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Leicester faces an additional two-week ban because pubs and hairdressers remain closed


Leicester may be forced to extend the blockage by a fortnight from Saturday, while the rest of the country has returned to normal due to nearly 900 new cases since mid-June, the city's Mayor of Labor announced today.

Sir Peter Soulsby said the Ministry of Health wrote to him this morning and suggested that he postpone the opening of pubs, hair salons, museums, playgrounds and other public buildings such as libraries on July 4 to July 18.

The government made the recommendation after 866 new cases in the past 14 days, which are concentrated in the eastern part of the city. However, it is not yet clear whether they have already decided to impose the blocking extension on Leicester.

But Sir Peter, who was previously a Labor MP for Leicester South, said: “What you are proposing is not a return to closure. It appears that they are suggesting that we continue the current level of restriction for another two weeks after July 4th. This is obviously very different from the dramatic lock in Leicester that was taught over the weekend.

Sir Peter added: “I looked at this report and frankly it was obviously cobbled together very hastily. It is superficial and his description of Leicester is inaccurate and certainly does not give us the information we need to stay restricted for two weeks longer than the rest of the country. & # 39;

And when he criticized the lack of data on those who tested positive, he said: “What we have is an assessment of the situation, which is self-partial, which admits that the increase in positive results is due to increased testing and that maybe there is nothing significant in these results. The worry is that if there's anything out there, we have to see it and it has to be street level. "

The epidemiologist Dr. Chris Smith told the BBC that health officials will see the increase in coronavirus cases in Leicester as an opportunity to test how to deal with future localized outbreaks in British cities.

He said, "Rather in a new surge in cases where we'll see waves everywhere. This is summer and we are in the eye of the storm, but winter is coming and we have to plan how to deal with it. We have the opportunity to learn why it happens and how to deal with it. "

A group of young men played cricket yesterday at Spinney Hill Park in east Leicester, where there has been an increase in the past two weeks that could lead to an extension of the closure

A group of young men played cricket yesterday at Spinney Hill Park in east Leicester, where there have been increases in some cases in the past two weeks that could lead to an extension of the closure

A military-operated Covid-19 test center is pictured at Spinney Hill Park in Leicester today, June 28, as the city has the prospect of being cut off from the rest of England due to its increasing coronavirus infection rate

A military-operated Covid-19 test center is pictured at Spinney Hill Park in Leicester today, June 28, as the city has the prospect of being cut off from the rest of England due to its increasing coronavirus infection rate

The Mayor of Leicester, Sir Peter Soulsby, was at the test center yesterday and announced today that the government proposed extending the closure until July 18

The Mayor of Leicester, Sir Peter Soulsby, was at the test center yesterday and announced today that the government proposed extending the closure until July 18

Leicester could face stricter blackout rules next week if the situation in Covid-19 doesn't come under control, meaning the mass relief expected next Saturday if the pubs are due to reopen may be missed.

The Department of Health said it had sent additional test units to Leicester to try to get the virus under control and urged residents there to be strict about social detachment and hand washing.

Minister of the Interior Priti Patel said this morning on the BBC's Andrew Marr Show that it was "right" that a local closure was planned, adding: "With local flare-ups, it is right that we have a localized solution."

Leicester could miss this for two weeks from Saturday

Leicester could miss this for two weeks from Saturday

She added, "We have seen relapses across the country in the past few weeks, especially in the past three or four weeks."

Leicester East MP Claudia Webbe has actively demanded that her constituency be locked and her voters remain at home. Schools and a supermarket would have to be closed because the virus got out of control there. The Labor Party criticized the government's rules on social distancing as "confusing at best".

However, the Mayor of Leicester, Sir Peter Soulsby, said the council had no immediate plans to isolate the city from isolation, and the proposals for next week were "speculative."

He added that his team had been "surprised" because a local ban "was certainly not the conditions under which we spoke".

A scientist in Nottingham said that trying to lock the city alone was difficult because it could spread to neighboring villages and community borders could cut through the middle of a street. Professor Keith Neal said, "If Leicester is closed, how much of the area are you including? A quick look at the satellite image shows this problem … many (people) would not really know where they are. & # 39;

As one of the government's best scientific advisers, Sir Jeremy Farrar, he warned this morning that England was "cutting edge" from its Covid-19 ban and that the situation in the country was "very precarious".

