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Man charged with wanton endangerment for shooting police officers in Louisville – as did Breonna Taylor cop


Larynzo Johnson was arrested Wednesday evening after two police officers were shot dead while protesting the grand jury's decision

A suspected shooter was charged with "willful endangerment" after two Louisville police officers were shot dead while protesting the Kentucky Grand Jury's decision not to bring charges of murder against the officers involved in Breonna Taylor's death.

Larynzo Johnson, 26, was arrested Wednesday night for shooting police officers and charged with assaulting a first degree police officer and willful first degree harm. The latter is the same charge against the only police officer charged with Taylor's murder.

Only one officer, Brett Hankison, has been charged in connection with the botched robbery in which Taylor was shot and killed six times in March in her home.

He was handed only three cases of wanton endangerment – a far cry from the murder charges brought on by protesters and Taylor's family.

The first degree indictment, a Class D crime that carries a sentence of up to five years in prison, relates to Hankison shooting into the neighboring apartments during the incident.

No charges were brought against him regarding the death of Taylor, and the other two officers who fired 22 shots at the black paramedic's home were not charged.

Johnson was charged with two police officer attacks and 14 wanton threats after shooting police officers Wednesday night and punching one in the thigh and the other in the stomach under their bulletproof vest.

His detention quote said Johnson "deliberately used a pistol to fire multiple bullets at officers … resulting in serious bodily harm," the Courier Journal reported.

A total of 127 protesters were arrested last night during the riot in Taylor's home state of Louisville. Dozens more were taken into custody during demonstrations across America, including New York, Chicago and Los Angeles.

In Seattle, Washington state, 13 people were arrested after a police officer was hit over the head with a baseball bat for items including property destruction, resisting arrest, failure to disperse and attacking a police officer.

Meanwhile, shocking footage surfaced online of a Seattle police officer pushing a bike over the head of a protester who was lying on the ground.

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A protester stands next to a burning heap of rubbish as tensions boiled in downtown Louisville Wednesday night

A protester stands next to a burning heap of rubbish as tensions boiled in downtown Louisville Wednesday night

A burning trash can in Louisville amid a night of protests against the decision not to charge three police officers with the murder of Taylor's March death

A burning trash can in Louisville amid a night of protests against the decision not to charge three police officers with the murder of Taylor's March death

Protesters march through the streets of downtown Louisville indignant that no murder charges have been brought against police officers involved in Taylor's murder

Protesters march through the streets of downtown Louisville indignant that no murder charges have been brought against police officers involved in Taylor's murder

A line of riot gear stands together blocking the path of the protesters outraged by the grand jury's verdict

A line of riot gear stands together blocking the path of the protesters outraged by the grand jury's verdict

Two unidentified police officers were shot dead when gunfire rang out and a suspect was taken into custody Wednesday night

Two unidentified police officers were shot dead when gunfire rang out and a suspect was taken into custody Wednesday night

Heavily armed riot police guard a street in downtown Louisville amid protests sparked by a Kentucky grand jury decision to clear three officers of charges of Breonna Taylor's death

Heavily armed riot police guard a street in downtown Louisville amid protests sparked by a Kentucky grand jury decision to clear three officers of charges of Breonna Taylor's death

Protesters hurled bottles of water and swear words into a police building in downtown Louisville on Wednesday night

Protesters hurled bottles of water and swear words into a police building in downtown Louisville on Wednesday night

According to the LMPD, at least 46 people had been arrested in connection with protests by 11 p.m.

According to the LMPD, at least 46 people had been arrested in connection with protests by 11 p.m.

Officials are mobilizing to round up protesters who are breaking a curfew in downtown Louisville on Wednesday night

Officials are mobilizing to round up protesters who are breaking a curfew in downtown Louisville on Wednesday night

Police are investigating an area where two Louisville officers were shot dead Wednesday night

Police are investigating an area where two Louisville officers were shot dead Wednesday night

Protesters walk past a burning heap of rubbish as tensions boiled over in downtown Louisville Wednesday night

Protesters walk past a burning heap of rubbish as tensions boiled over in downtown Louisville Wednesday night

A crowd of policemen in protective clothing await orders as protests continued on Wednesday evening well after the curfew

A crowd of policemen in protective clothing await orders as protests continued on Wednesday evening well after the curfew

Shortly after the police were shot, officers were on the street, resulting in two officers injured

Shortly after the police were shot, officers were on the street, resulting in two officers injured

Policemen dressed in protective clothing form a wall as they walk down a street in downtown Louisville looking for curfews

Policemen dressed in protective clothing form a wall as they walk down a street in downtown Louisville looking for curfews

The map above shows the location where two officers were shot dead in Louisville on Wednesday night, compared to where protesters faced a line of police officers at around the same time

The map above shows the location where two officers were shot dead in Louisville on Wednesday night, compared to where protesters faced a line of police officers at around the same time

Key developments in the Taylor case and subsequent protests:

  • A grand jury sued Brett Hankison on three charges of willful first-degree endangerment for shooting into neighbors' homes the night he and two other officers stormed their home with a narcotic warrant
  • Immediately after the charges were announced, protests broke out as hundreds of people marched through Louisville and surrendered to the police
  • Two Louisville officers were shot trying to disperse the crowd before the 9:00 p.m. curfew
  • President Donald Trump tweeted prayers for the injured officials and said he had offered to provide additional assistance to Kentucky Gov Andy Beshear
  • At least 46 people were arrested for protesting before 11 p.m. – including a suspect in the shooting
  • Other protests broke out in New York, Chicago, Washington, DC, Philadelphia and Atlanta
  • Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron defended the grand jury's decision, hitting celebrities who accused him of botching his four month investigation into the Taylor case

Robert Schroeder, Louisville interim police chief, said the shooting of the two officers took place around 8:30 p.m. on Brook Street and Broadway as officers responded to a large crowd of protesters.

Both officers, who did not identify themselves, were rushed to the University of Louisville Hospital.

They were both in stable condition and one had an operation last night.

"I am very concerned about the safety of our officers," said Schröder at a press conference shortly after 10 p.m. on Wednesday.

“Obviously we had two cops shot tonight. This is very serious and a dangerous condition. I think the safety of our officers and the community we serve is paramount. & # 39;

President Donald Trump took to Twitter shortly afterwards and said he was praying for the injured officials.

"The federal government is behind you and ready to help," he tweeted. "Talked to (Governor Andy Beshear) and we're ready to work together immediately upon request!"

Filming took place just 30 minutes before the curfew came into effect in the city.

The bystander video showed a group of people walking down a street when gunfire broke out several hundred meters away, in which police cars were parked with flashing lights.

At least 14 shots were fired at the person holding the camera and ran away from the source.

