ENTERTAINMENT

Manchester Mayor Andy Burnham is calling for a curfew on alcohol sales at 9pm


Manchester Mayor Andy Burnham is calling for the sale of alcohol in stores to be banned after 9 p.m. in order to end the after pub parties when the last orders come in at 10 p.m.

  • Andy Burnham urged the government to review the 10 p.m. curfew
  • The Mayor of Manchester also suggested stopping alcohol sales in shops at 9 p.m.
  • The government struck over an "idiotic" curfew that is crowding the streets with drinkers
  • Scientists say ministers should have foreseen that closing bars early would result in a crowd

Police, scientists and politicians joined forces yesterday to call on Boris Johnson to reconsider the controversial 10 p.m. curfew, claiming it does more harm than good.

Andy Burnham, the mayor of Greater Manchester, called for an urgent review of the rules he believed had resulted in people buying drinks under license and holding house parties.

On Friday, the pubs curfew after 11 p.m. contributed to a 55 percent drop in traffic on main streets, according to analysts at Springboard.

Mr Burnham's warning came after footage of crowds floating around the country's city centers on Saturday night.

Andy Burnham, the mayor of Greater Manchester, called for an urgent review of the rules he believed had resulted in people buying drinks under license and holding house parties

"I received reports that the supermarkets were crowded with people gathering," the mayor told Radio 4's Today program.

“I think there is an urgent need to review emerging evidence from police forces across the country.

“My gut feeling is that this curfew does more harm than good. It creates an incentive for people to gather in the street, or rather at home.

“This is the opposite of what our local restrictions are trying to do here. I don't think this has been fully thought out. “Mr Burnham suggested that one option could be to put an alcohol ban on alcohol sales in stores from 9pm to prevent licenses from being issued quickly after pubs close.

Scientists said ministers should have foreseen that the early closings of bars and restaurants would lead to crowds and increased public transport traffic.

It found that only 3 percent of the coronavirus outbreaks studied by Public Health England were due to people gathering in bars and restaurants.

It had been illegal for two households to mingle in the yard or garden, but it was only guidance that they should not meet in public places, including restaurants and pubs. Pictured: a group of girls take to the streets of Newcastle

It had been illegal for two households to mingle in the yard or garden, but it was only guidance that they should not meet in public places, including restaurants and pubs. Pictured: a group of girls take to the streets of Newcastle

Health Secretary Helen Whately said the government was open to the new regulations that went into effect in England last week.

National Police Federation chairman John Apter said police are struggling to disperse large crowds with limited numbers of officers available.

"You may only have one or two people on a busy main street at 10 p.m. when hundreds and hundreds of people are taking to the streets," he said today.

“My colleagues will do their best to encourage and force people to keep going, but it's really difficult. All you need is a hostile group to turn against these officials and the resources for this city center have been used up for that one incident. "

Professor Susan Michie, a member of the government's Scientific Advisory Group on Emergencies (Sage), said it was always "predictable" that throwing people onto the street at the same time would lead to the formation of crowds.

Professor Michie, a behaviorist at University College London, said it was "particularly worrying" that people are being squeezed together in public transport and that it was "of the utmost importance" that ministers listen to scientific advice.

"These effects of the curfew undermine the profits saved by shortening the latter part of the evening and can even be counterproductive," she said.

"The measure is another example of a constraint put in place without a coherent strategy and without adequate consultation of relevant experts and communities." Professor Robert Dingwall, a sociologist who also advises the government, said, "The contempt for the night economy is reflected in the puritan streak in public health that has marked so many interventions."

Ms. Whately said ministers wanted to learn from the experience but insisted that the government act in response to the rising infection rate last week.

"It is clearly early," she said today. "We're always learning and seeing what has the biggest impact, but we clearly need to take a step because we've seen rates rise across the country."

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