New cases diagnosed in the UK are at a three-month low, but the National Statistics Office warned this week that the rate at which the England outbreak is slowing has "flattened" and there are still an estimated 51,000 infected people in the community with the virus.

HOW MAY LOCAL LOCKDOWNS WORK?

Local bans could be imposed on entire cities if there were regional outbreaks of coronavirus cases, Matt Hancock confirmed in May.

The health minister said that the ability to tighten restrictions in individual regions will be part of the NHS test, track and trace system, which creates networks of people at risk around anyone who tests positive for the corona virus.

Local barriers could result in schools, businesses, or workplaces in areas with high infection prevalence being closed. This is evident from the government's road map to easing restrictions on blocking.

Affected areas could also be disregarded to ease the closure that is being applied to the country on a larger scale.

For example, the pubs are supposed to reopen on July 4th and people can mix in small groups with other households. Areas where there are still a high number of cases could be instructed not to change their rules.

Mr Hancock said at a press conference on Downing Street last month: “We will have local closures in the future when there are flares and we have a system that we are setting up with a combination of Public Health England and the new Joint Biosecurity Center . along with local directors of public health, who play an absolutely vital role in system decision-making to ensure that local flare-ups result in local closures. & # 39;

Prime Minister Boris Johnson has insisted that he will not hesitate to bring the lockout rules back when the virus rises, but has already announced that pubs and cafes will reopen next Saturday, July 4th, and said, that people can visit friends and family in small groups without social distancing.

"Wherever there is a local outbreak, whether in Ashfield or Angelsea, we will authorize local authorities to quarantine anyone who has it until the time of the infection and to make the necessary closures," said the Prime Minister the mail on Sunday.

After a week of large numbers of people in England giving up their social distance and flocking to beaches, street parties and park raves in the scorching summer heat, there were concerns about Leicester. Police had to try to drive people from the Dorset coast, Liverpool streets and parks in London, fearing ruthless celebrations could trigger a second wave of Covid-19.

In other corona virus messages:

  • The Home Secretary said that "airlifts" between Britain and vacation destinations in Europe will not be immediately available, and urged people not to get carried away by vacation booking.
  • One of the government's top scientific advisors, Sir Jeremy Farrar, said Britain – and England in particular – was "up to date" as it emerged from the ban and he expected the cases of Covid-19 to increase within weeks become.
  • Police had trouble opening mass parties in London parks last night when thousands of young people abandoned the rules of social detachment and met With Tooting Bec and Clapham Common.
  • Long locks can weaken people's immune systems because they don't come into contact with so many bacteria and viruses, a scientist warned.
  • One in ten UK pubs cannot be reopened next Saturday due to the cost of implementing social distance rules, and many may never open their doors again, according to the British Institute of Innkeeping.
  • Experts have warned of a "debt bubble" in Britain because eight million people need financial help as a result of the coronavirus crisis.
The Department of Health has acknowledged concerns about an increase in coronavirus cases in Leicester and has urged people living and visiting in the city to be vigilant when it comes to social distancing and hand washing (Image: A sign in the city center).

The Department of Health has acknowledged concerns about an increase in coronavirus cases in Leicester and has urged people living and visiting in the city to be vigilant when it comes to social distancing and hand washing (Image: A sign in the city center).

In the city, test operations have been expanded and military-operated mobile test stations have been set up to help the government deal with the outbreak in the region (Image: Pass-through personnel at Evington Leisure Center).

In the city, test operations have been expanded and military-operated mobile test stations have been set up to help the government deal with the outbreak in the region (Image: Pass-through personnel at Evington Leisure Center).

Leicester East Labor MP Claudia Webbe has encouraged the government to block its constituency.

She told Leicestershire Live that the infection rate in the region had not dropped.

“The schools in Leicester East had to close due to corona virus. A supermarket had to close, ”said Ms. Webbe.

“We know that the problem is in Leicester East and is not spread across the city. People from Leicester East are not allowed to travel through the city.

"I don't know how it would work, but you have to implement a local lock. I think we have to go back to the standard of locking we had at the beginning. & # 39;

Five city schools were forced to close after reporting employee cases, while workers in two Sainsbury stores also contracted Covid-19. And there were outbreaks in sandwich and biscuit factories.

A Ministry of Health spokesman said: “We are supporting the council and local partners in Leicester to prevent further transmission of the virus.

