percent and a daily growth of 1 percent. The most likely value is in the middle of the range

Researchers from King's College London, who run the COVID Symptom Tracker app used by millions of Britons, say Merthyr Tydfil should now be closely monitored in Wales, Dundee City and Nottingham. The lock restrictions have already been reset for the other seven hotspots

Researchers from King's College London, who run the COVID Symptom Tracker app used by millions of Britons, say Merthyr Tydfil should now be closely monitored in Wales, Dundee City and Nottingham. The lock restrictions have already been reset for the other seven hotspots

IN CASES FRANCE SEES A DIFFERENT SPIKE – THAN BRITS WRITTEN TO COME HOME FROM CROATIA AND AUSTRIA

France saw another sharp rise in coronavirus cases on Thursday, with 4,700 infections – an increase of a thousand – while Italy saw its highest daily number since May.

There were also worrying spikes in Spain, Germany, Austria, Switzerland and Croatia – much of it was due to Europeans and young people partying during the summer heat wave.

Italy recorded 845 new cases on Thursday, the highest daily number since May, while France's 4,771 new infections saw a whopping increase from 3,776 on Wednesday (Figure: a 7-day moving average graph).

Italy recorded 845 new cases on Thursday, its highest level in three months, while France's 4,771 new infections saw a whopping increase from 3,776 on Wednesday.

The British struggled to return home from Croatia and Austria last night after Transport Minister Grant Shapps stated that anyone arriving from the countries must self-isolate for 14 days.

British Airways' economy flights from Zagreb to London cost £ 276, up from £ 82 on Monday. It is believed that there are around 20,000 British tourists in Croatia.

To estimate the R, scientists examine clinical data such as hospital admissions and deaths, as well as behavioral surveys and movement patterns of people.

However, SAGE warned that the R will be more volatile when transmission is as low as it is now in the UK – around 1,000 people are diagnosed daily.

This means it can be pushed up by local clusters of infection that have been observed in parts of the north west of England.

SAGE's warning comes the same day a report from the Office for National Statistics (ONS) indicated that the epidemic was shrinking, causing confusion about how the virus is currently behaving.

The ONS found that weekly infections decreased by a third within a week. 2,400 people now contract the disease every day – a decrease of 37 percent compared to 3,800 in the previous week.

Statisticians for the government-led agency said while cases had been on the rise since July – leading to fears of a second wave – the upward trend of the epidemic has now stopped.

The ONS bases its predictions on 135,808 swab tests performed over a seven-week period, of which 61 tested positive for Covid-19. Because of the small number of positive tests, estimates should be treated with caution.

One of the government's top science advisors said that after reviewing the R-Rate study and the ONS report, they felt that "this is all likely going up very gently".

They warned more younger people about testing positive, suggesting it was only a matter of time before they started infecting older citizens who are far more susceptible to the nasty symptoms of Covid-19.

The ONS's daily infection predictions are very different from the government's official daily count, which is published every afternoon by the Department of Health and Welfare (DHSC).

The test data is collected by the ONS from swab tests that are regularly sent out to people's homes to test if they are infected with the virus at the time. People are selected to be representative of the UK population.

The households taking part in the survey were tested for Covid-19, regardless of whether they had symptoms or not.

Thousands of people become infected but never request a test and are therefore not reported in the DHSC's statistics.

According to the official metric, 1,051 Brits test positive for the life-threatening disease on average every day – that's half what the ONS predicts.

For comparison, Thursday's moving average was 1,043 and had been down every day since Aug. 15 when the number hit a six-week high of 1,097.

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