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Lorraine Chase is suing £ 100,000 in a Channel 5 abseil accident that ended her Panto career


Emmerdale star Lorraine Chase is suing £ 100,000 over a reality TV rappelling accident that she claims has ended her pantomime career.

The former model, who rose to fame in a series of Campari ads as the "Luton Airport Girl" in the 1970s, has worked and mimes on reality television for the past several years.

However, the 69-year-old claims she will have to give up her stage career and retire after a serious accident while filming.

Ms. Chase was starring alongside Debbie McGee, Simon Callow and Nigel Havers on Channel 5's "Carry on Barging" when she fell and injured her back while rappelling.

She accuses her instructor from the adventure company TNR Coaching Ltd for letting the rope out too far and dropping her.

But the company is fighting the lawsuit in Central London County Court on the grounds that the accident was Chase's fault "because she ignored her instructions."

From left: Simon Callow, Lorraine Chase, Debbie McGee and Nigel Havers on Celebrity Carry On Barging

Lorraine Chase was playing "Carry on Barging" with Debbie McGee, Simon Callow and Nigel Havers on Channel 5's when she fell and injured her back while rappelling

Lorraine Chase was playing "Carry on Barging" with Debbie McGee, Simon Callow and Nigel Havers when she fell and injured her back while rappelling

Chase Bernie Clifton in Aladin at St. Albans Arena

Chase Bernie Clifton in Aladin at St. Albans Arena

Ms. Chase first became known as the glamorous Cockney star in a series of Campari ads in the 1970s

Ms. Chase first became known as the glamorous Cockney star in a series of Campari ads in the 1970s

Ms. Chase's attorney, David White, told a judge that the accident ruined her career in the Panto.

He said she hit her back after falling on a ledge, causing injuries to her neck and back, and has since retired.

"In her case, she continues to have symptoms in the areas that affect her ability to perform and work as an actress, especially in panto," he said.

"Her case is that she would do a panto every season and she couldn't because of the persistent symptoms she suffered in the accident."

Ms. Chase first rose to fame as the glamorous Cockney star in a series of Campari ads in the 1970s when, when asked by her co-star if she was flown in from paradise, she famously replied, "No, Luton Airport . "

She starred in Blankety Blank, Worzil Gummidge and as Steph Stokes in Emmerdale, and starred in reality television shows like Come Dine With Me and I'm a Celebrity Get Me Out of Here.

She was filming Channel 5's Carry on Barging, which featured celebrities piloting barges on the Kennet, Avon and Llangollen channels when the accident occurred in Wales in October 2016.

Her attorney said the adventure company was "operational" "controlling the rate of descent of the applicant [but] releasing too much rope too quickly and without ensuring that the applicant had stepped back to fill the void".

He added, "Either the operator controlling the rope could not see the applicant, or he was not watching them properly – or not at all – as he let out the rope."

On behalf of TNR Coaching Ltd, attorney Lawrence Jones argued that the accident was entirely the actress's fault.

He said Chase "ignored" instructions from a safety briefing and took a horizontal position during the maneuver, as she had done in previous rappelling sessions, although she was told it was not safe to do so.

Ms. Chase's action for damages, which has been ruled by her attorneys up to £ 100,000, is due to be brought before a judge at a later date. In the picture Ms. Chase at the party for the 50th anniversary of Tramp Nightclub in 2019

Ms. Chase's action for damages, which has been ruled by her attorneys up to £ 100,000, is due to be brought before a judge at a later date. In the picture Ms. Chase at the party for the 50th anniversary of Tramp Nightclub in 2019

The defendant asked the applicant to keep her feet below her waist instead. The instructions were clear and left no room for misunderstanding, ”added Mr. Jones.

The applicant understood the instructions but ignored them. She took a horizontal position, lost her balance, and turned backwards.

"Had she followed the defendant's instructions, she would not have lost her balance."

Mr Jones accepted that the TNR trainer should have acted faster to stop Ms. Chase from ignoring his instructions, but said the accident would not have happened if she had done what she was told.

He said Ms. Chase already had back, leg and neck conditions and still had a back injury at the time after falling on a boat in Zambia.

"The applicant should not have volunteered to rappel given her pre-existing injury and condition," he added.

Ms. Chase's action for damages, which has been ruled by her attorneys up to £ 100,000, is due to be brought before a judge at a later date.