ENTERTAINMENT

Lockdown becomes LAW: Boris Johnson will run against MPs before the vote


Police have arrested anti-lockdown protesters and supporters of Julian Assange for breaking lockdown rules in central London this afternoon when an overzealous official opened the leaflet outside a Berkshire Tesco asking shoppers, "Why are you here today? "

The crackdown on those leaving the house came when Boris Johnson was accused of tacitly extending his lockdown until March 31, when his new COVID bill was released, and he Tory's calls for the "malicious" Rules withdrew after its first review on February 15.

The council's Covid guards were also in effect across the country, including Leeds, when authorities promised to spot mask defects to groups of more than two people or those who were there for no “good reason” punish. The West Midlands Police have requested permission to force entry into homes to separate parties.

Scotland Yard police officers were filmed today chasing protesters across Parliament Square before being handcuffed when officials said they had gathered illegally: "I will fine you if you do not return home. " People were pinned to the ground and placed in vans after refusing to leave.

Met Officers have also been photographed arresting supporters of Julian Assange who was denied bail on Westminster Magistrates' Court this morning, including a 92-year-old man. The protesters shouted "fascists" at the police who took them away – and the Met has not yet revealed what the offense is. A witness told MailOnline officials on site that it was a violation of the Covid rules.

The Metropolitan Police's hard line came as England's new lockdown laws were published, and it was announced that they would be enforced by Easter March 31st – not mid-February as Boris Johnson had promised if the vaccine rollout is successful.

Thames Valley Police Department has apologized for the behavior of an officer who "was a little bit keen" to hand out leaflets and ask drivers, "Why are you here?" as part of a crackdown on travel during lockdown in affluent Maidenhead.

Scotland Yard says anyone attending unlicensed musical events or large illegal parties will now also be fined – not just the organizers of such events – and anyone who "wears masks where they should be for no good reason to be fined – not ".

Meanwhile, West Midlands Police and Crime Commissioner David Jamieson has urged the government to allow officials to "more easily enforce" the new rules if there is an illegal party.

Fixed charges of £ 200 will be issued for each first offense. This doubling applies to further offenses up to a maximum of £ 6,400. Those who hold or are involved in an illegal gathering of more than 30 people risk being fined £ 10,000 by the police.

Scotland Yard has advised its officials and PCSOs to be "more curious" in policing the streets and "issued updated instructions … to speed up fines for anyone who commits obvious, willful and serious offenses".

The troop's persistent dictation came hours after officials and police unions said it was "impossible" to punish anyone caught leaving their homes for lying to them by the public, and the Met has already knocked 1,300 officers down for illness and self-isolation .

The prime minister told the Commons ahead of a vote on the measure tonight that he had "no choice" but to take action against those breaking the rules in an attempt to curb the spread of the mutant strain of Covid that is sweeping the country .

He said: "We have no choice but to go back to a national lockdown in England where similar measures will be passed by the decentralized administrations so we can control this new variant until we can get the most likely victims out of the way with vaccines . "

Tory MPs are alarmed that regulations have extended the Tiers system's expiration date from February 22nd to March 31st – although the Prime Minister claims the system can be relaxed from mid-February if the vaccine roll-out goes well .

When the police promised to toughen up to stop the spread of Covid, it also turned out today:

  • Boris Johnson is desperate to win over angry Tory MPs while defending national lockdown and insisting he had no choice but to shut down England.
  • Matt Hancock has been accused of turning down an offer from pharmacists to aid in the largest vaccination drive in history – and it turns out that doses of the vaccine don't go to general practitioners on a Sunday.
  • The World Health Organization refuses to support Britain's move into space. Pfizer Covid vaccine doses are supported for 12 weeks as there is no evidence that this will work
  • More chaos in education as BTEC students remain pending exams starting today as the A-Level and GCSE tests are permanently canceled.

