ENTERTAINMENT

"Largely recycled" labels on prepackaged sandwiches are "misleading".


"Mostly recycled" labels on prepackaged sandwiches are "misleading" because the boxes are lined with plastic, says TV chef Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall

  • Sandwich packaging can significantly exacerbate the problem of plastic waste
  • Labels on cardboard boxes that claim they are "largely recycled" are "completely misleading".
  • Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall found that many packages were plastic-lined

As a country, we eat our way through six million of them every day.

However, buying sandwiches can exacerbate the plastic waste problem due to problems with recycling packaging.

According to Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall, the labels on sandwich boxes that claim they are "largely recycled" are "completely misleading".

He found that many packages had a plastic lining, which made it "almost impossible" to properly recycle.

Buying sandwiches (stock items) can exacerbate the plastic waste problem due to packaging recycling problems

Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall (pictured) says the labels on sandwich boxes that claim they are "largely recycled" are "completely misleading".

Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall (pictured) says the labels on sandwich boxes that claim they are "largely recycled" are "completely misleading".

On an episode of his BBC series War on Plastic that aired last night, the chef met with Simon Ellin of the Recycling Association to discuss the matter.

They looked at six popular sandwiches, including a Tesco Cheddar Ploughman and a M&S free range egg.

Mr. Ellin said, "We have the plastic window on the outside and the plastic wrap on the inside.

"Even if you remove the front layer, the inner plastic layer is glued so tightly … you can never remove it."

"It doesn't make it recyclable for me."

He said to recycle the packaging, buyers would have to separate the plastic and throw it away.

The couple tried this with the popular sandwiches, claiming it was "hopeless".

Claire Hughes, Sainsbury's director of quality and innovation, also received one of the supermarket's egg and cress sandwiches and did her best to separate the plastic from the carton.

With our “Turn The Tide On Plastic” campaign, the Daily Mail has taken on a pioneering role in the fight against non-recyclable waste.

Sainsbury said it was working to find a long-term solution to make sandwich packaging more recyclable.

An M&S spokesman said: "We are introducing new, industry-first sandwich packaging that contains 40 percent less plastic film and is secured with peelable adhesive."

Tesco did not respond to requests for comment.

÷ MICROPLASTICS in the soil can reduce the number of insects and insects. Chinese scientists who injected plastic particles into the soil found that there were 62 percent fewer ants and 41 percent fewer caterpillars than in the soil without plastic.

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