ENTERTAINMENT

Magical moment The four-year-old boy has been suffering from sepsis for the first time since both legs were lost


Heartwarming material shows the magical moment of a little boy who lost both legs due to sepsis. goes into the arms of his fond grandma for the first time.

William Reckless, four, of Sutton-in-Ashfield, Nottinghamshire, almost died when he contracted a life-threatening case of sepsis in January.

The brave boy fought the deadly infection and underwent multiple amputations, losing both his lower leg and parts of nine fingers – only his right thumb remained intact.

The heartwarming video shows the magical moment when he kicks the arms of his infatuated grandma Trish Brennan for the first time

William Reckless, 4, of Sutton-in-Ashfield, takes his first steps unaided after losing both lower legs due to sepsis

Smiling face of determination: William Reckless grins cheekily as he travels outdoors with father Michael and his family

Smiling face of determination: William Reckless grins cheekily as he travels outdoors with father Michael and his family

However, William has made amazing strides and an online video shows him He took his first steps with his new prosthetic legs.

The video, which was recorded in Trish Brennan's house in Killamarsh, captures the magical moment when William kicks her arms without help.

She holds her arms open and encourages William by counting his steps as he slowly walks towards them.

"Come on buddy, you can do it," she says. "Further, you are fine. A little bit more … & # 39;

William makes it into her arms and is rewarded with a cuddle and a kiss.

The videosHow quickly he has made progress in the past few months – since he took his new legs home in May and can walk alone until mid-July.

Mother, Gemma Reckless, 30, a Sheffield police officer, said it was "magic" to watch her son take his first steps after the months of pain.

The little fighter was amputated several times and lost both his lower legs and parts of nine fingers. He is shown here with mother Gemma (30), whose leg prosthesis is adapted

The little fighter was amputated several times and lost both his lower legs and parts of nine fingers. He is shown here with mother Gemma (30), whose leg prosthesis is adapted

The little boy became seriously ill in January after developing sepsis under scarlet fever

The little boy became seriously ill in January after developing sepsis under scarlet fever

He spent three months in the intensive care unit. Pictured here with little sister Georgia, two, and father Michael

He spent three months in the intensive care unit. Pictured here with little sister Georgia, two, and father Michael

William's sister Georgia puts a hand on her brother William, who is lying in hospital bed during the sepsis fight

William's sister Georgia puts a hand on her brother William, who is lying in hospital bed during the sepsis fight

"When your baby takes the first steps, it's magical," she said.

"But if you have to learn a second time after watching your pain, fear, frustration, hard work, and determination for months, the pride we feel is something else."

William Reckless became seriously ill in January after developing sepsis while suffering from scarlet fever.

He almost died when his heart stopped and he had to be in intensive care for three months fighting complications that resulted in his lower legs and parts of his fingers being amputated.

However, his family says the little boy never stopped smiling during the physiotherapist's months.

His mother Gemma said that when he was told he was going to lose his legs, he seemed to accept everything he woke from the amputation with a smile on his face.

He soon told doctors and nurses that his left leg had been eaten by a crocodile and the right leg by a shark.

His mother documented her son's trip on her Facebook page for Business Little Gems.

Smile with his new legs: William Reckless, 4, with his prosthesis in the hospital after the sepsis took both his limbs off

Smile with his new legs: William Reckless, 4, with his prosthesis in the hospital after the sepsis took both his limbs off

William Reckless, pictured with father Michael, sister Georgia and mother Gemma at home

William Reckless, pictured with father Michael, sister Georgia and mother Gemma at home

She wrote: "I never wanted to share this trip, I wish we had never experienced it, but the support and love of this community meant that we gained a huge family of people who invested in William, and I am grateful for that . "

What are the main symptoms of sepsis? The "silent killer" who can lead to death in a few minutes

Sepsis, known as a "silent killer", occurs when an infection such as blood poisoning triggers a violent immune response that causes the body to attack its own organs.

It is a potentially life-threatening illness that is triggered by an infection or injury. According to the British Sepsis Trust, around 245,000 people in the UK fall ill with sepsis and 52,000 die each year.

Instead of attacking the invading beetle, the body switches itself on and switches off vital organs.

If caught early enough, it can be easily treated with intravenous antibiotics and fluids. However, these have to be administered as soon as sepsis is suspected – it strikes at an alarming rate and with an hourly delay, the patient's probability of death increases by 8 percent.

Sepsis is a major cause of avoidable deaths that kill 44,000 people each year

Sepsis is a major cause of avoidable deaths that kill 44,000 people each year

The early symptoms of sepsis can easily be confused with milder conditions, which means that the diagnosis can be difficult.

High temperature (fever), chills and tremors, a fast heartbeat and rapid breathing are also indicators.

A patient can quickly deteriorate if sepsis is overlooked early. Rapid diagnosis and treatment is therefore crucial – but this rarely happens.

In the early stages, sepsis can be mistaken for a breast infection, flu, or upset stomach.

It is most common and most dangerous in older adults, pregnant women, children under the age of one, people with chronic illnesses or people with weakened immune systems.

The six signs of something potentially fatal can be identified with the acronym "SEPSIS":

  • Blurred speech or confusion
  • Extreme tremors or muscle pain
  • Do not give urine in one day
  • Severe shortness of breath
  • Skin blotchy or discolored

Anyone who develops any of these symptoms should see a doctor urgently – and the doctors ask, "Could this be sepsis?"

. (tagsToTranslate) Dailymail (t) messages