Police officers arrest a 92-year-old man outside Westminster Magistrates' Court in London today after WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange was denied bail. The Met has yet to confirm the reason for the arrests as it has pledged to crack down on Covidiots, including those who gather in large groups

This woman screamed as she was taken away after repeated warnings from officials to evacuate the area outside Westminster Magistrates' Court

This woman screamed as she was taken away after repeated warnings from officials to evacuate the area outside Westminster Magistrates' Court

Five officers, several of whom were armed with batons, broke off the protest in front of the parliament buildings and pushed the man to the ground

Five officers, several of whom were armed with batons, broke off the protest in front of the parliament buildings and pushed the man to the ground

Police were forced to chase protesters around Parliament Square after many refused to disperse this afternoon

Police were forced to chase protesters around Parliament Square after many refused to disperse this afternoon

Police officers hold a protester in Parliament Square during an anti-lockdown protest violating Covid lockdown rules

Police officers hold a protester in Parliament Square during an anti-lockdown protest violating Covid lockdown rules

This woman was searched and then taken away when the Met said it wouldn't be difficult for anyone outside without a "good excuse".

This woman was searched and then taken away when the Met said it wouldn't be difficult for anyone outside without a "good excuse".

This man was led away when his fellow "fascists" were calling for officials sent to break off the protest in Parliament Square when new lockdown rules became law

This man was led away when his fellow "fascists" were calling for officials sent to break off the protest in Parliament Square when new lockdown rules became law

These protesters shouted as they were surrounded and arrested after officials asked them to leave the Parliament Square area

One was pinned to the pedestal under the statue of Mahatma Gandhi

These protesters shouted as they were surrounded and arrested after officials asked them to leave the Parliament Square area. One was pinned to the pedestal under the statue of Mahatma Gandhi

Thames Valley Police have apologized for the behavior of an officer who "was a little keen" in distributing leaflets in Maidenhead asking drivers, "Why are you here today?"

Thames Valley Police have apologized for the behavior of an officer who "was a little keen" in distributing leaflets in Maidenhead asking drivers, "Why are you here today?"

Boris Johnson, speaking in the House of Commons today, went into law this morning to ensure people cannot leave the house without a "reasonable apology" or face fines of £ 200 down

Boris Johnson, speaking in the House of Commons today, went into law this morning to ensure people cannot leave the house without a "reasonable apology" or face fines of £ 200 down

The regulations underlying the drastic curbs came into force in England after the Prime Minister said he had no choice because the mutated strain was widespread

The new law removes a number of exemptions from the old Tier 4 rules, for example for outdoor sports and zoos, and applies the strict rules to the whole of England

The regulations underlying the drastic curbs came into force in England after the Prime Minister said he had no choice because the mutated strain was widespread

What is a "reasonable excuse" for leaving the house?

You are not allowed to leave your home or be outside of it unless you have a "reasonable excuse". This is regulated by law. The police can take action against you if you leave the house without a “reasonable apology” and impose a fine (Fixed Penalty).

You can get a fixed fine of £ 200 for the first offense, which doubles to a maximum of £ 6,400 for further offenses.

A "reasonable apology" includes:

  • Work – You can only leave home for work if it is inappropriate for you to do your work from home
  • Volunteering – You can also leave home to do volunteer or community service
  • Essential Activities – You can leave home to buy things in stores or get services. You can also leave home to do these things on behalf of a disabled or vulnerable person, or someone who is self-isolating
  • Education and Childcare – You can only leave home for education, registered childcare, and supervised activities for children that you are eligible to attend.
  • Meeting with Others and Care – You can leave home to visit people in your support bubble (if you are legally entitled to form one), to informally care for children under the age of 14 under a child care bubble (e.g. to Parents to work) in order to look after disabled or vulnerable people
  • Exercise – You can continue to exercise alone, with someone else, or with your household or support bladder, limited to once a day and not outside of your area
  • Medical Reasons – You can leave home for medical reasons, including a COVID-19 test for medical appointments and emergencies
  • Harm and Compassionate Visits – You can leave the house to be with someone who is giving birth, to avoid injury or illness, or to avoid the risk of harm (such as domestic violence).
  • You can also leave the house to visit someone who is dying, someone in a nursing home (if this is permitted under the guidance of the nursing home), a hospice or hospital, or to accompany them to a doctor's appointment
  • Animal welfare reasons – You can leave the house for animal welfare reasons, e.g. B. to consult or treat a veterinarian
  • Communal Worship and Life Events – You can leave home to attend or attend a place of worship for communal worship, funeral or event related to a death, burial site or memorial garden, or to attend a wedding ceremony.

