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London's hospitals will be overwhelmed by Covid patients in TWO weeks, a strong NHS briefing warns


London's hospitals will be overwhelmed by Covid-19 in less than two weeks, even in a "best-case" scenario, an official briefing warns.

NHS London Medical Director Vin Diwakar delivered the worrying analysis to medical directors of the capital's hospital trusts this afternoon via a Zoom call.

Even if coronavirus patients were least likely to grow and capacity increased – including the opening of the nightingale – the NHS would still have 2,000 general, acute, and ICU beds by Jan. 19, the HSJ reports.

For both G&A and intensive care, three scenarios are set: "Best", "Average" and "Bad". These are responsible for the effects of a daily growth of four percent, a growth of five percent and a growth of six percent.

Growth for G&A beds was 3.5 percent on January 5 and 4.8 percent for intensive care beds, the report said.

It comes after the UK injured 1,000 daily coronavirus deaths for the first time since April and reported another record number of cases with 62,322 more positive tests.

Health Department data shows the grim number of 1,041 laboratory-confirmed deaths – only the 10th time the UK has passed the milestone – is the UK's highest daily number since April 21.

And experts fear the death toll will continue to rise as the rising cases over the past three weeks translate into more deaths as people get sick.

Statistics show it is the third day in a row that the UK has had a record number of cases, down from 60,916 yesterday and 58,784 the previous day. It's also 24.6 percent higher than last Wednesday's 50,023.

Another day of the coronavirus mayhem:

  • The crackdown on COVID in the UK began after pictures showed masked police officers handcuffing retirees and protesters in violation of lockdown rules and police officers stopping cars to question drivers.
  • Former Prime Minister Tony Blair said the UK needs to drastically speed up its Covid vaccination program to lift lockdown rules in the spring and said it was "not complicated" to ramp up the program.
  • Matt Hancock said the teachers have a "very strong argument" about getting the coronavirus vaccine next, as the health secretary said MPs ministers are currently considering the rest of the order of priority.
  • A general practitioner on the front lines of the UK coronavirus vaccine push revealed doctors still haven't received doses that should have arrived last month for fear Boris Johnson over-promised his promise.
  • The European Medicines Agency has approved Moderna's Covid vaccine and will start receiving supplies from next week thanks to a contract signed last summer. The UK will miss this though and won't get it until the spring.
  • The World Health Organization refused to bless the UK's controversial plan to cut Pfizer's two doses of coronavirus vaccine by more than a month.
  • Boris Johnson has been accused of leaving a "significant void in the nation's defense" against coronavirus by delaying rules for people who need a negative test before entering the UK.
  • Gavin Williamson came under pressure to explain how teachers can accurately grade GCSEs and A-Levels for students after the 2021 exams were canceled due to Covid.
  • Politicians and experts have beaten China for refusing entry to members of a World Health Organization (WHO) team to investigate the causes of the coronavirus pandemic.
  • Doctors may have to "lottery" decide which seriously ill patients to treat if the NHS is overwhelmed by draft Covid rationing plans this winter.
  • The organizer of Clap for Carers is calling for a return to the weekly round of applause during England's third national suspension – from 8pm tomorrow.

Mr Diwakar noted that the "best" case forecast would mean the number of Covid patients in G&A beds would rise to 9,500 by Jan 19, with non-Covid patients remaining the same at 7,460 – a number that remains constant in all scenarios.

After small measures to control demand, a total demand of 17,100 is forecast.

Possible ways to increase capacity include securing an additional 400 beds through the NHS, with the independent sector finding 50.

In addition, 1,000 “step beds,” some of which were provided when Nightingale Hospital opened, and 150 beds provided by professional societies would add up to a total of 15,600 – still 1,500 less than forecast demand.

In the "average" scenario 2,900 beds would be missing, in the "worse" scenario 4,400.

The intensive or “adult intensive care” model uses the same pattern as that used for G&A beds. The “best” scenario shows that the number of Covid patients rises to 1,600, whereby the “unrestricted total demand” is just over 2,000.

The reduced capacity is estimated at 1,660, with a “deficit” of just over 400 beds in the intensive care unit.

Downing Street is desperate to accelerate its mass vaccination program, which is seen as the only way to escape the never-ending cycle of lockdowns.

The prime minister promised to vaccinate the 13 million most vulnerable Britons by mid-February with the aim of easing restrictions – but today he admitted there would be no "big bang" release from the current national lockdown.

