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Kit Malthouse claims you can cycle up to 70 miles from home


Brits can do 70-mile bike rides but only sit on park benches "for a short break", should carefully consider meeting a friend while walking for coffee, and never go to the supermarket without a mask, ministers said today .

Police Minister Kit Malthouse also accused the public of "looking for loopholes" by disregarding the third national lockdown – compared to pubs serving scotch eggs to stay open last year – and insisted it was the The police's job is to check where people are going and who they meet outdoors.

Amid widespread confusion about whether people are allowed to sit on park benches during their daily exercise, # 10 MailOnline sources also said that a "short break" during exercise was "appropriate". However, they stressed that it was illegal to go out "just to sit in public".

But Mr. Malthouse insisted that Boris Johnson's decision to cycle in Olympic Park seven miles from Downing Street was "within the rules" and legal. He said the Prime Minister's Sunday ride in east London was okay because "locally is open to interpretation" and that a 50-70 mile bike ride would be okay in most cases.

He said, “I understand this is kind of a scotch egg moment where people look for the loopholes and the problems in the law. Unfortunately, we cannot legislate for every single dynamic in human existence. If you can get there on your own and not interact with someone … then that makes perfect sense to me.

It came when City Police Commissioner Dame Cressida Dick said today that the police will "move quickly" to fine individuals who openly ignore the coronavirus lockdown rules and that officials in London will do more than 24 hours 300 fixed criminal charges for "flagrant" had issued. Violations of the regulations.

And in a veiled review of the Prime Minister's bike tour in the Olympic Park, Dame Cressida Dick said, "To me, a reasonable interpretation of that is that you can do your exercise from your front door and return to your front door," adding, "The public sees all of us as role models ".

No. 10 has yet to confirm whether Mr Johnson rode his bike to the Olympic Park himself or was brought to east London by car when some Tory MPs complained that too much power was being given to the police.

Dame Cressida has also asked the government to put the definition of “local” in law to ease the burden on the police, as officials in Devon and Cornwall have been found to be using Automatic Number Plate Recognition (ANPR) technology to ensure that only essential journeys are made during the lockdown – and hunt down people traveling in second homes.

Hampshire Police also use drones to monitor people visiting the Southsea waterfront to ensure they are socially distant and not grouped together.

As Mr Johnson also warned of tougher Covid-19 curbs if existing restrictions were ignored:

  • Labor Leads urge Prime Minister to cut red tape and allow around the clock shocks after police, teachers and shift workers were vaccinated after No. 10 insisted there is no "noise" for appointments after 8pm.
  • Sainsbury & # 39; s joins Morrisons as they reinstate bouncers outside of supermarkets to challenge people who don't wear masks or ignore social distancing – but security sees they can't enforce them;
  • The mess for thousands of UK travelers as the government has yet to disclose what Covid tests tourists will need to take before flying to the UK.
  • Another 529 virus deaths were recorded yesterday, up from 407 the week before, with 46,169 new cases;

Mr Malthouse said Boris Johnson's decision to cycle in the Olympic Park seven miles from Downing Street was "within the rules". PM pictured in 2016

The UK Police Minister said driving up to 70 miles is allowed if people

The UK Police Minister said a drive of up to 70 miles is allowed if people can get there "on their own". Cyclists ride through Greenwich Park last week

Ministers say someone can stop on a park bench - but only for a short time before continuing. The police are pictured in St. James & # 39; Park on Saturday

Ministers say someone can stop on a park bench – but only for a short time before continuing. The police are pictured in St. James & # 39; Park on Saturday

What is defined as local and what is allowed?

Government rules state that "you should not travel outside your area" to play sports.

However, what is “local” and what is not was up for debate.

At yesterday's Downing Street press conference, Health Secretary Matt Hancock was asked if the British could exercise seven miles from home.

He replied, "It's okay to leave when you've been on a long walk and are seven miles from home. That's okay, but you should stay on-site."

He added: “You shouldn't go from one side of the country to the other and possibly take the virus with you because remember that one in three people who has the virus doesn't know they have it because they don't have symptoms.

"It's okay to go for a long walk or bike ride or exercise, but stay there."

Mr Malthouse also said that all supermarkets are "taking their responsibility back" by not refusing entry to anyone without a face mask and again reducing the number of people affected as the fraudsters face fines from the police. Brian Booth, chairman of the West Yorkshire Police Federation, said this morning, "We just don't have the resources to go to every supermarket."