& # 39; We have four mobile test sites and thousands of home test kits to ensure that anyone in the region who needs a test can get one.

& # 39; NHS Test and Trace will contact all those who tested positive to identify their most recent contacts and to advise who may have been near a person with the virus to stay at home and spread prevent.

"We urge the people of Leicester to continue practicing social distancing, washing their hands regularly, getting tested immediately if they experience symptoms, and following the advice they get when they get NHS Test and Trace can be contacted. This advice serves to protect communities and save lives. & # 39;

Hospitals in the Midlands were worst hit outside of London, as data from NHS England show, with 5,707 deaths to date compared to 6,090 in the capital

Hospitals in the Midlands were worst hit outside of London, as data from NHS England show, with 5,707 deaths to date compared to 6,090 in the capital

Leicester East MP Claudia Webbe has called for her constituency to be banned because "the infection rate has not decreased."

Interior Minister Priti Patel said this morning on the Andrew Marr Show: "With local relapses, it is right that we have a localized solution."

Leicester East MP Claudia Webbe (left) has called for her constituency to be banned because "the infection rate has not decreased." Interior Minister Priti Patel (right) said this morning on the Andrew Marr Show: "With local relapses, it is right that we have a localized solution."

A soldier collects coronavirus swab tests from a car at a transit test center in Leicester today

A soldier collects coronavirus swab tests from a car at a transit test center in Leicester today

Members of the public wearing face masks are pictured in Leicester city center today. There are currently no special rules in the city that are reported to have increased in Covid-19 cases

Members of the public wearing face masks are pictured in Leicester city center today. There are currently no special rules in the city that are reported to have increased in Covid-19 cases

Home Secretary Priti Patel admitted on the Andrew Marr Show this morning that Leicester was on high alert.

She said: “We have seen relapses nationwide in the past few weeks, especially in the past three or four weeks.

“There will be support in Leicester, and in fact the Health Minister contacted many of us over the weekend to explain some of the measures, test support and resources that will also go to the local authority.

& # 39; With local flare-ups, it is true that we have a localized solution in terms of infection control, social distancing, testing and many of the public health England tools that come together to control the virus and stop the spread Obviously we can get the infection under control. & # 39;

Concerns about the situation in Leicester arose when police were forced to control the traffic chaos in the county yesterday when the crowd flocked to an annual horse fair in Mountsorrel.

The area on the A6 was very busy when hundreds of travelers came to a small field where the annual horse fair took place.

The police were seen in the area when rows of cars blocked streets and pedestrians crossed busy streets.

It is unclear whether the event was approved by officials, but it is currently illegal to meet outside in groups of more than six people from other households.

Data shows that more than 1,000 people have been officially diagnosed with Covid-19 since the outbreak began, and 271 had died by June 12.

Midlands hospitals, with 5,707 deaths to date, recorded the highest number of deaths in a region outside of London, compared to 6,090 in the capital.

A local ban could mean that Leicester and smaller areas in the area could be denied the new privileges to be granted to the rest of the country next Saturday, July 4th, including the reopening of pubs and restaurants.

People are also allowed to visit the homes of family members and friends, where for the first time since March they can do without social distance and sleep overnight.

But Leicester could lose if officials decide that a local ban is needed there.

Other restrictions could also be reintroduced, such as asking people not to meet with people outside their home.

However, the Mayor of Leicester struck back against growing claims that a ban was imminent.

Sir Peter Soulsby told local news website Leicestershire Live yesterday: “There is no point speculating about a localized block. That sounds very speculative.

“We know that the number of hospitalizations on the spot and mercifully falling, as well as the number of deaths. That is the only fixed data we have.

After weeks of questions, we (the Council) finally received information from the government on Thursday that will help us learn a lot more about which parts of the city could have a particular transmission problem.

& # 39; We're going through this data this weekend. Until we do that, we don't know what intervention might be needed. & # 39;

A scientist said trying to introduce local barriers is difficult because borders can cut through the middle of the street and many cities spread out in the countryside where people consider themselves to be elsewhere.

Professor Keith Neal, epidemiologist at the University of Nottingham, said: “One of the biggest problems is deciding who is in the restricted area and who is not. This has to be understandable both for the people inside and for the people outside.

“The people inside the lock have to understand why they were taken in. Nothing would prevent outside people from taking further voluntary precautions even as individuals if they were concerned.

