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Kate Middleton meets with parents supported by peer support networks during the Covid-19 pandemic


Kate Middleton looked relaxed as she recycled her pink M&S pants for £ 29.50 to meet with parents who were supported by peer support networks today during the Covid-19 pandemic.

The Duchess of Cambridge, 38, lived at her home in Comments Hall in Norfolk during the lockdown but is now back in London, at Kensington Palace, with Prince William, 38, and their children Prince George, six, Princess Charlotte, five and Prince Louis, two.

Kate was effortlessly elegant as she joined her fellow parents in the capital this morning, opting for a plain white t-shirt, and putting her pink M&S suit pants back on for the visit.

The Duchess was greeted in the autumn sunshine at the picturesque Old English Garden in Battersea Park, where she was spoke to the mothers, whose children were in strollers when they sat socially distant on wooden park benches.

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Kate Middleton (center pictured with multiple parents) looked relaxed as she recycled her £ 29.50 worth of pink M&S pants to meet with parents who were peer-supported today during the Covid-19 pandemic Networks were supported

The mother of three (pictured) was effortlessly elegant when she joined the fellow parents in London this morning

Kate opted for a plain white t-shirt and wore her pink M&S suit pants again for the visit

The mother of three (pictured) was effortlessly elegant as she joined the co-parents in London this morning, opting for a plain white t-shirt and putting her pink M&S suit pants back on for the visit

The Duchess was greeted in the autumn sunshine at the picturesque Old English Garden in Battersea Park, where she spoke to the mothers and entertained their children (pictured)

The Duchess was greeted in the autumn sunshine at the picturesque Old English Garden in Battersea Park, where she spoke to the mothers and entertained their children (pictured)

Kate in the picture lived at her home in Comments Hall in Norfolk during the lockdown but is now back in London, at Kensington Palace, with Prince William, 38, and their children, Prince George (six), Princess Charlotte (five) and Prince Louis (two)

Kate in the picture lived at her home in Comments Hall in Norfolk during the lockdown but is now back in London, at Kensington Palace, with Prince William, 38, and their children, Prince George (six), Princess Charlotte (five) and Prince Louis (two)

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She looked perfect, wore her hair in her signature blow dryer and kept her makeup neutral for the event. The queen swapped her usual heels for a pair of comfortable sneakers and looked relaxed as she stepped out into the autumn sun to meet up with other parents.

Chatting to parents supported by various peer groups such as Home-Start, National Childbirth Trust (NCT) and Mush, the Duchess heard how they had struggled to meet during the Covid-19 lockdown but continued to zoom in and make regular phone calls.

Home volunteers give parents thousands of hours of help solving problems such as postnatal depression, isolation, and grief.

Single mothers Irma Martus, 47, and Carol Elliott, 41, told the Duchess how they had been helped with weekly check-up phone calls from voluntary Home-Start Wandsworth during the pandemic.

A survey found that two-thirds of mothers aren't sure they can achieve proper mental health and that many are unable to speak to family doctors or their families during the pandemic.

Kate said, “Does it help emotionally too? Do you feel less judged? Everyone must have these friendships. & # 39; Add: & # 39; It must be difficult to meet socially distant. & # 39;

Afterward, Irma, who was referred to Home-Start after her 22-month-old son Emmanuel was diagnosed with Down syndrome, said: "She said she has a passion for helping single mothers through peer support."

The Duchess (pictured) chatted with parents who were supported by various peer groups - such as Home-Start, National Childbirth Trust (NCT) and Mush

She heard how they had struggled to meet during the Covid-19 lockdown

The Duchess (pictured) chatted to parents supported by various peer groups such as Home-Start, National Childbirth Trust (NCT) and Mush, and heard how they had struggled during the Covid-19 lockdown, to meet

Kate (center) swapped her usual heels for a pair of comfortable sneakers and looked relaxed as she stepped into the autumn sun to meet other parents

Kate (center) swapped her usual heels for a pair of comfortable sneakers and looked relaxed as she stepped into the autumn sun to meet other parents

The Duchess of Cambridge (pictured left) wore her hair in her signature blow dryer and kept her makeup neutral for today's event in London's Park

The Duchess of Cambridge (pictured left) wore her hair in her signature blow dryer and kept her makeup neutral for today's event in London's Park

Among the groups Kate heard about in the picture was Home-Start, whose volunteer parents give thousands of hours of help coping with issues like postnatal depression, isolation, and grief

Kate grins as she talks to her parents in the London park

Among the groups Kate heard about in the picture was Home-Start, whose volunteer parents give thousands of hours of help coping with issues like postnatal depression, isolation, and grief

Carol said, "I said my volunteer calls me every week and you feel like a real friend and she said everyone needs friends."

The Duchess also met mothers Nalini Sadai and Jessie Brett, who provide peer-to-peer mother support for the National Childbirth Trust. They both told her they were using their own experiences to help new mothers.