Kit Malthouse's argument that long bike rides are allowed was undermined by Kerrin Wilson, deputy chief of police for the Lincolnshire Police Department, who said of a local driver who drives 50 to 60 miles, "What you need to understand is if he is falls off his bike and is How far will he get help if he gets a flat tire? Other people may be at risk. "

Despite the confusion about what is and cannot be allowed during the current lockdown, such as stopping on a bench or having a takeaway coffee while out walking with a friend, the UK's senior police officer said it was "absurd" for people to come might know nothing of the need to follow the third national lockdown and warned that rule violations will be fined.

Police chief Dame Cressida Dick said people are still holding house parties, meeting in basements to play, and attending unlicensed raves despite the rising number of coronavirus cases and deaths.

She warned that breaking or breaking the rules would lead officials to "move to enforcement action much faster" and urged the government to change the definition of "local" in law as in Scotland and Anchor Wales.

Boris Johnson is under pressure to increase social distance to ten feet to stop the spread of the coronavirus – and tighten the existing lockdown, including potentially preventing people from leaving the home every day.

Mr Malthouse said, “Whether or not there will be any major restrictions will depend a lot on the numbers. We track the infection rate.

Senior Tory MP: Police are getting too much power during lockdown

Conservative MP and former Cabinet Secretary David Davis told Times Radio that it was not normal for the police to have so much power

“The trouble is, I really don't think we should give the police that much judgment. In this country it is not normal for police officers to have – in others – but it is not normal in the UK for the police to have the power to stop and impose fines on some kind of judgment issue. & # 39;

He told Aasmah Mir and Stig Abell that the laws were too harsh because they were not properly discussed in Parliament.

“This has been evident since March 23, when the law under which this was done was made by the state and the government. If you actually don't give power to a police officer who is not an epidemiologist, he is not a doctor, you know, he has to do by guesswork and by God's judgment, whether this is in or out of the rules and very vague rules then it is a very bad way & # 39 ;.

He added, "It is an inevitable result of a very crude law that has not been properly thought through at all."

“In all fairness, we're all excited to see how the impact of the Boxing Day restrictions will affect the numbers, especially in London and the South East.

“This virus is moving so fast that the government is having to make very, very agile decisions about the way we live our lives.

“But like I said, if we want to make sure this is the final lockdown – please God it is – we all have to follow the rules and take them really, really seriously.

"Unfortunately, in some parts of the country we haven't seen a minority of people who frankly abandon the rest of us."

Police officers hope the public will see what "local" means for movement, said Police Minister Kit Malthouse.

When asked if 'local' should be defined in England, he told Times Radio: 'We hope that most people will realize that local, while open to personal interpretation, has some implications, that is, you can get under it . " your own steam?

& # 39; We're trying to strike a balance between following the rules and the elements of public approval of what is happening.

“I think most people would find that reasonable.

"Wherever there are unreasonable people who break this rule, the police intervene."

Mr Malthouse has said that all supermarkets should follow in Morrison's footsteps to force masks to be worn in stores and prevent the virus from spreading.

When asked why he believed supermarkets had not previously done this, he told Times Radio, "I think that after the lockdown in November there was understandably an element of release and hence the person at the door, the plumbing, the traffic light system obviously decreased the queues outside.

"What we hope now, and I know that you will all do it, that you will see your responsibility and begin to get these things back in place."

Police use ANPR to track major trips in Cornwall and Devon and to track people driving to their second homes

Police in Devon and Cornwall use Automatic Number Plate Recognition (ANPR) technology to enforce Covid-19 regulations.

Police chief of the armed forces Shaun Sawyer said ANPR cameras across the area are being used to ensure that only essential travel is made.

Static roadside cameras in various locations across the region are in use, while each armed forces officer also has access to an ANPR app on their devices.

This allows them to access live information on vehicles they are driving past.

Alison Hernandez, police and detective commissioner for Devon and Cornwall and the Isles of Scilly, said the technology was needed during England's third national lockdown.

"Covid is spreading rapidly across the UK, not least because this new strain of the virus is far more contagious," she said.

“We have to do everything we can to prevent the spread of the coronavirus.

“I was saddened by the reports of hundreds of Covid violations over the weekend, many of which are related to second homes.