& # 39; The definition of the specific area will be one of the biggest problems. Community boundaries can run in the middle of the street with one side in a community and the other side.

“A regional ban would be unfair or worse, given that Leicester City really has very little to do with rural Lincolnshire. People do not identify with their regional borders and many would not really know where they are.

“If Leicester is closed, how much of the area do you include? A quick look at the satellite image shows this problem. Much of the area is unlikely to identify itself as part of Leicester City. & # 39;

There is also concern that due to its large ethnic minority, Leicester could experience a large number of deaths if a significant second outbreak of Covid-19 occurs there.

Scientific studies and a report by Public Health England have shown that blacks, Asians and ethnic minorities have a significantly higher risk of death than whites.

According to local data, around 14 percent of people in Leicester are of Asian descent, which is more than three times less than five percent in England as a whole.

Other local closures could target particularly busy areas where crowds have gathered.

For example, the coast in Dorset – particularly Bournemouth Beach – has seen hundreds of thousands of tourists in scorching sunshine this week.

The area council declared a "major incident" because the area was so crowded and the police and politicians were asking people to stay away from the resort.

The police also had to break up parties and raves involving hundreds in London and disperse the crowd in Liverpool after the city's soccer team won the Premier League and celebrated fans on the street.

A local ban could mean that Leicester and smaller areas in the area could be denied the new privileges to be granted to the rest of the country next Saturday, July 4th, including the reopening of pubs and restaurants (archive photo).

A local ban could mean that Leicester and smaller areas in the area could be denied the new privileges to be granted to the rest of the country next Saturday, July 4th, including the reopening of pubs and restaurants (archive photo).

The Home Secretary said the growing number of uncontrolled rallies, which apparently ignored the rules of social distancing, were "unacceptable" and added the risk of Covid-19's return.

Ms. Patel said the police would continue to disband such assemblies and reduce the "full force of the law" to those found guilty of assaulting rescue workers after civil servants were injured in confrontations in London and Liverpool.

Ms. Patel said to Sky News & # 39; Sophy Ridge On Sunday program: & # 39; What we saw at mass gatherings and protests is unacceptable. The violence we saw against our officers is also unacceptable.

"My message is the same – I want to urge people not to participate in such gatherings or protests, but I would also add that if people attack police officers, they will feel the full force of the law."

"It is simply unacceptable for people to gather in the terrible way that we have seen."

She told the Andrew Marr Show that Liverpool fans "don't have to go to the soccer field and gather outside the stadium" to celebrate their team's first top title in 30 years.

Ms. Patel warned that a second wave of Covid-19 would destroy the British economy and said she couldn't think of anything worse than that we had another wave of this terrible disease.

Police chiefs warned the British should take "more personal responsibility" as the number of tickets handed out in the two weeks to June 22 dropped to its lowest level. Thousands have stayed at Bournemouth Beach this week

Police chiefs warned the British should take "more personal responsibility" as the number of tickets handed out in the two weeks to June 22 dropped to its lowest level. Thousands have stayed at Bournemouth Beach this week

Prime Minister Boris Johnson said at his last daily meeting in Downing Street this week that he would not hesitate to pull the "handbrake" to loosen the lock when the virus rebounds.

In an interview with Mail this Sunday, he asked the British people to exercise caution when pubs, restaurants and hotels open on July 4th.

He warned that if the crowded scenes on the beaches were repeated during the heatwave of the past week, he would not hesitate to order micro-closures of individual cities.

Mr. Johnson described the coronavirus crisis as "one of the greatest challenges this country has faced in 75 years" and said: "The government did some things right, but the greatest thing of all was that the public did it right . "

"I say to the people that go out in large groups – you may think that you are immortal, that you will not suffer, but the beetle that you carry can kill your family and friends.

“We want to get to a world as quickly as possible in which we are as close to the normal as possible. I don't want a second lock. & # 39;

Britain is up to date with the coronavirus crisis and could face a severe second wave in winter if people can't tell Covid-19 from a cold, the SAGE scientist warns

Britain is up to date in its coronavirus crisis and faces a very real risk of a second surge in winter, one of the government's top advisers warned.

Sir Jeremy Farrar, director of the London-based charity Wellcome Trust and member of the Scientific Advisory Group on Emergency (SAGE), said he was "concerned" about the prospect of the virus returning.

