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JK Rowling is again accused of transphobia


JK Rowling is embroiled in yet another trans franchise after it was revealed that the villain in her latest book is a male serial killer who dresses up as a woman in order to kill his victims.

Troubled Blood – written under Rowling's pseudonym Robert Galbraith – is expected to be released on September 15th. Detective Cormoran Strike will find out what happened to the missing GP Margot Bamborough.

He fears she fell victim to Dennis Creed, known as a "transvestite serial killer" for murdering his victims in female clothing.

An early review of The Daily Telegraph's 900-page book – in which the critics seem to be the "moral of the book: Never trust a man in a dress" – immediately sparked an online backlash.

Furious reviewers rushed to Twitter to share their thoughts and started the #RIPJKRowling trend in the UK.

Others said the book – which won't be released until Tuesday – is not transphobic at all, and overzealous critics should read it before reaching any conclusions.

Observer journalist Nick Cohen wrote, “I read the latest Strike novel and the claim that it is against transsexuals sucks.

Troubled Blood is under Rowling's pseudonym Robert Galbraith

JK Rowling (left) is embroiled in yet another trans franchise after it was revealed that the villain in her latest book Troubled Blood (right) is a male serial killer who dresses up as a woman in order to kill his victims

“I can't tell you why it sucks without revealing the ending. So, until you've read it for yourself, what you should, you just have to trust me: this sucks. & # 39;

One Twitter user named Steve responded by saying, “But when you combine it with all of the negative stereotypes she's made about trans women, the pattern is clear.

"It's not anti-trans as such, but it plays with fears that trans women are CIS men who want to spy on women."

Cohen replied, "Read the bloody book, why don't you go?"

Piers Morgan added, "The fact that #RIPJKRowling is on trend says everything you need to know about the bright brigade – they are more wicked and wickedly intolerant than anyone they preach about."

In June, the Harry Potter writer made headlines after mocking an online article that used the words "people who menstruate" instead of "women".

Observer journalist Nick Cohen wrote, "I read the latest Strike novel and the claim that it is anti-trans sucks."

Observer journalist Nick Cohen wrote, "I read the latest Strike novel and the claim that it is anti-trans sucks."

Piers Morgan added, "The fact that #RIPJKRowling is on trend says everything you need to know about the bright brigade - they are more wicked and viciously intolerant than anyone they preach about."

Piers Morgan added, "The fact that #RIPJKRowling is on trend says everything you need to know about the bright brigade – they are more wicked and viciously intolerant than anyone they preach about."

She was hit by what she termed "relentless attacks" after she wrote, "I'm sure there was a word for these people before. Somebody help me. Wumben? Wimpund? Woomud?"

The acclaimed writer then penned a deeply personal essay to address the controversy. She revealed that she was sexually assaulted in her twenties and said she still felt the scars of "domestic violence" in her first marriage.

Rowling's remarks sparked a backlash from a number of stars including Rupert, Emma Watson, who played Hermione in the film franchise, Daniel Radcliffe, who played Harry, and Eddie Redmayne, who starred in her Fantastic Beasts films.

But actor Robbie Coltrane, who played Rubeus Hagrid in the films, told the Radio Times, "I don't think what she said was really offensive."

"I don't know why, but there is a whole generation of Twitter people waiting to be offended.

He added, "I talk like a grumpy old man but you just think," Oh, get over yourself. "

Cormoran Strike – the fifth book in the series – is published by Sphere, a reprint of the Little, Brown Book Group.

The Little Brown Book Group is owned by Hachette, one of several publishers involved in Miss Rowling's children's book The Ickabog.

In June, some of those involved in The Ickabog are said to have staged their own rebellion during a heated meeting.

JK Rowling with first husband Jorge Arantes in 1999. She explained why she is embroiled in a bitter Twitter dispute with activists seeking greater rights for men and women who change gender, referring to her experience domestic violence during her first marriage to Jorge Arantes

JK Rowling with first husband Jorge Arantes in 1999. She shared on her experience of being embroiled in a bitter argument on Twitter with activists seeking greater rights for men and women who change gender domestic violence during her first marriage to Jorge Arantes

JK Rowling pictured with Rupert Grint, Daniel Radcliffe and Emma Watson in 2001

JK Rowling pictured with Rupert Grint, Daniel Radcliffe and Emma Watson in 2001

THE VERY WOKE PUBLISHING HOUSE JK ROWLING WORKED ITS MAGIC AFTER HARRY POTTER

JK Rowling published all seven of her Harry Potter novels – as well as spin-offs – with the British publisher Bloomsbury.