A live stream from the LMPD also captured the first moments of filming before they were cut off.

Johnson was arrested at 8:40 p.m., according to his detention quote. The suspect showed "extreme indifference to the value of human life" and exposed the officers to the risk of death or serious injury.

Witnesses identified him as the man who was seen firing a gun at police and running from the scene, and he was armed at the time of his arrest, the quote says.

Authorities expect the ballistics to prove that the shots fired were from the pistol in his possession.

Johnson has no previous violent crime arrests or criminal convictions, the Journal reported.

He is being held at Louisville Metro Corrections and is due to be charged Friday morning.

Two of the 127 people arrested in the city last night were Daily Caller reporters charged with offenses related to the suspension of the curfew and illegal gathering after they did not break up on police orders.

The bystander video showed a group of people walking down a street when gunfire broke out several hundred meters away, in which police cars were parked with flashing lights

At least 14 shots were fired at the person holding the camera and ran away from the source

The bystander video showed a group of people walking down a street when gunfire broke out several hundred meters away, in which police cars were parked with flashing lights. At least 14 shots were fired at the person holding the camera and ran away from the source

The Louisville Subway Police Department confirmed a shooting in Brook Street and Broadway at around 8:30 p.m. Wednesday and said officers had been rushed to a nearby hospital

The Louisville Subway Police Department confirmed a shooting in Brook Street and Broadway at around 8:30 p.m. Wednesday and said officers had been rushed to a nearby hospital

Police escorted a man from the area after an officer was shot dead Wednesday evening

Police escorted a man from the area after an officer was shot dead Wednesday evening

A crowd marches through an underpass after the 9 p.m. Louisville curfew went into effect

A crowd marches through an underpass after the 9 p.m. Louisville curfew went into effect

Police officers pull past Louisville City Hall as a 9 p.m. curfew is imposed to disperse protesters

Police officers pull past Louisville City Hall as a 9 p.m. curfew is imposed to disperse protesters

The night gave way to more violence in the city than fires broke out in the streets

The night gave way to more violence in the city than fires broke out in the streets

A couple passes a bus stop with broken windows after protests raged through the area on Wednesday evening

A couple passes a bus stop with broken windows after protests raged through the area on Wednesday evening

On Wednesday night, police officers are standing at a checkpoint in downtown Louisville looking for curfews

On Wednesday night, police officers are standing at a checkpoint in downtown Louisville looking for curfews

Firefighters put out a fire after protesters roamed the area Wednesday night

Firefighters put out a fire after protesters roamed the area Wednesday night

Armed members of the National Guard are seen armed waiting in a vehicle after being deployed by the governor

Armed members of the National Guard are seen armed waiting in a vehicle after being deployed by the governor

Protesters walk away from the police with their hands raised near the scene where two officers were shot dead Wednesday evening

Protesters walk away from the police with their hands raised near the scene where two officers were shot dead Wednesday evening

A large law enforcement presence stayed at the location of the officer’s shooting for hours after a suspect was arrested

A large law enforcement presence stayed at the location of the officer’s shooting for hours after a suspect was arrested

A man removes a cooler of water after protesters set fire to the Louis D. Brandeis Justice Hall

A man removes a cooler of water after protesters set fire to the Louis D. Brandeis Justice Hall

A police officer is standing behind a vehicle in the city center when protests broke out following the announcement by the grand jury

A police officer stands behind a vehicle in the city center when protests broke out following the announcement by the grand jury

A fire burns near a food station set up to feed protesters during Wednesday night's demonstrations

A fire burns near a food station set up to feed protesters during Wednesday night's demonstrations

WHAT IS WANTON RISK?

What's the fee?

Willful endangerment charges are made when a person is found to have engaged in reckless behavior without caring for human life, thereby placing a person at risk of death or serious injury.

"A person is guilty of willful endangerment in the first degree if, under circumstances that show extreme indifference to the value of human life, he willfully commits behavior that represents a serious risk of death or serious bodily harm to another person," says it in state law.

What is the penalty?

Exposure to Wanton in Kentucky is a Class D crime.

It can result in a prison sentence of up to five years.

How are the charges related to the Breonna Taylor case?

The three cases of wanton harm were brought against Officer Brett Hankison after the bullets he fired at Taylor's apartment ended up in an adjacent apartment.

Crime scene photos show the walls of Taylor's apartment full of bullet holes.

Louisville was thrown into an uproar after a grand jury decided not to charge the officers. Instead, she issued her decision to charge only one of the officers involved in Taylor's murder, Brett Hankison, with wanton endangerment for shooting into the homes of the 26-year-old EMT's neighbors when they were executing a warrant on March 13.

Immediately after the announcement, hundreds of demonstrators marched through the streets. Tension quickly escalated as protesters faced lines of police officers who fired pepperballs and pushed them back with wooden sticks.

Hundreds of protesters also took to the streets of cities such as New York, Washington, DC, Philadelphia and Las Vegas after the decision.

Cell phone footage shows the moment a Seattle police officer pushes his bike over the head of a protester during demonstrations in the city.

The shocking video shows a wall of police officers riding and pushing bicycles or walking down the street.

A protester lies on the street when a police officer rolls his bicycle over his head.

Seattle police said they were aware of the video and referred the incident to the city's Office of Police Accountability for investigation.

The department also said "several officers" were injured during the night's events.

A police officer was hit over the head with a baseball bat, which cracked his helmet, police said.

Clashes between protesters and law enforcement agencies also erupted in other parts of America. Authorities released chemical agents on protesters in Atlanta after they tried to climb onto a SWAT vehicle.

In Buffalo, New York, a protester with non-life threatening injuries was rushed to hospital after a driver in a pickup truck accelerated onto a group of protesters outside City Hall who beat a person on a bicycle.

People chased down the vehicle as the driver fled the scene.

Protesters claimed the driver yelled at them earlier that night.

The grand jury's announcement on Wednesday marked the end of a four-month investigation into the death of Taylor, who was shot and killed over six months ago by officials who stormed into her home with a narcotic warrant.

The EMT's death sparked months of protests, policy changes, and a call for criminal charges against the three Louisville Metro Police Department officers who carried out the raid.

The grand jury decided to give Hankison three cases of willful first-degree harm. The Class D crime, punishable by up to five years in prison, relates to Hankinson shooting into neighboring apartments during the robbery, not Taylor's death.

Hankinson was fired from the Louisville Metro Police Department in June after officials said he violated guidelines by "willfully and blindly" firing his gun during the robbery.

Sgt Jonathan Mattingly and Detective Myles Cosgrove, who were also present at the time of the fatal operation, were not charged.

People were seen crying and crying in Jefferson Square Park, Louisville when the decision was made as police helicopters surveyed the scene from above.