He announced that seven mass coronavirus vaccination centers will open next week to help turbo chargers shock millions of people. The emergency sites are operated by NHS staff and volunteers.

However, politicians fear that his promise was over-promising, as ministers have already tried to shift the blame for disruptions in initial vaccine supplies. Boris Johnson initially said the backlog was due to quality controls put in place by regulators and Matt Hancock trying to attribute difficulties to limited production supply.

Pharmacists have called for their shops to be used to hand out the bumps and asked the NHS to deploy its "invisible army" of volunteers to ensure that up to 3 million are vaccinated each week.

And former Prime Minister Tony Blair released a "blueprint" calling for No10 to put all his weight behind the vaccination program. He insisted on expanding the program, "is not complicated".

The prime minister defended England's third national lockdown, telling a recalled House of Commons that his hand had been forced after a new variant of the disease was found to spread with "terrifying ease".

Mr Johnson said No10's mass vaccination program means that almost a quarter of people over 80 have already received shocks and that England has vaccinated more people "than the rest of Europe combined".

Its national shutdown, which includes a strict stay-at-home message and schools closed, is due to be reviewed in mid-February, but the laws on which it is based will not expire until late March.

Mr Johnson has said he hopes the rules can be lifted in the spring, but he hasn't made a firm commitment, fueling Tory's fears that the restrictions could last far beyond the first seven weeks.

Mr Johnson stressed that if the rules were relaxed, there would be a "gradual unpacking" of the lockdown rather than an immediate end as it dashed hopes of a speedy return to normal life.

Senior Tories accused the prime minister of launching an "assault on freedom and livelihood" as they warned that the lockdown would inevitably lead to some people "breaking".

Mr Hancock turned down the request to provide a firm endpoint for the lockdown, suggesting the curbs may have to remain even if the vaccine rollout comes by mid-February if deaths don't go down.

The Minister of Health came under fire from his own side when he launched the debate on the regulations underlying the brutal pressure – which is already in place.

Mr Johnson made it clear that a successful implementation of the vaccination program will be critical to when the lockdown measures can be lifted.

He said: “We have already vaccinated more people in this country than in the rest of Europe combined, and we will give the House the greatest possible transparency about our speeding up of these efforts by posting daily updates online starting Monday so that honorary members can go from stitch to stitch bump can challenge the process that is done every day.

Above are the locations of the seven mass vaccination centers that will start operating next week. They were unveiled by the Prime Minister today

Above are the locations of the seven mass vaccination centers that will start operating next week. They were unveiled by the Prime Minister today

“But while we are taking this big step towards finally overcoming the virus and reclaiming our lives, we have to deal with the new variant, which is between 50 and 70 percent more contagious.

& # 39; The steps the House agreed on last month worked on the old variant, but unfortunately, despite the excellent work done by the British public, that mutation has spread with terrifying ease and speed, leading to more cases than we've ever seen numbers before that unfortunately cannot be explained by the meteoric rise in tests. & # 39;

However, fears are growing that the Prime Minister has over-promised with his promise to bump 13 million Britons by mid-February.

The general practitioner who hands out Covid Jab says they had NO doses even though they are "raring to go".

A general practitioner on the front lines of Britain's major coronavirus vaccination surge has revealed doctors still haven't received doses that should have arrived last month for fear Boris Johnson has come up with his promise to bump 13 million Britons and lock down by March to finish, promised too much.

Dr. Rosemary Leonard, an NHS family doctor who works in south London, said her practices were "raring to go" and had been waiting for her first vaccinations since December 28th.

However, she claimed the delivery date had already been postponed three times and that the first doses were not due to arrive until January 15, more than two weeks late.

Dr. Leonard, who also writes a column for the Daily Express, warned of the vaccine being launched as a "zip code lottery for patients" and believes the delay is due to "key supply issues".

Although the Oxford vaccine only took a few days to roll out, there has already been a hint between the government, regulators and the maker of the sting, AstraZeneca, as to who is responsible for the delays.

Matt Hancock and NHS bosses have pointed out that manufacturing was too slow, while the Prime Minister blamed the UK's strict batch testing rules that every vaccine shipment must be quality checked.

Independent pharmacists asked the government to run small chains of vaccinations to help Number 10 deliver on their ambitious vaccination promises, which have to push a mammoth 3 million Britons a week.