But she broke away from the London-based company when she embarked on her foray into adult books and scripts.

Her first adult book, The Casual Vacancy, was published by Little, Brown Book Group.

Her Cormoran Strike series, which she wrote under the pseudonym Robert Galbraith, was also published with the group – as was the screenplay for the global phenomenon Harry Potter and the Cursed Child.

The Little Brown Book Group is owned by Hachette, one of several publishers involved in Miss Rowling's new children's book, The Ickabog.

The group has published a variety of feminist literature over the years, including a children's book entitled “Feminist Baby! He's a feminist too! & # 39;

The group, whose staff threatened to shut down tools in protest of Rowling's views on gender, also published a book by Titania McGrath called Woke.

Rowling was undoubtedly a success for Little, Brown Book Group – and therefore for Hachette.

The Casual Vacancy was a huge success. The book sold 125,000 copies in the first week.

The first novel in their Cormoran Strike series, The Cuckoo’s Calling, received critical acclaim before the actual author was exposed.

When Rowling was introduced, sales soared a staggering 156,866% in just one day.

The book sold 17,662 times in six days in 2013.

The screenplay of the global hit play Harry Potter and the Cursed Child sold more than 680,000 in three days after it was also released by the group.

The numbers broke the record for the largest weeklong title sales in the decade.

A source said, “The staff at the children's department in Hachette announced that they are no longer ready to work on the book.

They said they were against their comments and wanted to show support for the trans lobby. These coworkers are all very “woken up”, mostly in their twenties and early thirties, and it seems that this is an issue that is very close to their hearts. "

Another insider said: “There were a handful of employees and they are entitled to their views. Of course, if they were asked to publish a book on domestic abuse and they were a domestic abuse survivor, they would never be forced to work on it. But this is a children's fairy tale. It's not the end of the world. They will all chat with their managers. "

Hachette is the parent company of Virago Press, a London-based company that publishes women's and feminist books. Notable published authors include Maya Angelou, Beatrix Campbell, and Angela Carter.

Then, in August, it became known that Hodder Education, part of Hachette, was inviting a transgender activist group to process a court report on a free speech decision.

The legal article writer said it was "effectively destroyed" based on extensive feedback from the Trans Rights Charity Mermaids.

The move by Hodder Education, part of Hachette, resulted in Ian Yule stepping down as editor-in-chief of the A-Level Law Review magazine, for which the article was written.

Mr Yule's article was a summary of a case in which the police were compared to the Gestapo or the Stasi for their response to the allegation that 55-year-old businessman Harry Miller had posted transphobic tweets.

Officials went to his place of work to tell him about the tweets – including one that said, “I was assigned a mammal at birth but my orientation is fish. Don't Specify Wrong – Registered as a "non-criminal hate incident" following a single complaint in 2019.

The February ruling by Supreme Court Justice Julian Knowles found that the force's actions were "a disproportionate interference" with Mr Miller's right to freedom of expression and that his tweets were "legitimate".

However, the chiefs of Hodder Education felt that readers of the court report might find him "offensive" and referred him to Mermaids, according to The Sunday Times.

The charity was asked "to suggest examples that we can use to counter the tone and opinions in the play" and to suggest changes to "anything you think is untrue, unfair and / or offensive".

The Mermaid Politician reportedly responded with four typed feedback pages saying the article was unbalanced.

The publisher is said to have already deleted two thirds of the original article because it “had to be very careful about how we present certain views”.

Mr. Yule, 72, said: “This article contained little or no comment from me and no comments on transgenderism.

"My article did not express my own thoughts or beliefs, but was a direct and accurate account of a High Court judgment."

Mr Yule said the editor's behavior was "well beyond parody," adding, "If the judgment of a distinguished high court judge is likely to upset such students and their teachers, they have nothing to do with studying or studying that subject to teach."

JK Rowling in 2002 with Emma Watson and Bonnie Wright who decided to add fuel to the firing hours, according to the author

JK Rowling in 2002 with Emma Watson and Bonnie Wright who decided to add fuel to the firing hours, according to the author

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