Cell phone footage shows the moment a Seattle police officer pushes his bike over the head of a protester during demonstrations in the city

Cell phone footage shows the moment a Seattle police officer pushes his bike over the head of a protester during demonstrations in the city

The shocking video shows a wall of police officers riding and pushing bicycles or walking down the street while a protester lies on the street. The policeman then rolls his bicycle over the person's head

The shocking video shows a wall of police officers riding and pushing bicycles or walking down the street while a protester lies on the street. The policeman then rolls his bicycle over the person's head

Protesters march against police brutality in Los Angeles Wednesday night as outrage over the grand jury's decision spread across America

Protesters march against police brutality in Los Angeles Wednesday night as outrage over the grand jury's decision spread across America

People waved banners and raised their fists in disgust at the decision not to bring murder charges against the police

People waved banners and raised their fists in disgust at the decision not to raise charges against the police for murder

The Kentucky Grand Jury has decided to indict just one of the officers involved in Taylor's murder, Brett Hankison

The Kentucky Grand Jury has decided to indict only one of the officers involved in Taylor's murder, Brett Hankison

Hundreds of protesters marched through the streets in New York as night fell after Hankison was charged with willful endangerment of shooting into the homes of the 26-year-old EMT's neighbors while they were executing an arrest warrant on March 13

Hundreds of protesters marched through the streets in New York as night fell after Hankison was charged with willful endangerment of shooting into the homes of the 26-year-old EMT's neighbors while they were executing an arrest warrant on March 13

Protesters carry a banner reading "Protect Black Women" as they walk the streets of the Big Apple

Protesters carry a banner reading "Protect Black Women" as they walk the streets of the Big Apple

The Empire State Building lights up as protesters walk through New York following Wednesday's decision

The Empire State Building lights up as protesters walk through New York following Wednesday's decision

In Chicago, Illinois, a protester carries a plaque honoring the black EMT Taylor, who was killed by police officers in March

In Chicago, Illinois, a protester carries a plaque honoring the black EMT Taylor, who was killed by police officers in March

Protesters filled the streets during a march for Breonna Taylor in Chicago Wednesday night

Protesters filled the streets during a march for Breonna Taylor in Chicago Wednesday night

During a march through Chicago, protesters used their bicycles as barricades against police officers

During a march through Chicago, protesters used their bicycles as barricades against police officers

& # 39; That's it? & # 39; Some asked while others called to burn the city down. "We don't get a murder charge?" asked another.

Many were annoyed that Hankison, the only police officer charged with three cases of wanton harm to Taylor's neighbors, was only required to deposit a $ 15,000 bond.

"It tells people cops can kill you in the sanctity of your own home," Linda Sarsour, a Palestinian-American activist, told the New York Times of the decision.

"There's no justification for it," added Desaray Yarbrough, a Louisville resident who came out to watch the march pass.

"The lack of fees is preparing to overthrow the city."

Police clash with protesters marching the streets of Louisville after a grand jury decided not to charge three officers with the death of Breonna Taylor on Wednesday afternoon

Police clash with protesters marching the streets of Louisville after a grand jury decided not to charge three officers with the death of Breonna Taylor on Wednesday afternoon

Hundreds of people took to the streets on Wednesday afternoon to decipher the grand jury's decision

Hundreds of people took to the streets on Wednesday afternoon to decipher the grand jury's decision

A woman reacts in fear after a Kentucky grand jury decides on Breonna Taylor's death

A woman reacts in fear after a Kentucky grand jury decides on Breonna Taylor's death

Police officers with batons chase a protester during a march in downtown Louisville on Wednesday afternoon

Police officers with batons chase a protester during a march in downtown Louisville on Wednesday afternoon

Officials drag a man to the ground when they arrest him during a protest Wednesday afternoon in Louisville

The man was then marched away in handcuffs by several officers

Officers pull a protester to the ground before handcuffing him away

The police were arrested several hours before the curfew went into effect at 9 p.m.

The police were arrested several hours before the curfew went into effect at 9 p.m.

A police officer is detaining a protester in downtown Louisville as demonstrations began Wednesday afternoon

A police officer is detaining a protester in downtown Louisville as demonstrations began Wednesday afternoon

A protester offers a man water while he is being held on the ground by police officers in protective clothing

A protester offers a man water while he is being held on the ground by police officers in protective clothing

Two protesters were knocked to the ground by police during a march in downtown Louisville on Wednesday afternoon

Two protesters were knocked to the ground by police during a march in downtown Louisville on Wednesday afternoon

A woman screams as a police officer tries to steal a bicycle from her during a clash between police officers and protesters

A woman screams as a police officer tries to steal a bicycle from her during a clash between police officers and protesters

A police officer stands in an alley after a police officer was shot dead Wednesday night

A police officer is standing in an alley after a police officer was shot dead on Wednesday evening

Protesters quickly gathered to march despite the 72-hour curfew and large parts of the city being closed.

Members of far-right groups, including the Boogaloo Boys and the Proud Boys, were deemed fully armed on their way downtown to challenge the protesters in the afternoon, but appeared to have disbanded by dark.

At around 2:15 p.m., the Times reported that 250 protesters with two dozen police cruisers were out hunting.

The group first marched through the closed parts of the city while singing, "If we don't get it, shut it up."

The video showed a U-Haul van pulling to the edge of the barricaded area and unloading a supply of supplies, including shields and signs reading "Abolish Police" and "Abolish Now".

Previously, a group of 150 people had blocked an intersection between Broadway and 6th Street, right in front of a barricade that authorities had put up around city buildings to keep protesters away.

The police arrived quickly and protesters moved on, watched by more police cars.

Tensions were already mounting as police prevented the crowd from entering certain streets and guides tried to keep the group together.

At one point, protesters stopped to mock officials waiting in a vehicle.

The discharged Louisville detective Brett Hankison was charged on the night of March 13 of three willful threats in connection with the police raid

Louisville Police force declared a state of emergency before Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron announced whether he would blame officials implicated in Breonna Taylor's death (pictured)

Sacked Louisville detective Brett Hankison (left) was charged with three wanton threats in connection with the police raid that killed Breonna Taylor (right) on the night of March 13

By 3 p.m., the crowd had grown to several hundred when they stopped at an intersection with signs to the front to organize.

Many shouted to those watching from home to join in.

Tensions continued to mount as the companies targeted and multiple windows were broken.

Some protesters were seen knocking over tables and chairs outside a restaurant before meeting with a white civic group patrolling businesses to protect them.

Other videos showed protesters hurling insults and water bottles at police officers who bandaged guns to push back the crowd.