Kate said, “It's good to be able to listen and be heard while unprepared. It's so important to your emotional wellbeing. With your experience, it's so important that you went through it. Without what you provide, this type of relationship, you can feel so isolated. You should be very proud. & # 39;

Christine Thatai, 37, and Morgan Cassius, 29, told the Duchess they made Zoom calls to other mothers every day at 11 a.m. through an app called Mush.

Kate took off her sunglasses and smiled at Morgan's six-month-old daughter, Makena-Grace. Morgan said afterward, "I said your ban was difficult because I couldn't go swimming or meet friends who were just inside with the television." Christine said, "Kate was very interested in how we made friends."

Prior to the visit, the Duchess (pictured with a smile on one of the children at the event) made a video call to eight organizations to discuss helping parents with young children

Prior to the visit, the Duchess (pictured with a smile on one of the children at the event) made a video call to eight organizations to discuss helping parents with young children

Meanwhile, in the park, Kate (pictured) was told how peer groups struggled during the Covid-19 lockdown and the importance of outdoor access to their health and wellbeing

Meanwhile, in the park, Kate (pictured) was told how peer groups struggled during the Covid-19 lockdown and the importance of outdoor access to their health and wellbeing

Peer-to-peer supporters can range from paid professionals and trained volunteers to more informal parenting networks. In the picture Kate in the Park of London

Kate opted for a plain white t-shirt for her outing (pictured)

Peer-to-peer supporters can range from paid professionals and trained volunteers to more informal parenting networks. In the picture Kate in the Park of London

The Duchess had previously made a video call to eight organizations to discuss helping parents with young children.

Kate said, “I wish you all kudos. I know there are a large team of you in churches across the country. Both William and I hear how important these relationships are to families – they are a real lifeline. Well done for you and your army of volunteers out there. Like you, I would like to see peer-to-peer support become more embedded and celebrated in communities and society as a whole. & # 39;

NCT's Sarah McMullan, who attended the conference call, said, "It was great for the Duchess to put mental health issues in the spotlight and show how peer support can make a difference."

According to a lockdown survey conducted by Home-Start UK, Best Beginnings and Parent-Infant Foundation during COVID-19, only about 3 in 10 parents (32 percent) were confident they could find mental health help if they needed it. And 4 in 10 (38 percent) pregnant respondents were concerned about getting reliable information and advice about pregnancy.

Home-Start has been supporting parents for 47 years. It provides a local community of trained volunteers and expert support for families with young children. The organization provides 13,500 volunteer home visitors to more than 27,000 families and 56,000 children across the UK.

The Duchess of Cambridge (pictured with one of the mothers) spends the day learning about the importance of parenting initiatives in Battersea Park, London

The Duchess of Cambridge (pictured with one of the mothers) spends the day learning about the importance of parenting initiatives in Battersea Park, London

A beaming Duchess of Cambridge listens to parents as they tell her about their struggles during the lockdown

The Duchess had previously made a video call to eight organizations to discuss helping parents with young children

A beaming Duchess of Cambridge listens to parents as they tell her about their struggles during the lockdown. The Duchess had previously made a video call to eight organizations to discuss helping parents with young children

The Duchess (pictured with one of the mothers) also met mothers Nalini Sadai and Jessie Brett, who provide peer-to-peer mother support for the National Childbirth Trust. They both told her they were using their own experiences to help new mothers

The Duchess (pictured with one of the mothers) also met mothers Nalini Sadai and Jessie Brett, who provide peer-to-peer mother support for the National Childbirth Trust. They both told her they were using their own experiences to help new mothers

Single mothers Irma Martus, 47, and Carol Elliott, 41, told the Duchess (pictured with one of the parents) how they were helped with weekly check-up calls from voluntary home starter Wandsworth during the pandemic

Single mothers Irma Martus, 47, and Carol Elliott, 41, told the Duchess (pictured with one of the parents) how they were helped with weekly check-up calls from voluntary home starter Wandsworth during the pandemic

Over 200 local, independent home start-ups work in more than two thirds of the country. The volunteers can help with postnatal depression, isolation, physical health problems, and grief. They spend about two hours a week in a family home, supporting them in the ways they need.

Home-Start also organizes day trips and Christmas parties and helps with access to local services. Peer-to-peer supporters can range from paid professionals and trained volunteers to more informal parenting networks.

Kate's visit today comes after she joined Prince William to highlight how the congregations were doing in Covid-19 in London last week.

The Duke and Duchess traveled to London Bridge and Whitechapel last week, where they celebrated the traditions of London's East End by making Jewish bagel snacks and meeting with Muslim volunteers who supported the community during the coronavirus outbreak.

The couple, who had not appeared in public together since July, looked relaxed during the excursion and wanted to shed light on individuals and companies that did everything they could to help others during the pandemic.

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