“Therefore, I welcome the use of ANPR by the armed forces to monitor vehicle movement and to ensure that the only journeys made here are essential. With this technology, we can see where certain vehicles came from and the officers can further investigate their reasons for the trip. & # 39;

When asked if the police should intervene, he said some retail officials have fined, adding, "We hope the vast majority of people or everyone will be encouraged by the shopkeeper."

Police chief Dame Cressida Dick said people are still holding house parties, meeting in basements to play, and attending unlicensed raves despite the rising number of coronavirus cases and deaths.

She warned that anyone caught breaking or failing to comply with the rules would result in officials "moving into enforcement action much faster".

It does so amid mounting calls for stricter shutdown restrictions, with No10 even considering the introduction of Chinese-style curfews, outdoor masked mandates, and ten feet of social distancing.

Dame Cressida wrote in the Times today: “It is absurd to me that no one could be aware of our duty to do everything possible to stop the virus from spreading. We were aware that those who violate Covid-19 legislation are increasingly being fined.

"We will continue to engage, explain and encourage, but those who break the rules or refuse to abide by them for no good reason will find officials move to enforcement action much faster."

The Met Police Chief also urged the government to ensure that police officers are given priority over the Covid bite when the vaccine is rolled out.

When asked about the Covid restrictions and Boris Johnson's bike ride seven miles from his home, City Police Commissioner Dame Cressida Dick told BBC Radio 4's Today program: “I will not comment on individual cases. I really am not. & # 39;

The police chief, pressing for the prime minister to be a role model, said: “The public sees us all as role models for all of us in public life, if you wish.

“What I can say is that it's not against the law. I think that's implicit. & # 39;

Leading members of Sage's Scientific Advisory Board want social distancing measures to be increased from “one meter plus” to “two meters plus”.

In practice, this would change the limit to ten feet – nearly ten feet. The drastic suggestion came when an angry Matt Hancock denounced people who violated social distancing rules.

At a press conference on Downing Street, the Health Secretary said he would "not rule out further action if necessary".

Aided by Chief Medical Officer Chris Whitty, who sits on top of Sage, he said it was time to double the curbs from Covid – including outdoor contact.

When asked if a ten-foot rule would be introduced in England, a Downing Street spokesman said last night: "There are currently no plans to change the social distancing rules. However, everything is checked. & # 39;

It came when the country recorded another 529 Covid deaths on Monday – a 30 percent increase from the 407 reported the same day last week.

It was the deadliest Monday since April 20, when 570 people lost their lives, and it was the worst week of death in the UK since the pandemic began. An average of 931 people lost their lives in each of the last seven days, compared to the highest 7-day average of 920 in the first wave in April.

In a positive sign that the UK's rising case load could ease, 46,169 people tested positive for the virus – a 20 percent decrease in one week.

Covid Marshals speak to a cyclist who sat on the promenade at Bournemouth Beach on Sunday

Covid Marshals speak to a cyclist who sat on the promenade at Bournemouth Beach on Sunday

Cyclists supported the Prime Minister's trip to the Olympic Park and said he was a good example to the public

Cyclists supported the Prime Minister's trip to the Olympic Park and said he was a good example to the public

Boris Johnson is under pressure from members of Sage's scientific advisory board to increase social distance to stop the spread of the coronavirus

Boris Johnson is under pressure from members of Sage's scientific advisory board to increase social distance to stop the spread of the coronavirus

The Prime Minister was seen pedaling through the Olympic Park - seven miles from No. 10 - raising questions as to whether he was breaking or in the spirit of the lockdown rules

The Prime Minister was seen pedaling through the Olympic Park – seven miles from No. 10 – raising questions as to whether he was breaking or in the spirit of the lockdown rules

The distance was set at two meters in March after experts said the coronavirus was up to ten times more transmittable at one meter than at two. Now experts want the public to stay within the distance of public transport, on supermarket lines and on the go

The distance was set at two meters in March after experts said the coronavirus was up to ten times more transmittable at one meter than at two. Now experts want the public to stay within the distance of public transport, on supermarket lines and on the go

The UK recorded an additional 529 Covid deaths yesterday - a 30 percent increase from the 407 reported the same day last week. It's also the deadliest Monday since April 20, when 570 people lost their lives

The UK recorded an additional 529 Covid deaths yesterday – a 30 percent increase from the 407 reported the same day last week. It's also the deadliest Monday since April 20, when 570 people lost their lives

The first day of the grocery raid fails as shoppers reveal that security guards DO NOT order them to wear masks – while police say YOU are not responsible for enforcing rules in stores

A maskless shopper in Morrisons, South East London. The woman, who only gave her first name Gladys, said: "I had a mask with me, but just forgot it."