At around 4:30 p.m., the officers started telling protesters that they were participating in an illegal gathering and ordered them to disperse immediately.

"If you don't do this, we may dispense chemicals and you will be arrested," officials told residents over a loudspeaker.

Police officers were photographed aggressively arresting several demonstrators by throwing them to the ground and holding them down while they were handcuffed.

The situation escalated as the curfew drew near and the officers told people to go home.

Protesters set fire to piles of rubbish and Gov Beshear dispatched 500 National Guard members to enforce the 9pm curfew across the city.

The two police officers were shot at around 8:30 p.m. and shortly afterwards Gov Beshear tweeted a video of himself asking protesters to pack up for the night.

"Unfortunately, we saw at least a single U-turn that provided nonviolent expressions for the shooting of at least two law enforcement officers," Beshear said. “We know that the answer to violence is never violence, and we think of these two officers and their families tonight.

“So I ask everyone, please go home. Go home tonight There will be many times the opportunity to be heard in the days to come and so many people are listening right now. & # 39;

But the protesters ignored Beshear's request and stayed on the streets as the police intensified their efforts to correct them.

The Daily Caller reported that two of its correspondents were detained on a sidewalk along with dozens of others tied in cable ties.

According to the LMPD, at least 46 people had been arrested in connection with protests by 11 p.m.

Armed counter-demonstrators also came to Louisville and were seen harassing drivers

The armed counter-protesters were filmed as they approached cars

Armed counter-demonstrators also came to Louisville and were seen harassing drivers

Protesters hold up their hands as they face a line of police officers in protective clothing

Protesters hold up their hands as they face a line of police officers in protective clothing

Hundreds of people gathered in Jefferson Square Park to hear the grand jury's decision reacted with anger and frustration after learning that only one of the three officials involved in Taylor's death would bring charges

Hundreds of people gathered in Jefferson Square Park to hear the grand jury's decision reacted with anger and frustration after learning that only one of the three officials involved in Taylor's death would bring charges

Protesters labeled "Abolish the Police" keep their fists in the air during a march in Louisville Wednesday afternoon

Protesters labeled "Abolish the Police" keep their fists in the air during a march in Louisville Wednesday afternoon

A police officer watches as people react to the grand jury's decision on Breonna Taylor's death

A police officer watches as people react to the grand jury's decision on Breonna Taylor's death

People are arrested in Louisville after a demonstration over Breonna Taylor's death Wednesday afternoon

People are arrested in Louisville after a demonstration over Breonna Taylor's death Wednesday afternoon

People react to the grand jury's decision on Breonna Taylor's death as hundreds gather to protest

People react to the grand jury's decision on Breonna Taylor's death as hundreds gather to protest

Louisville began preparing for possible riot last week after Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron said the grand jury's decision would be published "soon".

City officials began erecting barricades around Jefferson Square Park, which was the center of 100 days of protest against Taylor's death, and boarded up police and federal buildings pending protests.

Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer declared a state of emergency Tuesday night and announced a 72-hour curfew for the city from 9 p.m., excluding those going to work or receiving medical treatment.

"I urge everyone to vote peaceful and lawful protest," said Fischer, a white Democrat, shortly before Cameron's announcement.

& # 39; This is obviously a really important time for our city. I want us to think about our children and grandchildren and do it right. & # 39;

After the announcement, Fischer asked for peace and said: "Let us turn to each other, not to each other."

Four-wheeled military vehicles enter the city ahead of a curfew on Wednesday at 9 p.m., which remains in place for 72 hours

Four-wheeled military vehicles enter the city ahead of a curfew on Wednesday at 9 p.m., which remains in place for 72 hours

The protesters screamed in anger as the grand jury's decision was announced and a grand march began

The protesters screamed in anger as the grand jury's decision was announced and a grand march began

Other protesters watched in shock and disbelief as only one policeman was charged

Other protesters watched in shock and disbelief as only one policeman was charged

Kentucky AG's Daniel Cameron criticizes "celebrities, influencers and activists" for telling people how to feel about the outcome of the Breonna Taylor case – even though they have never lived in the state

Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron has called out "celebrities, influencers, and activists" to weigh the grand jury's findings on the Breonna Taylor case

Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron has called out "celebrities, influencers, and activists" to weigh the grand jury's findings on the Breonna Taylor case

Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron called on "celebrities, influencers and activists" to weigh the grand jury's findings on the Breonna Taylor case and said they were "trying to tell us how to feel."

Cameron spoke at a press conference on Wednesday announcing that a grand jury of the grand jury had not brought charges against the Louisville police for the March murder of Breonna Taylor.

"Each (case) is unique and cannot be compared," said Cameron, predicting an inevitable outcry from celebrities over the grand jury results.

“There will be celebrities, influencers and activists who have never lived in Kentucky. They will try to tell us how to feel and suggest that they understand the facts of this case and know our community and the Commonwealth better than we do. But they don't, ”he said.

Let's not give in to their attempts to influence our thinking or capture our emotions. At the end of the day, it's up to us. We live together here, ”added Cameron.

Cameron said that Its job is to "put everything aside to reach the truth".

"Our response to the truth is the society we want to be," he said. “Do we really want the truth? Or do we want a truth that fits our narrative? Do we want the facts? Are we satisfied with blindly accepting our own version of events? We as a community have to make that decision. & # 39;

Cameron, a Republican, is a rising star in the party and was lauded on Wednesday by President Donald Trump, who said he handled the Taylor case "very well".

The grand jury sued one of the three officers fired during the March 13 robbery on three counts of willful endangerment of Brett Hankison for alleged wildfire targeting a neighboring apartment.

The other two officers were not charged. The grand jury found their actions were justified after Taylor's friend opened fire and beat an officer.

Prominente wie die Schauspielerin Viola Davis, der Schöpfer und Star von 'Schitt's Creek', Dan Levy, der Schauspieler George Clooney, der Rapper Common und der Star der Los Angeles Lakers, LeBron James, haben sich über die Entscheidung der Grand Jury empört.

Davis drückte ihre Empörung online aus und nannte das Ergebnis eine "Bulls *** Entscheidung !!!"

'SCHWARZE LEBEN ZÄHLEN !!! Kann nicht oft genug gesagt werden “, fuhr die mit dem Oscar ausgezeichnete Schauspielerin, 55, fort und postete auch Nachrichten von NAACP und TV One neu.

"Skandal" -Star Kerry Washington drückte ihre Wut aus, als sie einen Beitrag der ACLU teilte, in dem es heißt: "Das heutige Urteil ist keine Rechenschaftspflicht und nicht der Gerechtigkeit nahe."

