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Manchester explains "major event" Daily mail online


Coronavirus cases doubled last week in Manchester and are increasing when the city declared a "major incident" after closing 4.5 million people – but young people are still flocking to busy pubs.

Infection rates for the week through Thursday – when the new local blocking measures were introduced – show cases per 100,000 people that are still increasing in every part of Greater Manchester.

Oldham, the second worst affected neighborhood in England, saw its infection rate rise from 41.6 to 62.8 per 100,000 people within seven days. 148 new cases were reported last week.

Locals have now been banned from meeting people from different households in their homes or in gardens.

The ban also applies to pubs and restaurants – however, these shops may remain open to visitors or individuals from the same household.

However, pictures of large groups of friends gathering in busy nightclubs on Saturday suggest that many people ignore the rules altogether.

This graph shows the number of infections in Greater Manchester from July 1st to July 29th

The night owls in Manchester did not pursue social distancing measures on Saturday evening despite the increase in cases

The night owls in Manchester did not pursue social distancing measures on Saturday evening despite the increase in cases

Sir Richard Leese, Chairman of the Manchester City Council, urged residents to remain calm last night after officials decided to increase their readiness as they deal with the increasing coronavirus transmission rates in the region.

"People shouldn't be concerned that a serious incident has been reported," said Sir Richard.

The Labor politician called the move "standard practice for complex situations" and said it would allow a "central command structure" to be created so that agencies could "use additional resources".

Oldham has had the highest number of cases in Greater Manchester, with Trafford, Tameside, Rochdale and Stockport boroughs, and the cities of Manchester and Salford, which are also among the 20 most affected areas in England.

Pictures of party guests packing local nightclubs this weekend should be cause for concern as the number of cases increases.

Greater Manchester Mayor Andy Burnham wrote before the Sunday Mirror announcement that people in the region were "broadly" brilliant at complying with the new rules and declined "efforts, some for the injury." responsible for blocking rules ".

The comments follow a statement by Tory MP Craig Whittaker, whose seat in Calder Valley, West Yorkshire, was one of the areas affected by the new blocking measures that it was the BAME communities (black, Asian, and ethnic minorities) that were don't do that seriously enough & # 39 ;.

While the new regulations for Blackburn with Darwen and Bradford – the area with the highest Covid rate in England – were published on Friday, the regulations for Greater Manchester are not expected to be published until this week.

Mr. Burnham said the restrictions are reviewed weekly.

This graph shows infection rates in the North West - with parts of Greater Manchester among the highest case concentrations

This graph shows infection rates in the North West – with parts of Greater Manchester among the highest case concentrations

A group of friends in town hugging on Wilmslow Road in Manchester, which was packed on Saturday night

A group of friends in town hugging on Wilmslow Road in Manchester, which was packed on Saturday night

Former English midfielder Paul Scholes was accused of having a party at his home in Oldham to celebrate his son's 21st birthday on the same day that blocking measures were again taken in parts of the Northwest.

The Sun cited phone tapes showing night owls at Friday's seven-hour party ignored social distance while drinking and dancing. Tory MP Andrew Bridgen was quoted in the newspaper for criticizing Mr. Scholes for "ruthless behavior".

Greater Manchester police said they visited the property and encouraged those present to comply with the newly imposed restrictions.

In national developments, housing secretary Robert Jenrick questioned reports of so-called "nuclear" options that were being considered to avoid a second national ban.

The Times reported that the Prime Minister held a "war game" session with Chancellor Rishi Sunak on Wednesday to discuss possible options in the event of a second wave of infections. These measures are said to include lockdown-like conditions for London with the M25 as a barrier around the capital.

But Mr. Jenrick told Times Radio that the proposals under discussion, such as encouraging 50-year-olds to protect themselves from society, were "just speculation."

Meanwhile, Mr. Sunak's Eat Out To Help Out program started today, giving guests 50% off in a number of pubs and restaurants.

Socially distant worshipers in the Bradford Central Mosque on Friday - the first day of Eid

Socially distant worshipers in the Bradford Central Mosque on Friday – the first day of Eid

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