There are other reasonable excuses. For example, you may leave your home to comply with legal obligations or to engage in activities related to buying, selling, renting or renting a residential property, or when it is reasonable to vote in an election or referendum.

The police in charge have apologized for the behavior of an officer who "was a little keen" to hand out leaflets and ask the drivers, "Why are you here?" as part of a crackdown on travel while in lockdown.

Residents of upscale Maidenhead, Berks., Were outraged that their uniformed cops who distributed the leaflets were questioning their shopping and exercise trips.

The leaflet says: “Due to government restrictions, we must avoid ALL UNNECESSARY TRAVEL.

“You shouldn't exercise more than once a day. This should be done by walking, running or cycling etc. from your home address. You shouldn't be driving to a location outside of your home to do this.

"Please refrain from unnecessary travel until restrictions have been lifted."

However, Thames Valley Police chiefs said the leaflets should not be distributed by officials stopping all traffic on a bridge in the area.

Rosalind Bieber, who shared a picture of one of the leaflets online, said, “I was trapped in a large line from the police station roundabout to the Berkeley site at 9:30 this morning.

“Two police officers stopped every single car and asked where we were going. I was given this booklet as shown below and was told I cannot shop at Tesco in Taplow as I live in Maidenhead. They're going to be fined starting tomorrow so be aware folks. & # 39;

Ms. Bieber added, “If Tesco is my regular grocery store, why should I be asked to go to another supermarket?

“I'm traveling two miles from one SL6 zip code to another SL6 zip code. I don't like Sainsbury's so I won't go there. Not my fault Tesco is two miles away, the one in Maidenhead that closed three months ago! Instead, the police should take action against those who travel on non-essential trips! & # 39;

More than 100 mourners who attended the funeral of a friend who had died of Covid-19 were sent home by police from a cemetery for violating coronavirus gathering rules.

The mourners arrived at the crematorium and cemetery in Slough, Berks, to pay their final respects to someone buried during a funeral after dying from the pandemic virus.

The officers had to send the grieving people away and point out that the regulations did not allow more than 30 people to gather for funerals. The Slough Crematorium was the site of Princess Margaret's funeral many years ago.

A Slough Borough Council spokesman said: “We are warning residents that if lockdown rules are violated after an incident occurs today, police will be called to the cemetery and crematorium.

Police were called to Stoke Road premises, owned and operated by the council, after more than 100 people appeared for a funeral. This clearly violated the blocking regulations, according to which only 30 people must be present and socially distant.

"It is the first time since the beginning of the crisis that the police have been called to the cemetery for violating the Covid regulations."

Boris Johnson's new legislation means that unless the public has a “reasonable excuse,” the public must stay home, travel for critical work and daily exercise, and cannot meet with more than one person outside their household, when the tedious new third lock begins.

The regulations underlying the drastic lockdown curbs came into effect in England after the Prime Minister said he had no choice due to the rampant mutant tribe.

A bearded man in a hat, tracksuit and Batman scarf is handcuffed during an anti-lockdown protest in Parliament Square

A bearded man in a hat, tracksuit and Batman scarf is handcuffed during an anti-lockdown protest in Parliament Square

Julian Assange supporters were also removed after police ignored repeated warnings not to assemble

Julian Assange supporters were also removed after police ignored repeated warnings not to assemble

Julian Assange supporters were also removed after police ignored repeated warnings not to assemble

The Met had also said it would act if there was a protest in Parliament Square and properly dispatched officials to break it up

The Met had also said it would act if there was a protest in Parliament Square and properly dispatched officials to break it up

Fixed charges of £ 200 are issued for a first offense, which doubles to a maximum of £ 6,400 for subsequent offenses. Those who hold or are involved in an illegal gathering of more than 30 people risk being fined £ 10,000 by the police.

Deputy Assistant Commissioner Matt Twist, Head of the Met's Covid Response, said: "After ten months of this pandemic, the number of people who are genuinely unaware of the restrictions and the reasons they exist is vanishingly small.

“We know the vast majority of Londoners will do the right thing by staying home, wearing masks and not congregating, but a small minority continue to ignore the rules that have been put in place to protect the NHS and save lives.