Später kritisierte sie den Generalstaatsanwalt von Kentucky, Daniel Cameron, für sein politisches Handeln und twitterte: „Daniel Cameron steht auf Donald Trumps Shortlist als Ersatz für #RGB am Obersten Gerichtshof. Derselbe Mann, der beschlossen hat, die für die Tötung von #BreonnaTaylor verantwortlichen Beamten nicht anzuklagen. Abstimmung.'

Levy schrieb in einem Tweet, er sei angewidert. Wütend. Mit gebrochenem Herzen über die Entscheidung und ermutigte seine Anhänger, an eine Kaution für Demonstranten in Louisville zu spenden. 'Bitte tragen Sie bei, wenn Sie können. Gerechtigkeit sollte kein Luxus sein «, schrieb Levy.

Clooney, ein gebürtiger Kentuckyer, sagte, er schäme sich für die Entscheidung der Grand Jury.

"Das Justizsystem, an das ich glauben wollte, macht die Menschen für ihre Handlungen verantwortlich", sagte Clooney in einer Erklärung gegenüber Deadline.

Sie hieß Breonna Taylor und wurde in ihrem Bett von drei weißen Polizisten erschossen, denen für ihren Tod kein Verbrechen zur Last gelegt wird. Ich kenne die Community. Ich kenne das Commonwealth. Und mir wurde in den Schulen und Kirchen von Kentucky beigebracht, was richtig und was falsch ist. Ich schäme mich für diese Entscheidung «, sagte Clooney.

NBA-Star James twitterte: „Ich bin heute sprachlos geworden! Ich bin am Boden zerstört, verletzt, traurig, verrückt! Wir wollen Gerechtigkeit für Breonna, aber Gerechtigkeit wurde für die Wände ihrer Nachbarn und nicht für ihr schönes Leben erreicht. War ich überrascht über das Urteil? Absolut nicht, aber ich war und bin verletzt und schwerherzig! & # 39;

Regisseur Ava DuVernay sandte eine mitfühlende Botschaft an Breonnas Lieben und twitterte: „Gott segne Breonnas Familie und alle, die sie kannten und liebten.

Ihr tragischer Tod, der durch die Gewalt des Schweigens und die Untätigkeit der Stadt, die sie zu Hause anrief, noch verstärkt wird, ist mehr als jeder von ihnen ertragen sollte.

Gib zurück: 'Angewidert. Wütend. Mit gebrochenem Herzen “, schrieb Dan Levy und forderte die Anhänger auf, einen Beitrag zum Louisville Community Bail Fund zu leisten

Gib zurück: 'Angewidert. Wütend. Mit gebrochenem Herzen “, schrieb Dan Levy und forderte die Anhänger auf, einen Beitrag zum Louisville Community Bail Fund zu leisten

Common teilte ein ergreifendes Zitat des Schriftstellers James Baldwin mit und twitterte: "Ein Neger in diesem Land zu sein und relativ bewusst zu sein, bedeutet, fast die ganze Zeit in einem Zustand der Wut zu sein." James Baldwin. #BreonnaTaylor. & # 39;

Er folgte mit einem weiteren sengenden Zitat von Malcolm X, das lautete: „Wenn Sie mir ein Messer in den Rücken stecken und es herausziehen, gibt es keine Fortschritte.

„Wenn du es ganz herausziehst, ist das kein Fortschritt. Der Fortschritt heilt die Wunde, die der Schlag verursacht hat. Sie werden nicht einmal zugeben, dass das Messer da ist. & # 39;

MLKs Tochter Bernice King selbst teilte ihre Trauer um Taylors Familie und schrieb: „Ich bete für Breonnas Mutter und Familie. Weil sie sie kannten und liebten, bevor ihr Name zum Hashtag wurde. & # 39;

Padma Lakshmi, Gastgeber und Richter des Spitzenkochs, schrieb: „Was wir heute gesehen haben, war keine Gerechtigkeit. Möge Breonna Taylors Geist an der Macht ruhen, während wir alle den Kampf #justiceforbreonnataylor fortsetzen. & # 39;

Die Schauspielerin Yvette Nicole Brown war empört und schrieb: „Nein. Offiziere. Berechnet. Im. Das. Tötung. Von. #BreonnaTaylor. Einer. War. Berechnet. Zum. Gefährdung. Aber. NICHT. Tötung. Ihr. Nachbarn. #MakeMeWannaHollerAndThrowUpBothMyHands. & # 39;

Sängerin / This Is Us-Star Mandy Moore war sprachlos und sagte der Öffentlichkeit: „Ich habe keine Worte. #BreonnaTaylor und ihre Familie verdienen Gerechtigkeit. & # 39;

Auf Instagram teilte Mandy ein Porträt von Breonna mit der Überschrift, in der sie ihre Unterstützung für Black Lives Matter zum Ausdruck brachte, und schrieb den Beitrag: „Die heutigen Nachrichten sind verheerend und ärgerlich und weisen auf ein elend kaputtes System hin.

'Breonna Taylors Leben hatte Wert. Sie und ihre Familie verdienen Gerechtigkeit. Schwarze Frauen sind wichtig. Schwarze Leben zählen.'

"Also ist niemand dafür verantwortlich, #BreonnaTaylor zu töten?" fragte sich Mia Farrow.

Protests broke out in cities across the country as thousands gathered to decipher the Taylor decision.

In New York City, hundreds of people came to the Barclays Center in Brooklyn, where they kneeled in Taylor's honor and listened to various activists, and outside Grand Central Station in Manhattan.

Im Norden von Buffalo wurde ein Demonstrant während einer Demonstration auf dem Niagara-Platz der Stadt von einem Kleintransporter angefahren. The protester was hospitalized with non-life threatening injuries and the driver of the truck was run over.

In Illinois, Gov J.B. Pritzker said he had spoken to the National Guard about preparing for protests and had contacted Mayor Lori Lightfoot of Chicago.

About 300 people gathered in Palmer Square Park on Chicago's northwest side before setting off on a march Wednesday evening, chanting Taylor's name. The march was monitored by police officers on bicycles.

Other demonstrators gathered in downtown's Millennium Park chanting demands for justice as passing motorists on Michigan Avenue honked their horns.

Activist priest the Rev Michael Pfleger told protesters gathered in the middle of an intersection that they should peacefully let those who represent the status quo know of their unhappiness with the Taylor decision.

'We're here tonight because we do care,' Pfleger said. 'And we're here because we want to say: 'We object and we don't accept it. Somebody has to be held accountable.''

In Atlanta, Georgia State Police were seen setting tear gas canisters on protesters who refused to disperse.

Another large crowd formed in the capital, Washington DC, when city officials began blocking roads.

