ENTERTAINMENT

James Bond-style Cold War devices are being auctioned in New York


A James Bond-style device for sale in a New York auction is a lipstick gun titled "Kiss of Death" and a wallet with a hidden camera.

Most of the devices were used by the Soviet Union and its comrades in the Cold War against the USA and look like they came from the imagination of author Ian Fleming from "From Russia, with Love".

The Californian auction house Julien & # 39; s will sell around 400 lots – online and then in person from mid-January to February 13, 2021.

The highlights include the lipstick-like gun, valued at up to $ 1,200. A wiretapping bug in the hotel room from 1964 valued at $ 500 and the wallet from the 1950s with a hidden Leica camera valued at $ 3,500.

The "Kiss of Death" pistol, which is supposed to look like a tube of lipstick, is valued at $ 1,200 and is designed to fire a single shot of a 0.177-caliber bullet – most likely in the bedroom. It was issued to agents of the KGB and this example was obtained in 1965 during a random border control between East and West Germany

An original Soviet KGB Fialka (M-125-3M) or & # 39; Violet & # 39; encryption machine used to encode and decode secret messages during the Cold War, valued at $ 8,000 to $ 12,000. The device uses 10 rotors each with 30 contacts and mechanical pins to control the step. The Fialka has a tape reader on the right and a punch and print mechanism on the left. This model, the M-125-3MN, had different writing wheels for Latin and Cyrillic text

An original Soviet KGB Fialka (M-125-3M) or & # 39; Violet & # 39; encryption machine used to encode and decode secret messages during the Cold War, valued at $ 8,000 to $ 12,000. The device uses 10 rotors with 30 contacts each and mechanical pins to control the step. The Fialka has a tape reader on the right and a punch and print mechanism on the left. This model, the M-125-3MN, had different writing wheels for Latin and Cyrillic text

One of the first transistorized stationary microphone listening devices or "bugs" with an adjustable frequency, circa 1964, valued at $ 500. The antenna can be seen on the left, the microphone filter on the left, frequency locking screws in the middle and an external power source connected to the two pins on the right. At only three inches, the circuit is very simple with a single transistor, coil, and a few passive components

One of the first transistorized stationary microphone listening devices or "bugs" with an adjustable frequency, circa 1964, valued at $ 500. The antenna can be seen on the left, the microphone filter on the left, frequency locking screws in the middle and an external power source connected to the two pins on the right. At only three inches, the circuit is very simple with a single transistor, coil, and a few passive components

A replica of the type of umbrella believed to have been used in the infamous murder of Bulgarian writer Georgie Markov, valued at around $ 3,000. The dissident writer was murdered in London in September 1978 with a microfabricated pellet of ricin that was shot in his leg from an umbrella carried by someone from the Bulgarian secret service

A replica of the type of umbrella believed to have been used in the infamous murder of Bulgarian writer Georgie Markov, valued at around $ 3,000. The dissident writer was murdered in London in September 1978 with a microfabricated pellet of ricin that was shot in his leg from an umbrella carried by someone from the Bulgarian secret service

A Soviet KGB spy bag known as "The Fly" used by female employees to hold a hidden FED camera - its value is estimated at $ 3,500. The camera - absolutely tiny for its time - was capable of taking very high resolution images so information could be executed and targets identified

A Soviet KGB spy bag known as "The Fly" used by female employees to hold a hidden FED camera – its value is estimated at $ 3,500. The camera – absolutely tiny for its time – was capable of taking very high resolution images so information could be executed and targets could be identified

An emblem in the shape of a bow tie on the side of the wallet pops up to allow the camera to take a picture - hence the name of the item & # 39; The Fly & # 39 ;.

An emblem in the shape of a bow tie on the side of the wallet pops up to allow the camera to take a picture – hence the name of the item & # 39; The Fly & # 39 ;.

A rare steel wire pen believed to have been made and used by the Soviet espionage agency GRU

A rare steel wire pen believed to have been made and used by the Soviet espionage agency GRU

Stabbed in the leg with an umbrella, the death of Georgie Markov

On the afternoon of September 7, 1978, Bulgarian dissident writer Georgie Markov was arrested while crossing the south side of Waterloo Bridge in London.