MailOnline has spoken to at least half a dozen affiliates who claim 11,000 pharmacies are willing, ready, and able to help get the program started. They say they are being held back by more government bureaucracy.

A general practitioner on the front lines of Britain's major coronavirus vaccination surge announced today that doctors have still not received doses that were supposed to arrive last month.

Dr. Rosemary Leonard, an NHS family doctor who works in south London, said her practices were "raring to go" and had been waiting for her first vaccinations since December 28th.

However, she claimed the delivery date had already been postponed three times and that the first doses were not due to arrive until January 15, more than two weeks late.

Dr. Leonard warned that the vaccine rollout would become a "zip code lottery for patients," believing the delay is the result of "key supply issues".

Although the Oxford vaccine only took a few days to roll out, there has already been a hint between the government, regulators and the maker of the sting, AstraZeneca, as to who is responsible for the delays.

Matt Hancock and NHS bosses have pointed out that manufacturing was too slow, while the Prime Minister blamed the UK's strict batch testing rules that every vaccine shipment must be quality checked.

Independent pharmacists asked the government to run small chains of vaccinations to help Number 10 deliver on their ambitious vaccination promises, which have to push a mammoth 3 million Britons a week.

MailOnline has spoken to at least half a dozen affiliates who claim 11,000 pharmacies are willing, ready, and able to help get the program started. They say they are being held back by more government bureaucracy.

Meanwhile, shocking footage from an intensive care unit has revealed the scale of the coronavirus crisis and the strain on the NHS.

At London's University College Hospital, emotional doctors and nurses struggled while caring for the growing numbers of coronavirus patients.

Operating theaters and some children's rooms have even been converted into intensive care units to cope with the ever growing number of patients. Footage filmed by the BBC showed the alarming reality in hospital wards.

One patient, Attila, 67, spoke about the trauma of suffering from the virus. He said: & # 39; I was blown away. I didn't think I would make it. There is no oxygen around. It's very scary. & # 39;

A doctor went on to explain that if the hospital is forced to continue increasing its capacity at this rate, it can only hold out one more week before it cannot provide intensive health care to all patients.

Main Street has also campaigned for the introduction of the mass vaccination program to get life back to normal by spring.

Bensons for Beds announced today that it has written to the government offering all 250 stores across the UK as temporary vaccination centers. And the owner of London nightclub G-A-Y claimed this morning that he wrote to Westminster Council suggesting its venue.

So far, only 1.3 million people in the UK have been vaccinated with the Oxford / AstraZeneca or Pfizer / BioNTech shocks since the program started a month ago. There is a growing demand these days to dramatically speed up the process – with concerns that local chemists and other facilities are underutilized.

In an attempt to justify the decision to send England into its third national lockdown, Mr Johnson also said the ONS report released yesterday, which shows the extent of infections across the country as well as increasing hospital stays, “is inevitable That the facts are changing and we have to change our answer '.

Dr. Rosemary Leonard, an NHS family doctor who works in south London, said her practices were "raring to go" and had been waiting for her first vaccinations since December 28th.

The UK was the first country to start vaccinating members of the public against Covid-19 and has now shocked more than 1.3 million people. However, it had to unleash a controversial strategy to widen the gaps between doses to protect the elderly from a runaway second wave (Image: Joan Barnes, 88, getting a vaccine while driving through Manchester)

Dr. Rosemary Leonard (left), an NHS family doctor who works in south London, said her practices were "raring to go" and had been waiting for her first vaccinations since December 28th. However, she claimed the delivery date had already been postponed three times, with the first doses not arriving until January 15, more than a fortnight late

At London's University College Hospital, emotional doctors and nurses struggled while caring for the growing numbers of coronavirus patients

At London's University College Hospital, emotional doctors and nurses struggled while caring for the growing numbers of coronavirus patients

Gavin Williamson confirms that the TEACHERS will decide on the GCSE and A-level grades

Teachers will decide on students' GCSE, A-Level and AS-Level grades this summer after exams were canceled due to school closings related to Covid, Education Secretary Gavin Williamson confirmed today.

The exams, which should take place in May and June of this year, will be replaced with school-based assessments, he told the Commons in a statement this afternoon.

The pressured minister ended up facing MPs in chaos over the decision to close schools during the new lockdown.