NEW YORK: Protesters gather outside the Barclays Center in Brooklyn on Wednesday night

NEW YORK: Protesters gather outside the Barclays Center in Brooklyn on Wednesday night

NEW YORK: Protesters outside the Barclays Center demand justice in the murder of Breonna Taylor

NEW YORK: Protesters outside the Barclays Center demand justice in the murder of Breonna Taylor

BOSTON: Protesters take part in a Justice for Breonna vigil in Boston on Wednesday evening

BOSTON: Protesters take part in a Justice for Breonna vigil in Boston on Wednesday evening

WASHINGTON DC: Demonstrators march near the White House on Wednesday night

WASHINGTON DC: Demonstrators march near the White House on Wednesday night

WASHINGTON DC: A massive crowd made their way through the National Mall chanting Breonna Taylor's name

WASHINGTON DC: A massive crowd made their way through the National Mall chanting Breonna Taylor's name

Anger as only one police officer is accused of endangering neighbors with wild fire in Breonna Taylor's death and two others run for FREE

The discharged Louisville detective Brett Hankison was charged on the night of March 13 of three willful threats in connection with the police raid

The discharged Louisville detective Brett Hankison was charged on the night of March 13 of three willful threats in connection with the police raid

Jefferson County Circuit Judge Annie O & # 39; Connell announced on Wednesday the grand jury's decision to indict former detective Brett Hankison of three willful threats related to the police raid on the night of March 13th.

The first degree indictment, a Class D crime punishable by up to five years in prison, relates to the fact that Hankinson shot in the neighboring apartments during the incident, not Taylor's death.

Hankinson was fired from the Louisville Metro Police Department in June after officials said he violated guidelines by "willfully and blindly" firing his gun during the robbery.

Sgt Jonathan Mattingly and Detective Myles Cosgrove, who were also present at the time of the fatal operation, were not charged.

Neither the grand jury nor the presiding judge addressed the indictment.

Attorney General Daniel Cameron addressed the long-awaited decision at a press conference in Frankfurt shortly after the announcement.

Cameron revealed the investigation found:

  • Sergeant Mattingly and Detectives Cosgrove and Hankison had no known involvement in obtaining the March 13th search warrant.
  • Mattingly was the first and only officer to enter the residence, where he saw Taylor's friend Kenneth Walker by an open fire.
  • There is no evidence that Sergeant Mattingly was hit by friendly fire from other officers.
  • Mattingly returned fire with six shots. Almost at the same time, Detective Cosgrove also shot 16 times in the doorway.
  • A total of six bullets struck Taylor, but only one was classified as fatal.
  • Detective Hankison fired his gun ten times and shot bullets in Apartment 4 and Apartment 3.
  • At that time, three residents of Apartment 3 were at home, including a man, a pregnant woman and a child.
  • There is no conclusive evidence that bullets fired from Detective Hankison's gun hit Taylor.
  • The ballistic analysis did not reveal which of the three officers had fired the fatal shot.
  • The FBI investigation later revealed that the fatal shot was fired by Detective Cosgrove.
  • The investigation found that Mattingly and Cosgrove were justified in the use of force after Walker opened fire.

He gave a detailed account of the months of investigation into the events that led to the fatal shooting. He said they were put together through ballistic reports, 911 calls and witness interviews due to the lack of bodycam footage.

But Cameron, who is the state's first black attorney general, said the officers weren't charged for defending themselves after Taylor's friend shot them.

“I certainly understand the pain caused by the tragic loss of Miss Taylor. Ich verstehe das als Generalstaatsanwalt … Ich verstehe das als schwarzer Mann «, sagte Cameron gegenüber Reportern.

„Dieses Team, ich und die Vertreter der Generalstaatsanwaltschaft haben viel Kritik und Kontrolle erfahren. Aber diese Prüfung war in vielerlei Hinsicht fehl am Platz, weil es keinen Tag gab, an dem die Leute in diesem Büro nicht schlafen gingen und über diesen Fall nachdachten.

Die Polizei von Louisville hat vor der Ankündigung des Generalstaatsanwalts von Kentucky, Daniel Cameron, den Ausnahmezustand erklärt, ob er Beamte beschuldigen wird, die am Tod von Breonna Taylor beteiligt sind (Bild)

Die Polizei von Louisville hat vor der Ankündigung des Generalstaatsanwalts von Kentucky, Daniel Cameron, den Ausnahmezustand erklärt, ob er Beamte beschuldigen wird, die am Tod von Breonna Taylor beteiligt sind (Bild)

Myles Cosgrove

John Mattingly

Die Beamten Myles Cosgrove (links) und John Mattingly (rechts), die während der Razzia am 13. März anwesend waren, wurden am Mittwoch nicht angeklagt. Hankison wurde von der LMPD entlassen, während die beiden anderen Beamten einen Verwaltungsauftrag erhielten

„Das Strafrecht soll nicht auf jede Trauer und Trauer reagieren, und das gilt hier. Aber mein Herz bricht für den Verlust von Miss Taylor «, sagte die AG.

Die Ermittler glauben, dass Cosgrove für das Abfeuern der Kugel verantwortlich war, die Taylor das Leben gekostet hat. Taylor wurde mindestens fünf Mal erschossen, nachdem Beamte in ihre Wohnung gestürmt waren, als sie auf einen Durchsuchungsbefehl für eine Drogenuntersuchung reagierten.

Ihr Freund Kenneth Walker eröffnete das Feuer, als die Polizei einbrach und Mattingly traf. Walker wurde wegen versuchten Mordes an einem Polizisten angeklagt, aber die Staatsanwaltschaft ließ die Anklage später fallen.

Walker hatte der Polizei gesagt, er habe Klopfen gehört, wusste aber nicht, wer ins Haus kam und zur Selbstverteidigung feuerte.

Cameron sagte, Cosgrove und Mattingly seien nicht angeklagt worden, nachdem die Ermittler festgestellt hatten, dass ihre Handlungen gerechtfertigt waren, weil Walker das Feuer eröffnet hatte.

"Nach dem Gesetz von Kentucky war die Anwendung von Gewalt durch (Officers Jonathan) Mattingly und (Myles) Cosgrove gerechtfertigt, um sich selbst zu schützen", sagte er. "Diese Rechtfertigung hindert uns daran, bei Miss Breonna Taylors Tod strafrechtliche Anklage zu erheben."

Die drei Beamten hätten sich nicht an der Erlangung des Haftbefehls beteiligt, sagte er.

Die Razzia wurde von den Medien weithin als "No-Knock" -Befehl gemeldet. Weitere Untersuchungen ergaben jedoch später, dass die Polizei vor dem Betreten geklopft hatte.

Walker hatte den Ermittlern auch gesagt, er habe Klopfen gehört, aber behauptet, die Polizei habe sich nicht als Polizei identifiziert.