The supermarket mask crackdown ran into problems from day one as some shoppers continued to refuse to obey the rules.

Sainsbury & # 39; s and Morrisons were the first supermarkets to revert to stricter enforcement in March, reintroducing bouncers at the door to ensure all customers wear face covers.

In the past few months, shoppers have been seen repeatedly breaking the rules by becoming maskless after many stores left the guards.

But as number 10 rang alarm bells and scientists warned stores would add to the surge in cases, supermarkets today declared a new pinch.

Brian Booth, chairman of the West Yorkshire Police Federation, warned this morning that there are not enough officials to enforce mask rules in supermarkets and it was up to the stores themselves to do so.

"We don't have enough resources to deal with it," he said. “Take a look at how many stores, supermarkets, and stores there are in each neighborhood.

"If there's an ongoing crime, attack, or threat to someone, it has to be a priority, but we just don't have the resources to be in every supermarket."

Meanwhile, Met Chief Cressida Dick said it was "absurd" for people to claim they were ignorant of the rules.

Boris Johnson is preparing to tighten the lockdown rules further, including restricting outdoor contact.

Sainsbury & # 39; s sent an email to all customers today saying that guards would challenge maskless customers or people shopping in groups.

Morrisons has already reinstated door security and vowed to ban anyone who refuses to wear face covering without a medical exception.

Shoppers arriving at Morrisons in Peckham, south London, were greeted by a security guard who instructed them to put on their masks or they would not be allowed inside.

A woman who came without her mask was warned that if she did not put it on, she would not be allowed to continue her shop.

The woman, who only gave her first name Gladys, said: “I had a mask with me, but just forgot it. I've come to the supermarket many times and haven't put it on, but I think it's good that they enforce this. & # 39;

But after Gladys put on her mask, she lowered it under her mouth as she continued with her business. She said, “I find it too uncomfortable. I don't understand what the fuss is, I have a mask on, it just doesn't cover my nose and mouth at the moment. & # 39;

When Gladys was shopping in the store, she wasn't challenged as to how she wore her mask.

The Daily Mail was told that several members of Sage say the lockdown must be tougher than the first one in March last year.

The idea of ​​a Chinese-style ban on residents leaving their homes was raised at a meeting.

Ministers are angry that some people are using their right to daily exercise just as an excuse to meet friends in the park for coffee.

A source said, “If it means limiting people to a single hour-long walk once a week, that's what we have to do. We can't let a few selfish idiots put the whole country in danger. & # 39;

It is feared that failure to comply with restrictions will increase the number of deaths and risk overwhelming hospitals.

Increasing the social distancing rule to ten feet is seen as a way to stop the spread of the new variant of the virus, which is easier to pass.

Opponents of the move say it will have little impact, create more confusion, and be a logistical nightmare.

Two-meter signs have been painted on sidewalks across the country, with similar notices in tens of thousands of shops, factories, offices and public places.

A change would increase the cost of fighting the pandemic.

Supporters claim the benefit of saving lives and protecting the NHS means the move is worth it. They argue that it is an answer to the new variant that is said to be up to 70 percent more transferable.

If it continues, it would be the government's third social distancing policy.

The distance was set at two meters in March after experts said the coronavirus was up to ten times more transmittable at one meter than at two.

After the first lockdown, it was reduced to “one meter plus” in July – mainly to make it easier for restaurants and cafes to reopen.

A two-meter-plus rule in practice would mean staying three meters apart – almost 10 feet – unless measures were taken to limit the risk of transmission, such as a traffic jam. B. Screens.

Differences in social distance vary across the world.

In China, Hong Kong and Singapore, which successfully battled the pandemic, the distance was one meter.

However, they imposed other, far stricter rules, including curfews. Spain and Canada followed the two-meter rule.

The other three home countries have different versions of the two-meter rule.

In Scotland, people are advised to stay two meters apart and in Wales they are advised to stay two meters apart, unless this is impractical, with the exception of young children.

The gap in Northern Ireland has narrowed to one meter but is now two again.

Professor Paul Hunter of the University of East Anglia said, “The further you are from someone, the less risk you risk.

