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Junk food TV advertising is prohibited before the watershed at 9 p.m.


Junk food television advertising will be banned before 9:00 p.m. as part of Boris Johnson's anti-obesity campaign

  • Prime Minister Boris Johnson will present a new strategy against obesity next week
  • His weight could have helped fight death after becoming infected with Covid-19
  • A ban on online junk food advertising and a ban on television advertising are also expected
  • Restrictions on supermarket offerings are also expected

Television advertising for junk food is to be banned before the watershed at 9 p.m. as part of Boris Johnson's war on obesity.

The Prime Minister will present a new strategy against obesity next week after being warned that his weight may have contributed to his death when he contracted coronavirus this year.

According to the Financial Times, retail and advertising managers should ban television ads for junk food like burgers and chocolate before 9 p.m. A ban on online advertising is also expected, as well as restrictions on supermarket offers where you can only buy one.

But the industry struck back on plans and said the move wasn't necessary. Stephen Woodford, executive director of the Advertising Association, said the UK already has the "world's strictest rules for advertising" for high-fat and salty foods.

"They limit the exposure of under 16s to advertising. Especially children see much less advertising for this type of food," he told Times Radio.

“In fact, the evidence for the direct link between advertising and obesity is pretty weak. If you look around the world … (Marketing agency) McKinsey has carried out a large study in which all different factors have been examined (and). I think it was 14th on the list of factors that affect obesity in both children and adults.

& # 39; There are much more effective measures to combat obesity and reduce obesity.

"It is fairly easy to demand something that can be most visibly reduced or restricted – it is already severely restricted and further restrictions are not enough."

Mr. Johnson previously spoke out against curbs for junk food. When celebrity chef Jamie Oliver campaigned to improve school meals in 2006, he said: "If I had the say, I would get rid of Jamie Oliver and tell people to eat what they want."

However, an obesity activist suggested that his own treatment with coronavirus – which is said to be more serious for overweight patients – changed his mind.

National Obesity Forum's Tam Fry told the BBC's Today Program: "I think his experience at St. Thomas's Hospital has really changed the game, and I think that was why he suddenly turned up for it committed to curing obesity.

"He knows very well that his weight was a big problem when they treated him."

Boris Johnson in May in his running gear on Downing Street. He is said to have been shocked by the effects of his weight on his fight against the coronavirus

The Prime Minister (pictured yesterday) will unveil a new strategy against obesity next week after being warned that his weight may have contributed to his death when he contracted coronavirus this year

The Prime Minister (pictured yesterday) will unveil a new strategy against obesity next week after being warned that his weight may have contributed to his death when he contracted coronavirus this year

Boris Johnson in 2006

Jamie Oliver

In 2006, when he was shadow college minister, Mr. Johnson took part in Jamie Oliver's campaign for healthier school meals and told the Tory party conference, "If I had the say, I would get rid of Jamie Oliver and tell people to eat what they do like to eat. & # 39;

The Prime Minister has ruled out the introduction of new "sin taxes" such as the sugar tax on soft drinks. However, he is considering new labeling laws that should make it considerably easier for people to avoid products that are high in fat and salt.

It is also expected that Mr. Johnson will launch a major campaign to encourage people to walk and cycle, with millions going into building new bike paths.

Obesity is a major risk factor in coronavirus patients, with obesity having to be treated or even dying much more often in the hospital. Diabetes is also known to be a major risk.

The prime minister, who is now on a diet, is said to have been shocked that his own 17-stone weight could have taken him to the intensive care unit when he received Covid-19.

Retailers and advertisers have been informed that the plans include a ban on television advertising for junk food such as burgers and chocolate before 9 p.m. (file image).

Retailers and advertisers have been informed that the plans include a ban on television advertising for junk food such as burgers and chocolate before 9 p.m. (file image).

He is said to be "obsessed" with the topic and to say to the helpers: "Everything is fine for you, thin one." The prime minister, previously skeptical of nanny state interventions against obesity, has now decided that a weight war must be launched this summer to help people lose weight before a possible second wave of the virus this winter.

Last month, he said, "We'll be happier, fitter, and more resistant to diseases like Covid if we can fight obesity."

But every move is likely to be controversial – and would do a heavy blow to commercial broadcasters, which were already hit by a dramatic drop in sales this year as a result of the recession triggered by the blockade.

Downing Street declined to comment last night.

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