Sie klopften an Taylors Wohnungstür und kündigten ihre Anwesenheit draußen an, was laut Cameron von einem Nachbarn bestätigt wurde, der Zeuge der Ankunft war.

Cameron erhielt keine Antwort und sagte, Polizisten hätten die Tür durchbrochen und Zutritt zur Wohnung erhalten.

Mattingly trat zuerst ein und sah am Ende eines Korridors Taylor und Walker, der eine Waffe richtete.

Walker feuerte und verletzte Mattingly am Oberschenkel. Mattingly erwiderte das Feuer und seine Kollegen begannen bald darauf zu schießen, sagte Cameron. Hankison hat 10 Kugeln abgefeuert, sagte Cameron.

Sechs Kugeln trafen Taylor, obwohl es keine "schlüssigen" Beweise dafür gibt, dass irgendwelche von Hankinsons Waffe stammten, sagte Cameron. Von Hankison abgefeuerte Kugeln gingen in eine benachbarte Wohnung.

Die letzten Momente in Breonna Taylors Leben: Cops riefen eine Warnung, bevor sie die Tür einschlugen, ihr Freund schoss zuerst und sie starb neben ihm im Flur, nachdem die Polizei 32 Kugeln abgefeuert hatte

Die drei an der tödlichen Schießerei auf Breonna Taylor beteiligten Beamten feuerten 32 Mal, nachdem sie in ihre Wohnung gestürmt waren, aber nur ein Schuss wurde als tödlich eingestuft, stellten die Ermittler fest.

Die Grand Jury von Jefferson County gab am Mittwoch die Ergebnisse ihrer Untersuchung zum Tod der 26-jährigen EMT bekannt, die am 13. März bei einem Polizeieinsatz in ihrer Wohnung getötet wurde.

Der im Juni entlassene Louisville-Offizier Brett Hankison wurde wegen dreier mutwilliger Gefährdung angeklagt, weil er in die Häuser von Taylors Nachbarn geschossen hatte.

Sgt Jonathan Mattingly und Detective Myles Cosgrove, die ebenfalls während des tödlichen Überfalls anwesend waren, wurden nicht angeklagt.

In einer Pressekonferenz kurz nach der Entscheidung der Grand Jury gab der Generalstaatsanwalt von Kentucky, Daniel Cameron, einen detaillierten Bericht über die Abfolge der Ereignisse, die seiner Meinung nach durch ballistische Berichte, Notrufe und Zeugeninterviews aufgrund des Mangels an Bodycam-Filmmaterial zusammengesetzt wurden .

Die Untersuchung beleuchtete Taylors letzte Momente und ergab, dass sie insgesamt sechs Mal erschossen wurde, als sie neben ihrem Freund Kenneth Walker im Flur ihres Hauses stand.

In the early hours of March 13, Louisville police officers entered apartment 4 of 3003 Springfield Drive, firing 32 times. Breonna Taylor was shot six times, but only one was determined to be fatal

In the early hours of March 13, Louisville police officers entered apartment 4 of 3003 Springfield Drive, firing 32 times. Breonna Taylor was shot six times, but only one was determined to be fatal

Earlier reports had said Taylor was sleeping in bed when officers barged in and opened fire.

It also confirmed cops did indeed knock after serving a warrant at apartment 4 of 3003 Springfield Drive in the early hours of March 13.

According to investigators' findings, Taylor was shot a total of six times, but medical evidence indicated that only one shot was fatal.

'Further medical evidence shows Ms Taylor would have died from the fatal shot within a few seconds to two minutes after being struck,' Cameron said.

Walker was determined to have fired the first round, striking Sgt Mattingly in the leg.

Mattingly was the only officer to enter the apartment, where he said he found Walker holding a gun.

'In his statement (Mattingly) says that the male was holding a gun, arms extended, in a shooting stance,' Cameron said.

'Sergeant Mattingly saw the man's gun fire, heard a boom and immediately knew he was shot as a result of feeling heat in his upper thigh.'

Cameron confirmed Walker shot Mattingly in the leg and there was no evidence to support the cop was hit by friendly fire from other officers.

During the shooting, Mattingly fired six shots, Cosgrove fired 16, and Hankinson fired 10, according to the report.

Walker also previously admitted that he fired one shot and was the first to shoot.

Crime scene photos from the investigation show a number of shell casings in and near the EMT's apartment after she was shot dead by police on March 13

Crime scene photos from the investigation show a number of shell casings in and near the EMT's apartment after she was shot dead by police on March 13

Bullet holes and blood smeared on the walls could be seen in one evidence photo from inside Taylor's apartment after she was shot dead

Bullet holes and blood smeared on the walls could be seen in one evidence photo from inside Taylor's apartment after she was shot dead

'Sergeant Mattingly returned fire down the hallway. Mattingly fired six shots. Almost at the same time, Detective Cosgrove also shot 16 times in the doorway. This all took place in a matter of seconds,' Cameron said. 'In total, six bullets struck Ms Taylor.'

Meanwhile, Detective Hankison, who was the only cop charged in the case, had fired his weapon ten times including from an outside sliding glass door and through a bedroom window.

'Some bullets traveled through apartment 4 and into apartment 3 before some exited that apartment,' Cameron said.

'At the time, three residents of apartment 3  were at home including a male, a pregnant female, and a child.

'There is no conclusive evidence that any bullets fired from detective Hankison's weapon struck Ms Taylor,' Cameron said.

The AG said initial ballistics reports were unable to determined which of the three officers fired the shot that killed Taylor.

Cameron then commissioned the FBI Crime lab to conduct a separate analysis to see if they reached the same results.

'Ballistics analysis concluded the fatal shot was fired by Detective Cosgrove.

'Our officers looked at both reports to determine if there were major differences in the procedures used by each lab that would have led the FBI to identify who fired the fatal shot.

'Both law enforcement agencies used similar equipment and analysis. Each lab is highly respected for their work.

'There was nothing our investigators could point to nor anything provided by the respective agencies that directly explains why one lab made the call while another did not,' Cameron said.

Taylor's living room was left riddled with bullets after the March 13 shooting by police

Taylor's living room was left riddled with bullets after the March 13 shooting by police

The charges stem from Hankison's bullets travelling into a neighboring apartment when he and two other officers opened fire. Pictured above are the bullet holes found in Taylor's apartment

The charges stem from Hankison's bullets travelling into a neighboring apartment when he and two other officers opened fire. Pictured above are the bullet holes found in Taylor's apartment

Trump says Kentucky AG Daniel Cameron is a 'star' and has handled the Breonna Taylor case 'very well' when asked to comment on today's grand jury decision

President Donald Trump praised Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron's 'fantastic' handling of the Breonna Taylor case after a grand jury indicted a single officer in connection with her killing.