“Our first duty as police officers is to save lives. The critical situation our NHS peers are facing and the way the new variant virus is moving through communities means we can no longer spend our time explaining or encouraging people to make rules if they violate them intentionally and dangerously. & # 39;

The whole country has essentially been plunged into a tightened version of Tier 4, with a ban on leaving the home unless there is a specific "substantial" reason. The law states that police and PCSOs can break up outdoor gatherings and police officers use "reasonable force" when necessary.

Local authorities also retain the power to control public gatherings and certain premises in their territories until July 17th, rather than January 17th as before.

The Commons was called back from its Christmas break today for the second time to debate and retrospectively vote on the measures announced by the Prime Minister on Monday. However, there is no prospect of defeat for the law as Labor has announced it will back it up and few Tories will rebel with the rise in coronavirus cases.

Scotland Yard said today it will stick to its policy of engaging, explaining and encouraging prior to enforcement.

But it said the public in London – where up to one in 30 people are infected – can expect officials "to be more curious about why they see them en route" and "move on to enforcement faster" if there aren't "lawful" reason.

Police have warned that it will be "impossible" to punish anyone caught leaving their homes without a "reasonable excuse" as the Met has already lost 1,300 officers to illness and self-isolation.

With the current restrictions, people can only leave the house for a few reasons, such as: B. when they buy food or medication and exercise once a day. It does not include socializing or traveling to a second home in another part of the country.

But the police say they have an "impossible task" of exterminating all perpetrators as many will only lie about what they are doing. A police source said, "People will try to find loopholes in the regulations and some will succeed."

It comes, as the World Health Organization said, would not recommend withholding the second dose of the vaccine for up to 12 weeks rather than suggesting that the interval should be between three and four weeks.

In the meantime, Education Secretary Gavin Williamson will outline a package to support young people after students in England were told that this year's GCSE and A-level exams would be canceled.

A person in a mobility scooter passes a sign saying "Thank You NHS Staff" by the sea on Bournemouth Beach in Dorset

A person in a mobility scooter passes a sign saying "Thank You NHS Staff" by the sea on Bournemouth Beach in Dorset

People wearing face masks or covering due to the COVID-19 pandemic sit and talk on a bench in York. The rules say that until April only two people from different households can meet

People wearing face masks or covering due to the COVID-19 pandemic sit and talk on a bench in York. The rules say that until April only two people from different households can meet

A man walks down a deserted Sherlock Street in Birmingham city center during new national lockdowns

A man walks down a deserted Sherlock Street in Birmingham city center during new national lockdowns

Empty streets in Leeds, West Yorkshiure, on the second day of the national lockdown

Empty streets in Leeds, West Yorkshiure, on the second day of the national lockdown

The tube was largely deserted this morning in central London as well, as millions were ordered to stay home

The tube was largely deserted this morning in central London as well, as millions were ordered to stay home

A couple trudge through the snow at Biggin Hill Kent this morning as people enjoy their daily exercise

A couple trudge through the snow at Biggin Hill Kent this morning as people enjoy their daily exercise

Regulations to enforce a national lockdown in England went into effect at 12:01 a.m. on Wednesday as new figures indicated that one in 50 people suffered from coronavirus last week.

Data from the Office of National Statistics suggests that 1.1 million people in private households in England had Covid-19 between December 27 and January 2.

UK chief medical officer Professor Chris Whitty said people should take the rules of being at home seriously when he warned the country was facing a "really serious emergency".

His comments came when the number of daily confirmed cases of coronavirus in the UK topped 60,000 for the first time, while another 830 people died within 28 days of testing positive for Covid-19 on Tuesday.

However, in a sign of progress, the Prime Minister said that more than 1.3 million people across the UK have been vaccinated against the virus to date, including 23% of all England over 80s.

Police State of Great Britain: The detective inspector calls for a change in the law so that officers can force people to enter homes suspected of violating the rules

West Midlands Police and Crime Commissioner David Jamieson said he had urged the government to permit officials to "make it easier to enforce" the new rules.

West Midlands Police and Crime Commissioner David Jamieson said he had urged the government to permit officials to "make it easier to enforce" the new rules.

A police force would like the authorities to force access to the homes of alleged violations of the Covid rules.

West Midlands Police and Crime Commissioner David Jamieson has called on the government to authorize officials to "help enforce the new rules".