He said MPs schools will be required to produce between three and five hours of online classes per day while they are closed for up to three months.

He told MPs that "our schools have not suddenly become unsafe" and that they are "much better prepared than last March" to implement home learning.

He said: “We have set clear, legally binding requirements for schools to provide high quality distance learning. This is mandatory for all government funded schools and is enforced by Ofsted.

“We expect schools to offer between three and five hours of lessons per day, depending on the age of the child. If parents feel that their child's school does not provide appropriate distance education, they should raise their concerns with the teacher or headmaster first, otherwise report the matter to Ofsted. & # 39;

He added, "I'm not going to apologize for being excited about making sure we were able to conduct audits – but we are realizing where we are as a result of this pandemic, we need to change course and therefore let's take the way we are. & # 39;

He said the details of how the teachers' assessments would work would be "fine-tuned" with Ofsted, examination boards and teaching unions.

He told MPs: “So we had no choice but to go back to a national lockdown in England, with similar measures being taken by the decentralized administrations to allow us to control this new variant until we got the most likely victims with vaccines out of the way can vacate. & # 39;

When Mr Johnson announced the lockdown Monday night, he said the measures would be reviewed in mid-February.

However, the provisions that MEPs are voting on this afternoon should apply until the end of March.

Mr Johnson tried to allay Tory fears that the April measures might still be in place, but also insisted that the nation "must be extremely cautious about the upcoming timetable".

He said, “Like last spring, our emergence from the lockdown cocoon will not be a big bang but a gradual unpacking.

It is for this reason that the legislation that this House will vote on later today runs until March 31, not because we expect the full national lockdown to continue until then, but for a steady, controlled and evidence-based transition through the levels regional basis, cautiously, stone by stone, so to speak, to free ourselves from our imprisonment, but without risking the hard-won profits that our protection has brought us. & # 39;

Mr Johnson said schools will be "the very first things to reopen" if lockdown measures can be eased.

Sir Keir Starmer said Labor would back the new lockdown as he warned Britain was facing "perhaps the darkest moment of the pandemic".

But he said the situation was not the result of "bad luck" and "following a pattern" when he accused the government of ignoring expert warnings and repetitively failing to act quickly enough.

"In the first wave of the pandemic, the government was repeatedly too slow to act and we ended 2020 with one of the biggest deaths in Europe and the hardest-hit economies of the major economies," he said.

In early summer, a government report titled "Preparing for a Challenging Winter" warned of the risk of a second wave, mutation of the virus and overwhelming NHS.

I presented this report to the Prime Minister at the PMQs in July.

& # 39; Track and trace didn't work all autumn. Sage advised a break in September, but the prime minister delayed weeks before acting.

“We had a tiered system that didn't work, and then we had the debacle of the belated decision to change the rules of mixing for Christmas.

“The final piece of advice on the situation we are in now was given on December 22nd, but no action has been taken for two weeks until Monday of this week.

"These are the choices that have brought us to where we are now – and the vaccine is the only way out now and we must all support national efforts to get it in place as soon as possible."

Anger is growing on the back seats of the Tory over the government's handling of the pandemic.

Boris Johnson targeted for delayed border test plan

Boris Johnson was under pressure today to clarify plans that people should receive a negative Covid test result before entering the UK.

Ministers have indicated that such a requirement is to block the influx of new variants of the coronavirus after a South African strain was found in the UK.

Full details have not yet been released, however, and the Prime Minister has come under fire in the House of Commons today as to when they will be brought in and how much will be announced.

New numbers from Labor showed that only three in 100 people arriving in the UK are screened to see if they meet quarantine requirements.

Shadow Home Secretary Nick Thomas-Symonds has written to Priti Patel calling for "an urgent review and improvement plan for quarantine arrangements."

He claimed that the current system of screening only a fraction of people leaves the UK "defenseless and completely exposed to imports of coronavirus variants".

Union leader Sir Keir Starmer targeted the Prime Minister in the House of Commons today as politicians returned to vote on the new lockdown rules.

& # 39; The Prime Minister knows that there are serious concerns about the rapid transmission of this disease. New strains are being discovered in South Africa, Denmark and elsewhere. The quarantine system isn't working, ”said Sir Keir.