“Three meters reduces the risk a bit compared to two meters – but it's hard to say how much and if that would make a big difference. I suspect the main problem is with people who don't stick to the two-meter rule. & # 39;

Cautioned against trying to push the limits while exercising, Mr. Hancock added, “If too many people break this rule, we'll look at it. Don't say you're working out if you're really just socializing. & # 39;

He said the two-meter rule should be followed, not as a "limit to be challenged".

Shortly after Mr Hancock's press conference on Downing Street on Monday, the Prime Minister posted a short video that was filmed during his visit to the Ashton Gate vaccination center in Bristol.

In it, he urged the British to "follow instructions to stay home, protect the NHS and save lives" as Covid continues to spread rapidly in several parts of the country.

The British shouldn't lose focus on the pandemic as the coronavirus "is still causing big problems for our NHS," Johnson added.

Mr Hancock also used the briefing to defend the Prime Minister after he was seen in Olympic Park seven miles from Downing Street when he appeared to be violating government recommendations.

The health minister said it is allowed to drive this distance from where you live to do sports, although he also insists that people must "stay".

But he also warned that the rules for two people from different households to exercise outdoors together could be lifted if people continued to abuse them.

"If too many people break this rule, we have to look at them, but I don't want to," Hancock said of a 10 briefing last night.

What are the government rules for exercising?

You should minimize the amount of time away from your home, but you can leave home to exercise.

This should be limited to once per day and you shouldn't travel outside of your area.

You can exercise in a public place outdoors:

  • of yourself
  • with the people you live with
  • with your support bubble (if you are legally entitled to create one)
  • in a childcare bubble where childcare is offered
  • or, if you are alone, with someone from another household

This includes running, biking, hiking, and swimming, among others.

Personal training can be continued individually, unless everyone is in the same household or in the same support bubble.

Public outdoor spaces are:

  • Parks, beaches, publicly accessible landscape, forests
  • public gardens (whether or not you pay to enter)
  • the site of a cultural heritage
  • playgrounds

The Prime Minister was seen wearing a hat and face mask on his bike at the venue, seven miles from Downing Street, yesterday afternoon.

A source told the Evening Standard that Mr. Johnson was training along with his security detail.

The Prime Minister is said to have "noticed how busy" the park was and later pointed this out at a meeting.

According to official government guidelines, movement should be restricted to once a day and "you should not travel outside your area".

Two women were fined £ 200 each by Derbyshire Police for walking five miles from their home while officials in Whitby beat people for sledging.

One witness said: “He was leisurely driving with another man in a cap and chatting while about four security guards, possibly more, cycled behind them.

Realizing the person looked like Boris, I drove past them to hear his voice and be sure it was him. It was definitely Boris.

"Given the current situation with Covid, I was shocked to see him driving around so carelessly," added the woman, who asked not to be named.

Even though he advises everyone to stay home and not leave their area, shouldn't they stay in Westminster and not travel to other districts? & # 39;

The Prime Minister's spokesman yesterday was unable to provide any information on why Mr Johnson had gone to Stratford and why it was within the rules.

It is also not clear whether Mr Johnson was ridden to the park on his bike or rode all the way there and back.

Tim Farron, MP for Lib Dem, said, “The government's guidelines for travel to sport are as clear as mud.

“People travel hundreds of miles to the Lake District while others are scared to drive 5 minutes to the local park.

"I have written to the Prime Minister asking him to give clear instructions once and for all."

A shopper in Morrisons, Leeds, not wearing a mask

A maskless customer at an Asda in Swindon

One shopper in Morrisons in Leeds without a mask (left) and another in an Asda in Swindon (right). It is not clear whether the customers depicted have valid exemptions for walking without a mask

Buyers of a Tesco Extra in south east London this morning. The rules state that masks must be worn over the nose and mouth

Buyers of a Tesco Extra in south east London this morning. The rules state that masks must be worn over the nose and mouth

In a video posted on the Prime Minister's official Twitter account last night, which includes footage of Mr Johnson's visit to Bristol on Monday, the Prime Minister praised the government's vaccination program.

But he warned the British that this shouldn't lead to complacency as the new variant of Covid is still spreading rapidly.

Mr Johnson said, 'Hi guys. I'm here at this amazing mass vaccination center in Bristol in a football stadium and it's one of the 50 we'll be rolling out by the end of the month to help all of the over 1,000 GP surgeries across the 233 hospital locations. plus the 200 pharmacies.

“And of course that's just the beginning when we deliver the vaccine.