Mr Jamieson said: “For the small minority of people who refuse entry to police officers and who hinder their work, entry appears to be a useful tool.

"I have already raised this issue with the police minister, and clarity about the entry permit would help police officers to more easily enforce the new Covid regulations."

Before Christmas, Mr Jamieson said officials would cancel family celebrations if they breached lockdown rules during the holiday season. The police chief also warned of Hanukkah and Diwali celebrations.

But his troubled troops came under fire earlier this week Advertise a new Director of "Fairness and Belonging" worth £ 74,000 a year to "oversee an improved inclusive culture throughout the workplace".

Prof. Whitty said at a press conference on Tuesday evening on Downing Street with Mr Johnson that the vaccination schedule was "realistic but not easy" and that the NHS had to use "multiple channels" to get it out.

Questions were raised during the rollout, however, and a pharmacy manager asked why the NHS "crawled around" for vaccines when its industry offered help.

Simon Dukes, chairman of the Pharmaceutical Negotiating Services Committee, told The Telegraph, “Instead of looking around to find retired general practitioners and nurses and anyone who may have skills, you have an army of thousands of pharmacists up and down the country, each one Winter administered the flu shot.

“We told the NHS that we were ready, ready and desperate to help. But we were actually met by a silence. & # 39;

Meanwhile, The Times reported that two million doses of the Pfizer vaccines held back for boosters would be distributed over the next 14 days.

Police chiefs have warned that enforcing the third national lockdown will add to the burden on officers, who have already increased in number due to the pandemic.

Ken Marsh, chairman of the Metropolitan Police Federation, said tight restrictions will "put a lot of pressure" on police officers in London.

Mr Marsh announced that around 1,300 Scotland Yard officers in the capital were ill or self-isolating.

Meanwhile, John Apter, chairman of the Police Federation of England and Wales, said some armed forces in England had deployed up to 15 percent of the staff.

When asked how enforcing bans would affect officers, Mr. Marsh said, “There is obviously going to be a lot of pressure on us as we have a lot more officers free this time than we did in March.

& # 39; Our numbers have skyrocketed in terms of officers with covid and isolating officers and we expect that to get worse.

"So the pressure is on my colleagues who are still out there to maintain the level they were before."

On Monday evening, Boris Johnson announced a seven-week lockdown to contain the surge in coronavirus triggered by a highly transmissible new variant of the disease.

A deserted Regent Street in London yesterday when millions more worked from home and schools were closed for seven weeks

A deserted Regent Street in London yesterday when millions more worked from home and schools were closed for seven weeks

Police officers chat with members of the public on patrol in the Barton Hill area

Police officers chat with members of the public on patrol in the Barton Hill area

Eine feine Gruppe von 11 Wanderern, die gegen die Covid-Regeln verstießen, um mehr als 150 Meilen von London nach Peak District zu fahren, nachdem einer von ihnen sein Auto verunglückt hatte

Eine Gruppe von 11 Wanderern, die mehr als 150 Meilen von London in den Peak District gefahren sind, wurde wegen Verstoßes gegen die Coronavirus-Regeln bestraft, nachdem einer von ihnen sein Auto verunglückt hatte. Im Bild: Das Auto

Eine Gruppe von 11 Wanderern, die mehr als 150 Meilen von London in den Peak District gefahren sind, wurde wegen Verstoßes gegen die Coronavirus-Regeln bestraft, nachdem einer von ihnen sein Auto verunglückt hatte. Im Bild: Das Auto

Eine Gruppe von 11 Wanderern, die mehr als 150 Meilen von London in den Peak District gefahren sind, wurde wegen Verstoßes gegen die Coronavirus-Regeln bestraft, nachdem einer von ihnen sein Auto verunglückt hatte.

Die Männer waren am Montag in drei Fahrzeugen aus Harrow im Norden Londons angereist, bevor Boris Johnson eine dritte landesweite Sperrung für England ankündigte, die heute in Kraft trat.

Sie wurden von der Polizei in der Nähe von Bamford, Derbyshire, bei Verstößen gegen die Covid-19-Gesetze erwischt, nachdem ein Fahrer nach einem Tag auf dem Land sein Auto auf der A6013 umgedreht hatte.