The Prime Minister said yesterday that we will introduce additional measures at the border. I have to ask why these measures have not already been put in place. They were informed through the media for days, but nothing happened. & # 39;

Mr Johnson did not reveal any details and only made a mild statement: "I think it is important that we protect our borders and protect this country from the virus readmission from overseas and that is why we have taken tough action on South Africa When the new variant became clear there, and we will continue to take all necessary measures to protect this country from the readmission of the virus. & # 39;

Some high-ranking Conservative MPs had joined the opposition and called for another national ban.

However, the idea of ​​tightening restrictions sparked anger among other Conservatives, who insisted that the country's experience with the pandemic shows lockdowns are not working and crippling the economy.

Tory MP Mark Harper, chairman of the Covid Recovery Group (CRG) of lockdown skeptics, has called for a "substantial relaxation" of restrictions once the four top priority groups have been vaccinated.

In the Telegraph he wrote: “Achieving this vital goal must now become the central, overarching focus of government.

"We need to see daily vaccination reports that are updated by MPs and the public to make sure we are making the progress we need."

He added, "Once these groups are vaccinated and become immune to the disease, this should be a clear threshold for when any major relaxation of restrictions can begin."

Tory colleague and CRG colleague Steve Baker later tweeted agreeing with Mr. Harper, adding, "Once the most vulnerable people have been vaccinated, draconian restrictions must essentially be removed."

Many Conservative MPs are urging the government to explain the exact circumstances under which the lockdown will be lifted.

Former Tory Minister Jeremy Wright told Mr Johnson in the House of Commons that the government needs to be "more definitive" on when the curbs can be eased.

An angry Sir Desmond Swayne broke the restrictions and said to Mr Johnson: “Pubs cannot compete with supermarkets for off-sales, even in a household you cannot play tennis or golf.

"Why, in spite of the attack on freedom and livelihood, are these regulations permeated with a pettifogging malice?"

Mr Johnson replied, & # 39; Pettifogging, yes, vicious, no. I'm going to have to take the hit here to stop the virus, protect the NHS and save lives.

"To do this, we need to limit transmission between people."

Sir Graham Brady, chairman of the influential 1922 Tory Backbenchers committee, said "many" MPs were concerned about approving a lockdown that could last until the end of March.

In the House of Commons, he said: "I welcome the Prime Minister's assurance that this House will be consulted on lifting restrictions if this is possible before the end of March, but can I tell him that many of us are concerned about being asked to approve a lockdown that could last until March 31st.

"Kann ich (Herrn Johnson) bitten, das Haus Ende Januar und Ende Februar zu überdenken und ihm eine Abstimmung anzubieten, nicht darüber, ob Beschränkungen aufgehoben werden sollen, sondern ob sie fortgesetzt werden sollen oder nicht?"

Die 25 Prozent der durch Covid-19 verursachten Todesfälle (siehe Grafik rechts) sind der bisher höchste Anteil während der zweiten Welle, und dies bedeutet, dass die Gesamtzahl der Menschen, die in dieser Woche gestorben sind, signifikant höher ist als zur gleichen Zeit in den Vorjahren (Grafik links)

Die 25 Prozent der durch Covid-19 verursachten Todesfälle (siehe Grafik rechts) sind der bisher höchste Anteil während der zweiten Welle, und dies bedeutet, dass die Gesamtzahl der Menschen, die in dieser Woche gestorben sind, signifikant höher ist als zur gleichen Zeit in den Vorjahren (Grafik links)

NHS-Statistiken zeigen, dass Menschen unter 40 Jahren selten an Covid-19 sterben, mit 100 der 17.572 Todesfälle im November und Dezember in dieser Altersgruppe

NHS-Statistiken zeigen, dass Menschen unter 40 Jahren selten an Covid-19 sterben, mit 100 der 17.572 Todesfälle im November und Dezember in dieser Altersgruppe

Laut Tony Blair muss Großbritannien das Covid-Impfprogramm beschleunigen

Der frühere Premierminister Tony Blair sagte heute, Großbritannien müsse sein Impfprogramm gegen Coronaviren drastisch beschleunigen, um die Sperrregeln im Frühjahr aufzuheben.

Blair behauptete, es sei heute Morgen im Live-Fernsehen "nicht kompliziert", als er eine "Blaupause" zur Verbesserung der Impfstoffeinführung des Landes herausbrachte, und schlug vor, die Beschränkungen im Februar "erheblich" zu lockern, wenn der NHS auf jeweils Millionen von Stößen skaliert Woche.