He expects the number of people diagnosed with the virus to increase over the next few weeks and into July.

Next Saturday, July 4th, the biggest easing of the blocking rules since March is expected in England as the pubs are reopened and people can mix with other households.

Sir Jeremy said the country is facing a "very precarious situation" and examples are already appearing of people who violate social distance rules.

Crowds were seen on Bournemouth beach last week, the police broke up raves and parties in London, and Liverpool FC fans celebrating the team's Premier League victory celebrated on the streets against official advice.

The Wellcome Trust chief said it was even more difficult to control a second increase in winter when people struggled to distinguish Covid-19 from a cold or flu.

He told the BBC's Andrew Marr Show that because of the risk that it could be a coronavirus, people need to think more carefully about going to work when they are sick.

Sir Jeremy Farrar, a member of the government's SAGE science committee, said England was in a "very precarious situation".

Sir Jeremy Farrar, a member of the government's SAGE science committee, said England was in a "very precarious situation".

Sir Jeremy said: “In fact, the restrictions were lifted around this bank holiday in late May and early June.

„Ich würde vorhersagen, ich würde vermuten, dass wir gegen Ende Juni oder in der ersten Juliwoche einige Erhöhungen in den Fällen sehen werden.

"Wir sind auf dem neuesten Stand – die Situation ist sehr prekär – insbesondere in England im Moment, und ich würde davon ausgehen, dass in den kommenden Wochen mehr neue Fälle auftreten werden."

Das Gesundheitsministerium hat in der letzten Woche durchschnittlich 1.018 Fälle von Covid-19 pro Tag diagnostiziert, den niedrigsten wöchentlichen Durchschnitt seit Ende März.

Es wird jedoch immer noch angenommen, dass Zehntausende von Menschen mit dem Virus infiziert sind – das Amt für nationale Statistiken schätzt, dass zu jedem Zeitpunkt rund 51.000 Menschen betroffen sind.

Das ONS in dieser Woche warnte davor, dass der seit Mai rasante Rückgang der Zahl der Infizierten „abgeflacht“ ist.

Dies bedeutet, dass der Ausbruch nicht mehr so ​​schnell schrumpft wie zuvor und das Risiko besteht, dass er wieder ansteigt.

MILLIONEN MEHR MENSCHEN KÖNNTEN IN DER GLOBALEN ZWEITEN WELLE VON COVID-19 STERBEN, DER WARNT, WENN FÄLLE 10 MILLIONEN SCHLAGEN

Mittlerweile sind mehr als 10 Millionen Menschen mit dem Coronavirus infiziert, und Millionen Menschen auf der ganzen Welt könnten sterben, wenn es in Europa und Asien zu einer zweiten Infektionswelle kommt, warnte die Weltgesundheitsorganisation.

Nord- und Südamerika sind immer noch von wütenden Covid-19-Ausbrüchen betroffen, aber ein Großteil Asiens und Europas ist aus der schlimmsten Pandemie hervorgegangen, wie Daten zeigen.

Dr. Ranieri Guerra, stellvertretender Generaldirektor für strategische Initiativen bei der WHO, sagte jedoch, Covid-19 könne einem ähnlichen Muster wie die spanische Grippe folgen und mit verheerenden Folgen zurückkehren.

Herr Guerra sagte, die Pandemie von 1918/19 sei im September und Oktober – als die Temperaturen kühler waren – nach einem Einbruch im Sommer "heftig wieder aufgenommen" worden.

Er sagte gegenüber dem italienischen Rai TV: "Der Vergleich ist mit der spanischen Grippe, die sich genau wie Covid verhielt: Sie ging im Sommer zurück und wurde im September und Oktober heftig wieder aufgenommen, was in der zweiten Welle zu 50 Millionen Todesfällen führte."

Seine Warnung wurde von Christine Lagarde, Chefin der Europäischen Zentralbank, bestätigt, die am Freitag sagte: "Natürlich könnte es eine schwere zweite Welle geben, wenn wir etwas aus der spanischen Grippe von 1918-19 lernen."

Der Ausbruch der spanischen Grippe verwüstete zahlreiche Länder auf der ganzen Welt, darunter Großbritannien mit mehr als 220.000 Todesfällen und die USA mit 675.000 Todesfällen.