“When I speak to you this morning, we've done about 2.4 million thrusts, 2 million people in the country who have already been vaccinated, and we're going to increase that massively over the next few weeks once we get it, we hope by the middle February up to 15 million.

“And that is a very ambitious program. We are confident that we can do it.

“But when we meet the people, it is incredibly important that we don't lose focus on the pandemic, which unfortunately is still happening in so many parts of the country and still filling our hospitals with Covid patients and still having major causes , big problems for our NHS.

“So everyone has to follow the instructions. Stay home protect the NHS and save lives. & # 39;

Along with his video, the Prime Minister tweeted, “If we get bumped in the arms, we must not lose sight of the state of the pandemic – which is putting enormous pressure on our NHS.

"So please follow the rules and stay home to protect the NHS and save lives."

The mess for thousands of UK travelers as the government has yet to disclose what tests tourists must take before heading to the UK

Britons overseas face a race to return home before the rules requiring international travelers to test negative for coronavirus before arriving in England come into effect – and the UK government has yet to publish full guidelines on which tests they will accept .

As of 4 a.m. this Friday, those arriving by boat, train or plane – including UK nationals – must take a test up to 72 hours before leaving the country of departure.

However, there is still a lack of clarity about which tests will be accepted. The UK government's latest guidance yesterday referred to how "in some cases" cross-flow tests might be allowed – saying that further advice will be given to passengers.

Lateral flow tests are cheaper and give results in 30 minutes, while polymerase chain reaction (PCR) tests take up to three days to identify positive cases.

The British are required to provide their carrier with evidence of a negative test result upon boarding, while the British border guards do spot checks on arrival.

Passengers at London Heathrow Airport last week. The rules requiring international travelers to take a negative coronavirus test before arriving in England go into effect this Friday

Passengers at London Heathrow Airport last week. The rules requiring international travelers to take a negative coronavirus test before arriving in England go into effect this Friday

Conservative MP Henry Smith, chairman of the all-party aviation group, welcomed the test requirement for every passenger coming to the UK, pointing out that he proposed it back in January in the House of Commons.

The MP, whose constituency includes Gatwick Airport, told MailOnline: “It's been taking a long time and it's not entirely clear how it all works.

„Es scheint extrem lange zu dauern, etwas zu bestimmen, was viele andere Länder seit vielen Monaten tun. Dies sollte nicht so lange dauern wie es ist.

„All dies ist komplex, aber es ist relativ einfach, Leute zu bitten, bestimmte Arten von Tests abzulegen. Ich sehe nicht, was die Verzögerung ist, wenn man sich darüber klar ist. & # 39;

In den neuesten Leitlinien, die gestern vom Verkehrsministerium veröffentlicht wurden, heißt es: „Wir werden die Standards festlegen, die Tests in Vorschriften erfüllen müssen.

Dies schließt ein, dass der Test ein diagnostischer Standardtest wie ein Polymerasekettenreaktionstest (PCR) sein muss und in einigen Fällen LAMP- und Lateral-Flow-Tests innerhalb festgelegter Grenzen umfassen kann.

"Wir werden den Passagieren klare Anleitungen und Ratschläge zu Teststandards und Kapazität geben."

Neuankömmlinge, die gegen die Regeln verstoßen, müssen mit einer Geldstrafe von mindestens 500 GBP rechnen, während der Betreiber, der sie befördert hat, ebenfalls mit einer Geldstrafe belegt wird.

Passagiere müssen unabhängig von ihren Testergebnissen noch 10 Tage unter Quarantäne gestellt werden, sagte Verkehrsminister Robert Courts in einer Erklärung.

Britische Staatsangehörige, die versuchen, nach Hause zurückzukehren und positiv getestet wurden, dürfen nicht reisen und müssen den örtlichen Anweisungen in ihrem Gastland folgen und sich an das nächstgelegene Konsulat wenden, wenn sie Unterstützung benötigen.

"Wenn ein Passagier ohne negatives Testergebnis vor dem Abflug in England ankommt, wird er mit einer Geldstrafe belegt", sagte Courts.

"Wir werden die internationalen Reisevorschriften dahingehend ändern, dass gegen nicht konforme Passagiere Bußgelder ab 500 GBP erhoben werden können."

(tagsToTranslate) Dailymail (t) Nachrichten (t) Coronavirus (t) Downing Street (t) Nachrichten und Aktualisierungen der britischen Regierung zum britischen Kabinett (t) SAGE (t) Boris Johnson