Da in den kommenden Wochen Vorräte ins Land fließen, sollten die Beamten jede Sehne belasten, um sicherzustellen, dass jede Dosis so schnell wie möglich verwendet wird. Er sagte, es sollte Pop-up-Impfzentren und mobile geben, dass Apotheken benutzt und Freiwillige massenhaft rekrutiert werden sollten.

Wahllokale, Pubs und Büros sollten als Hubs genutzt werden, und die Versorgung könnte bis Ende Februar bis zu drei Millionen Dosen pro Woche liefern, teilte das Tony Blair Institute for Global Change in einem Bericht mit.

Bis Ende Februar behauptet das Institut, dass die Hälfte der Bevölkerung die erste Dosis eines Impfstoffs erhalten haben könnte, um sie vor Covid-19 zu schützen. Großbritannien hat sich nur verpflichtet, bis Mitte nächsten Monats 13 Millionen der am stärksten gefährdeten Einwohner zu impfen.

Herr Blair hat sich in die Impfpolitik eingemischt, nachdem er als erster öffentlich vorgeschlagen hatte, die Stöße zunächst auf eine Dosis zu beschränken und sie weiter auszudehnen, um zu vermeiden, dass die Versorgung zurückgehalten wird, um sicherzustellen, dass die Menschen eine zweite erhalten. Dies ist seitdem die offizielle Politik der Einführung der Regierung.

Herr Johnson antwortete: "Ich kann nicht glauben, dass das Haus bis Ende März warten muss, bevor es eine neue Abstimmung und eine neue Diskussion über die Maßnahmen erhält, die wir ergreifen müssen."

Der konservative ehemalige Minister Sir Edward Leigh sagte, dass viele seiner Kollegen, die für die Regeln "aus Loyalität oder weil wir die Autorität der Regierung bewahren wollen" stimmen werden, "besorgt" sind, dass aufeinanderfolgende Sperren "immer weniger effektiv" sind.

In der Zwischenzeit steht Herr Johnson vor einer Spaltung des Kabinetts wegen seiner Entscheidung, Schulen in ganz England zu schließen.

Der Premierminister war zunächst auf der Seite der Falken, angeführt von Bildungsminister Gavin Williamson, der wollte, dass der Unterricht offen bleibt.

Aber er wechselte zu Tauben, darunter Gesundheitsminister Matt Hancock und Michel Gove, der Minister des Kabinetts, nachdem ihm neue Daten vorgelegt worden waren, die das Ausmaß des Problems der Nation zeigten, berichtete die Financial Times.

Die Erklärung von Herrn Johnson gegenüber den Abgeordneten kam, nachdem der Zar der Regierung für Impfstoffe heute zugegeben hatte, dass der NHS bis Februar etwa drei Millionen Impfstoffdosen pro Woche verabreichen muss, um das Ziel des Premierministers zu erreichen.

Nadhim Zahawi sagte, das Ziel, innerhalb von sieben Wochen mehr als 13 Millionen der am stärksten gefährdeten Menschen abzudecken, sei "sehr dehnbar" – könne aber erreicht werden.

Es gibt heute eine wachsende Nachfrage nach einer Beschleunigung des Impfprozesses – mit der Sorge, dass lokale Chemiker und andere Einrichtungen nicht ausreichend genutzt werden.

Bisher wurden in Großbritannien rund 1,3 Millionen Menschen mit den Stößen Oxford / AstraZeneca oder Pfizer / BioNTech geimpft, und Herr Zahawi sagte, dass es in den kommenden Tagen zu einer „massiven Beschleunigung“ kommen wird.

Als Zahawi herausgefordert wurde, dass die wöchentliche Zahl mehr als drei Millionen als zwei Millionen betragen müsste, um das Ziel des Premierministers zu erreichen, nickte er und sagte: „Sie werden diesen Anstieg sehen – der NHS hat einen sehr klaren Plan.

„Wir haben ein fantastisches Team, das sieben Tage die Woche rund um die Uhr arbeitet, um dies zu erreichen.

'Kein Zweifel, es ist ein streckendes Ziel. Aber ich denke, es ist eines, auf das wir unbedingt achten sollten. & # 39;

(tagsToTranslate) Dailymail (t) Nachrichten (t) NHS Nightingale Hospitals (t) NHS (t) Coronavirus