Den Männern, die sich auf die dreistündige Heimreise begaben, wurden jeweils 200 Pfund Strafe für Reisen zwischen Tier-4-Gebieten ausgehändigt.

Die Polizei von Derbyshire beschlagnahmte auch eines der drei Fahrzeuge, weil es nicht versichert war, und schickte seinen Besitzer in einem Zug nach Hause.

Zu dieser Zeit unterlag London den höchsten Tier-4-Beschränkungen Englands, die es den Menschen verboten hatten, nicht wesentliche Reisen aus der Stadt zu unternehmen.

England wird von einem abgestuften System von Beschränkungen zurückkehren, bei dem das Land unterschiedliche Maßnahmen ergriffen hat.

Herr Apter warnte davor, dass pauschale Beschränkungen klar zu erfassen seien, was bedeutet, dass Beamte gegenüber Nachgiebigen weniger nachsichtig wären.

"Die Menschen sollten damit rechnen, dass mehr Durchsetzung als Folge davon zu sehen ist, denn diesmal gibt es wirklich keine Entschuldigung dafür, die Regeln nicht zu kennen", sagte er.

Er fügte hinzu: „Die Mehrheit der Öffentlichkeit wird das tun, was von ihnen erwartet wird, aber ich denke, es gibt ein echtes Problem in Bezug auf Viren- und Lockdown-Müdigkeit.

"Es gibt eine echte Frustration und die Polizei geht oft mit dem scharfen Ende davon um, da die Leute wütend sind, wenn sie herausgefordert werden."

Diejenigen, die eine illegale Versammlung von mehr als 30 Personen abhalten oder daran beteiligt sind, riskieren eine von der Polizei verhängte Geldstrafe von £ 10.000.

Der Premierminister beendete seine düstere Fernsehansprache mit einem Hoffnungsschimmer und läutete den "größten Impf-Rollout in unserer Geschichte" ein.

Die Minister hoffen, dass bis Mitte Februar alle Bewohner von Pflegeheimen, extrem schutzbedürftige, über 75-Jährige und Gesundheitspersonal an vorderster Front, den Stich erhalten haben.

Die Polizei fordert auch Beamte auf, den Impfstoff zu bekommen.

Herr Marsh behauptete: „Es scheint, dass die Polizeiarbeit aus jedem Gespräch über den Schutz meiner Kollegen herausgeholt wurde, was ich ziemlich unglaublich finde, wenn man bedenkt, dass sie an vorderster Front stehen.

“You're the one group of people other than the National Health Service who actually go to work and have to be with the public 24 hours a day, every day.

"It's just amazing that the police didn't even consider vaccinating."

Herr Apter hat auch gefordert, dass Beamte priorisiert werden, nachdem die am stärksten gefährdeten Gruppen der Gesellschaft und die NHS-Beschäftigten den Stich erhalten haben.

Er schrieb im Daily Telegraph: „Ohne den Impfstoff besteht die reale Gefahr, dass sich mehr Beamte mit dem Virus infizieren.

“As more and more people isolate themselves or call in sick with the virus, the police force is starting to struggle to do what the public fully expects of them.

Einige Streitkräfte melden bereits bis zu Prozent ihrer Offiziere als krank oder selbstisolierend. It's getting worse and worse and it's just not sustainable. & # 39;

Mr Apter, whose organization represents 130,000 civil servants, said "the last thing the public wants is to call 999 in their hour of need only to find that we have too few civil servants to answer".

Ein Sprecher des Innenministeriums sagte: „Es ist falsch zu behaupten, dass die Polizei nicht über die Ressourcen verfügt, die sie benötigt. Die Abwesenheitsraten bleiben national niedrig, und wir haben die Polizei während der gesamten Pandemie unterstützt, einschließlich der Bereitstellung von zusätzlichen 30 Millionen Pfund im Oktober für die Durchsetzung der Coronavirus-Vorschriften .

"Die Polizei wird sich weiterhin engagieren, erklären, ermutigen und schließlich durchsetzen, wo dies notwendig ist, um Leben zu retten."

(tagsToTranslate) Dailymail (t) Nachrichten (t) Coronavirus (t) Coronavirus Lockdowns (t) Weihnachten (t) Boris Johnson