Das Virus trat erstmals im Frühjahr 1918 auf, scheint jedoch mutiert zu sein, als es im Herbst erneut anstieg, was zu einer tödlicheren zweiten Welle führte.

Es wurde durch die Tatsache verschlimmert, dass es zu Ende ging, als der Erste Weltkrieg zu Ende ging.

"Es kam brüllend zurück und war viel schlimmer", sagte der Epidemiologe Dr. William Hanage von der T.H. Chan School of Public Health sagte.

Dies ist wahrscheinlich, weil sich die Sperrregeln in den letzten sechs Wochen so stark gelockert haben, aber es könnte ein Zeichen der Gefahr sein, wenn die Zahlen wieder steigen.

Das ONS, das seine Schätzung auf nur 14 positiven Tests aus einer Stichprobe von 24.256 Personen stützte, sagte: 'Die Modellierung des Trends im Zeitverlauf legt nahe, dass sich der Rückgang der Anzahl der positiv getesteten Personen in England in den letzten Wochen abgeflacht hat.

"Diese Schätzungen deuten darauf hin, dass der Prozentsatz der positiven Tests seit unserer ersten Messung am 26. April im Laufe der Zeit deutlich zurückgegangen ist, und dieser Abwärtstrend hat sich jetzt abgeflacht."

Obwohl sich die Geschwindigkeit, mit der Englands Ausbruch abnimmt, verlangsamt hat – was zu erwarten ist, wenn die Sperrung aufgehoben wird -, stimmte Sir Jeremy zu, dass es „vernünftig“ ist, die Regeln weiter zu lockern.

Dies vor einem Monat zu tun, wäre zu früh gewesen, sagte er, und er forderte die Leute immer noch auf, „wirklich vorsichtig“ zu sein.

Er war besonders besorgt darüber, dass Menschen drinnen in der Nähe anderer waren, und gab zu, dass es ein geringeres Risiko war, draußen zu sein.

Er fügte hinzu: „In all dem besteht kein Null-Risiko. Wir sind nicht in dem Stadium, in dem das Virus verschwunden ist … Es bleibt das gleiche Virus. & # 39;

Das Erlernen der Eindämmung von Ausbrüchen auf lokaler Ebene könnte eine zweite nationale Katastrophe vermeiden, wie sie im März ganz Großbritannien getroffen hat, sagte er.

Im Herbst und Winter dürfte eine echte zweite Welle auftauchen, sagte Sir Jeremy – er sagte voraus, dass sie im Oktober und November beginnen könnte.

Eine Beschleunigung dieses Risikos wäre die Tatsache, dass bis dahin normale Erkältungen und Grippe im Umlauf sind und die Menschen Schwierigkeiten haben werden, den Unterschied zwischen diesen und Covid-19 zu erkennen.

Die Hauptsymptome von Covid-19 sind nach der Definition der britischen Regierung ein neuer Husten oder Fieber (hohe Temperatur). Der dritte ist ein veränderter oder verlorener Geruchs- oder Geschmackssinn.

Alle drei Symptome können durch Grippe und Erkältungen verursacht werden, und Menschen können sich mit Erkältungen selbst isolieren oder in der Verwirrung mit Covid-19 arbeiten.

Er sagte: „Das wirklich Schwierige für uns alle im September und Oktober ist, wenn wir alle normalen Husten und Erkältungen bekommen und die Kinder wieder zur Schule gehen und Atemwegsinfektionen bekommen, die zu dieser Jahreszeit normal sind: Haben wir die Fähigkeit, normale Infektionen der Atemwege – Influenza und andere – von Covid-19 zu unterscheiden?

„Können wir die Übertragungsketten sofort innerhalb von 48 Stunden nach Beginn neuer Fälle unterbrechen?

„Und es wird einige Störungen geben, wenn Menschen mit Husten und Erkältungen zur Arbeit kommen, in die Schule kommen und die Konsequenzen darüber nachdenken müssen.

„Wenn wir bis Juli und August vernünftig vorgehen, können wir die nationale Katastrophe im März und April verhindern.

"Wenn wir dies nicht tun – wenn wir diese nationalen Kerninfrastrukturen nicht haben -, werden wir im Winter einen sehr bösen Aufschwung erleben."

(tagsToTranslate) Dailymail (t) Nachrichten (t) Matt Hancock (t) Coronavirus