ENTERTAINMENT

Life saving treatment for a British woman in Turkey costs £ 10,000 a day


A British mother is fighting for her life after falling ill with a mysterious illness at a Turkish hospital where treatment is said to cost her desperate family £ 10,000 a day.

The British consulate told the family of breast cancer survivor Carole Fleming, 67, that they couldn't help but bring her home while she was alive, said her daughter Stephanie Uyar, 36.

Ms. Uyar is trying to raise £ 25,000 for a commercial ambulance to bring the mother of two, currently in intensive care in Muğla, back to the UK and into the hands of the NHS.

The family pays £ 1,000 a day to treat a blood disorder related to possible bone marrow deficiency. However, the daily cost will rise to £ 10,000 if the doctor changes their course of action.

UK mother Carole Fleming, 67 (pictured in hospital) is fighting for her life after falling ill with a mysterious illness at a Turkish hospital where treatment is said to cost her desperate family £ 10,000 a day.

Ms. Uyar claims medical professionals in Turkey mistakenly believed that her mother's illness was caused by a drug linked to her breast cancer – which made her better last year.

The British consulate told breast cancer survivor Ms. Fleming's family that they couldn't help but bring her home while she was alive, said daughter Stephanie Uyar, 36 (pictured)

The British consulate told breast cancer survivor Ms. Fleming's family that they couldn't help but bring her home while she was alive, said daughter Stephanie Uyar, 36 (pictured)

The link to her previous state meant her health insurer would not cover the cost.

The doctors withdrew when they took Ms. Fleming off the medication and her condition worsened. But the insurer won't budge.

Ms. Uyar was in Turkey visiting the family of her daughter's husband, Alper Uyar, when she felt tired before she collapsed on August 18.

She was taken to the hospital where doctors tested her blood. They found that their platelet count was only 6,000 per microliter of blood – the minimum safety level is 150,000. This means she cannot clot and will need regular transfusions to stay alive.

She has been moved to several hospitals in Turkey and her platelet count is only 1,000 per microliter.

Ms. Fleming's brother, Ian, 55, told MailOnline how Turkish doctors falsely revoked their coverage by telling the insurance company that the low platelet count was due to Carole's breast cancer drug.

He raged, “You said Carole's problems were a side effect of hormone pills she took to help her recover from breast cancer.

& # 39; But when she stopped taking them, nothing changed. If anything, it got worse.

“The doctors admitted they were wrong and the insurance company is investigating their case, but these things take time.

& # 39; Every hour counts. At the moment she can only keep the blood transfusions going, but she needs immunoglobulin therapy to get in shape and fly home.

& # 39; That costs £ 10,000 a day. So far we've dug deep to pay £ 7,000 but that kind of money just isn't possible.

“The doctors are ready and waiting to start, but there is nothing they can do until they know who is paying for it. It just works like that.

Ms. Uyar was in Turkey visiting the family of her daughter's husband, Alper Uyar, when she felt tired before she collapsed on August 18. Image: Mr. and Mrs. Ulyar

Ms. Uyar was in Turkey visiting the family of her daughter's husband, Alper Uyar, when she felt tired before she collapsed on August 18. Image: Mr. and Mrs. Ulyar

“It's such a difficult situation – if I had been in Turkey I would have lost my temper by now.

& # 39; Carole means the world to me. She helped me raise myself, she is more than just a sister.

“She's just an incredibly kind, incredibly warm and caring person.

“She has spent her life teaching disadvantaged children and these success stories have always excited her.

“After everything she's done to help people, it's horrible to think that she could die from something like an insurance failure.

& # 39; Steph was amazing throughout all of this, she and Alper are just incredibly warm, supportive people who would move heaven and earth to help Carole.

“She's going through hell and she probably feels like her mother is being torn away unnecessarily.

“I try to be strong for her, but I feel so helpless. So completely helpless.

“We can't do anything about Great Britain. We're just sitting here in a circle while Carole fights for her life in Turkey.

Mrs. Uyar pictured with her husband Alper, mother Carole and brother Alex Haworth

The desperate Ms. Uyar (pictured) said: "We are in a desperate Catch-22."

Ms. Uyar (right and left with her husband Alper, mother Carole and brother Alex Haworth) is trying to raise £ 25,000 for a commercial ambulance to bring back to the UK the mother of two who is currently in intensive care in Muğla and in the hands of the NHS

We called the Foreign Office and they said there was nothing they could do – but then they told us they would "repatriate" her when she died.

“We are the fifth richest nation in the world. It's not that we don't have the means to fly a citizen home. & # 39;

Desperate Ms. Uyar said, “In the past three weeks, there have only been two nights that I haven't stayed in a hospital chair by her side.

“It's not even a duty, it's a reflex. After everything she's done for me, I can only be by her side.

“It's like I'm trapped in a horror movie. The things I have seen and seen in the past three weeks I would not wish on my worst enemy.

“No child should see their mother in such a condition.

“To see the woman who was always my rock, who was always there to help me, to see her so vulnerable in a strange place. I will have nightmares about this station for the rest of my life.

“I've tried to stop them by talking about EastEnders or gossiping about people we met on the beach, but it's hard to be calm when I look up to see my mom.

“Her blood cannot clot, which is why she has uncontrollable nosebleeds – sometimes she even cries blood. At one point her tongue was just a giant blood bubble, she could barely speak.

On August 18, the doctors gave her 48 hours to live. But she's a fighter and she's still here – even though they don't yet know what's wrong with her. She refuses to give up. She told me that she will not die in this hospital.

“She'll make it home somehow. I don't care what I have to do to get this done, I'll do it.

When the doctors said they couldn't start treatment without the money I immediately asked if there was a form I could sign, where they would start and if I didn't pay I would go to jail.

“I don't care how bad the prisons are out here. I don't care if it's 15 years, 20 years, 25 years – I would do that time right away if mom gave a chance to make it.

“She has been my best friend all my life. She was there when I met my husband – we were like best friends on vacation in Turkey, and I stumbled in front of Alper's store and he just caught me.

“It was like being in a movie – I think she knew right away that I was going to marry him.

“I could lose my mother and best friend to an insurance gap, and that's the hardest thing to do.

“It is not right that my mother could be taken away from somewhere for a form in an office.

"I just hope that insurers have a heart and understand what it's about."

Click here to donate to Ms. Uyar's underground ambulance appeal.

A spokesman for the Foreign Office said: "We are in contact with the family of a British woman who was hospitalized in Turkey."

(tagsToTranslate) Dailymail (t) News (t) NHS (t) Turkey