Trump called Cameron 'really brilliant' and a 'star' when asked about the result of the attorney general's investigation on Wednesday afternoon.

It came after Cameron announced that fired officer Brett Hankison had been indicted on three charges of wanton endangerment for the botched raid that killed 26-year-old Taylor on March 13.

The charges related to Hankison shooting into the homes of Taylor's neighbors, not her death. The other two officers involved in the raid were not charged.

The grand jury decision was met with immediate backlash as hundreds of protesters began marching through downtown Louisville and clashing with police.

Trump, who has repeatedly railed against Black Lives Matter protesters, applauded Kentucky Gov Andy Beshear's decision to deploy the National Guard as tensions mounted in the city.

President Donald Trump praised Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron's 'fantastic' handling of the Breonna Taylor case at a press conference on Wednesday after a grand jury indicted a single officer in connection with her killing

Trump called Cameron (pictured) 'really brilliant' and a 'star'

President Donald Trump (left) praised Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron (right) for his 'fantastic' handling of the Breonna Taylor case at a press conference on Wednesday after a grand jury indicted a single officer in connection with her killing

The president's press conference came to an abrupt end when he said he had to take an 'emergency phone call' as a reporters tried to ask him more questions about the Taylor case.

'Mr. President, just one more question if I can about Breonna Taylor. People are protesting in the streets. What is your message to that?' a reporter asked right before Trump walked out.

Trump briefly addressed the case earlier in the afternoon, but punted when asked if he believed justice had been served.

The president spoke instead about his own record – once again comparing it to Abraham Lincoln's – and said he would comment on the case later.

A reporter had asked Trump: 'Do you believe that justice was served in he Breonna Taylor case in Kentucky, and what is your message to the black community who believe that perhaps justice was not served by the decision which was rendered by the decision that was rendered by the grand jury in Kentucky?'

He responded: 'Well, my message is that I love the black community. And I've done more for the black community than any other president. And I say, with the possible exception of Abraham Lincoln,' Trump said, before rattling off accomplishments, some of which built on existing programs or included Democratic buy-in.

'And mean that with opportunities zones and with criminal justice reform, with prison reform, with what we've done for historically black universities, colleges, schools, what we've done – nobody has done more.

'Abraham Lincoln, let's give him the nod, but beyond that, nobody's done more. I love the black community.'

He steered clear of any substantive language on the verdict itself, as authorities in Louisville declared a curfew and lined the streets to quell unrest.

'I don't know enough about it. I heard the decision was just made. We've been together here, and so we haven't discussed it. But after I see what the decision is, I will have a comment on it,' Trump said.

Joe Biden made vague remarks when asked about the grand jury decision on a tarmac in Charlotte, North Carolina, on Wednesday evening (pictured)

Joe Biden made vague remarks when asked about the grand jury decision on a tarmac in Charlotte, North Carolina, on Wednesday evening (pictured)

Kamala Harris also declined to offer her opinion on the indictment, saying: 'I haven't read it fully yet, but there's no question that Breonna Taylor and her family deserve justice yesterday, today and tomorrow so I'll review it'

Kamala Harris also declined to offer her opinion on the indictment, saying: 'I haven't read it fully yet, but there's no question that Breonna Taylor and her family deserve justice yesterday, today and tomorrow so I'll review it'

Rival Joe Biden made similarly vague remarks when asked about the grand jury decision on a tarmac in Charlotte, North Carolina.

The Democratic presidential nominee claimed he hadn't received enough information to comment fully but said: 'My heart goes out to (Taylor's) mother.'

He also urged protesters to keep their demonstrations peaceful.

'Do not sully her memory or her mother's by engaging in any violence. It's totally inappropriate for that to happen,' Biden said. 'She wouldn't want it, nor would her mother, so I hope they do that.'

Biden's running mate, Sen Kamala Harris, also declined to share her opinion on the indictment.

'I haven't read it fully yet, but there's no question that Breonna Taylor and her family deserve justice yesterday, today and tomorrow so I'll review it,' said the Senate Judiciary Committee member.

Harris tweeted back in June: 'The officers who murdered Breonna Taylor nearly three months ago still have not been charged. We can't forget about Black women in our quest for justice.'

A timeline of events related to the shooting death of Breonna Taylor

– March 13: Officers serving a narcotics warrant fatally shoot Taylor in her home in Louisville, Kentucky.

– March 13, hours later: Police announce the arrest of Kenneth Walker in the wounding of an officer during an exchange of gunfire; Taylor is left unidentified at the news conference, described as 'an unresponsive woman who was later pronounced dead.'

– March, April: The shooting stays out of the headlines as the COVID-19 pandemic spreads in the U.S.

– April 27, Taylor's family files wrongful death lawsuit against police department and city, challenging the police narrative.

– May 13: Top Louisville prosecutor Tom Wine recuses himself from reviewing police investigation, Attorney General Daniel Cameron named as special prosecutor.

– May 22: Prosecutors announce they will drop attempted murder charges against Walker, who shot at officers in his girlfriend's home.

– May 28: Walker's anguished 911 call is released, three days after the death of George Floyd at the hands of police in Minnesota, sparking large protests in Louisville.

– May 29: Mayor Greg Fischer suspends use of no-knock warrants by Louisville police.

– June 1: Fischer fires Police Chief Steve Conrad after officers failed to turn on body cameras in shooting of barbecue cook David McAtee during protests in Louisville.

– June 11: Louisville Metro Council unanimously passes 'Breonna´s Law' which bans use of no knock warrants.

– June 14: Pop star Beyoncé writes Attorney General Daniel Cameron, urging him to charge police officers.

– June 23: Officer Brett Hankison, one of 3 officers who fired shots the night of Taylor's death, is fired for 'blindly' firing into Taylor´s apartment.

– June 25: Celebrities join hundreds of demonstrators outside state Capitol calling on Cameron to charge officers.

– June 28: Photographer Tyler Gerth is fatally shot at site of ongoing protests in downtown Louisville.

– July 14: Protesters are arrested for demonstrating on Cameron´s front lawn.

– August 12: Taylor´s mother, Tamika Palmer, meets with Cameron.

– September  5: Hundreds peacefully protest outside Kentucky Derby, urging Cameron to criminally charge the officers.

– September 7: Fischer names Yvette Gentry, first Black woman to lead Louisville Police department, as interim chief beginning Oct. 1.

– September 9: Cameron is included on President Donald Trump's shortlist of Supreme Court candidates.

– September 15: City announces civil settlement providing Taylor´s family with $12 million and promising police reforms.

– September 22: Louisville police set up blockades downtown in anticipation of Cameron's announcement.

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