As he pushed through the crowds near a bus stop, he felt a sharp stab in his left thigh.

When he turns around, he sees a man reaching for a fumbled umbrella.

"I'm sorry," says the man with a heavy accent.

A moment later a taxi stopped and he got in and left.

He died three days later – injected with the poison ricin from the umbrella.

At the time, Markov was working for the BBC.

The prime suspect, Francesco Gullino – known by his code name "Piccadilly" – was questioned by the British police in 1993 but was later released.

A 2006 Channel Five documentary, The Umbrella Assassin, revealed that Piccadilly was safe and sound.

The items were recently on display at the KGB Spy Museum in Manhattan, New York – a private museum that opened by Lithuanian historian Julius Urbaitis in January 2019 and has closed due to the coronavirus pandemic.

The lipstick gun was designed to single-shot a 0.177 caliber bullet, which was most likely fired by honey trap agents in the bedroom.

Its existence was discovered in 1965 during an accidental border control between East and West Germany.

Other items include a rare Soviet version of the Enigma code encryption machine known as Fialka ("Violet") with an estimate of $ 8,000 to $ 12,000.

The replica of the syringe umbrella that is believed to have murdered Bulgarian dissident author Georgie Markov is valued at around $ 3,000.

He was murdered in September 1978 after a pellet containing ricin was shot in his leg from an umbrella carried by someone connected to Bulgarian intelligence on London's Waterloo Bridge.

It has been speculated that the KGB was providing support.

A 1,000 pound carved stone sculpture of Soviet leader Vladimir Lenin that stood at the KGB headquarters in Kaliningrad is valued at $ 7,000.

A machine that border guards use to track down people hiding in vehicles could fetch $ 1,200.

A WWII Nazi phone faucet device is valued at $ 2,500, while an original steel door from a former KGB prison hospital could cost $ 700.

A vintage railroad warning sign "Infected Area" is worth $ 150.

The Cuban Missile Crisis in October 1962 was a seismic moment in Cold War history when the threat of war emerged during the tense 13-day conflict between the United States and the Soviet Union over the installation of nuclear-armed Soviet missiles in Cuba.

A 1000 pound bust of Vladimir Lenin hand carved from white stone. The bust stood on the grounds of the KGB headquarters in Kaliningrad, but was eventually segregated across the border into Latvia. The value is $ 7,000

A 1000 pound bust of Vladimir Lenin hand carved from white stone. The bust stood on the grounds of the KGB headquarters in Kaliningrad, but was eventually segregated across the border into Latvia. The value is $ 7,000

A device called the & # 39; Lavanda-M & # 39 ;, built in 1986, was designed to determine if people were hiding in vehicles. The device used by the KGB at checkpoints and border crossings was able to detect the types of vibrations and micro-movements caused by heartbeat, breathing and muscle contractions. All of these signals travel through the air at less than 20 Hz and are not picked up by the human ear. The original logbook is included with the device, which shows when it was used

A device called the "Lavanda-M", built in 1986, was developed to determine if people were hiding in vehicles. The device used by the KGB at checkpoints and border crossings was able to detect the types of vibrations and micro-movements caused by heartbeat, breathing and muscle contractions. All of these signals travel through the air at less than 20 Hz and are not picked up by the human ear. The original logbook is included with the device, which shows when it was used

A Soviet "infected" enameled skull sign from the 1950s or 60s. These signs were used along the railway lines to indicate to the crew and passengers that they were crossing a radioactive sector, chemical attack zone, or diseased area

A Soviet "infected" enameled skull sign from the 1950s or 60s. These signs were used along the railway lines to indicate to the crew and passengers that they were crossing a radioactive sector, chemical attack zone, or diseased area

A replica of the type of umbrella believed to have been used to carry out the infamous assassination attempt on Bulgarian author Georgie Markov

An original steel door for room number 13 from a former KGB prison hospital

A replica of the type of umbrella that is believed to have carried out the infamous murder of Bulgarian writer Georgie Markov (left) and an original steel door for room 13 of a former KGB prison hospital. While in custody, inmates were known to deliberately harm themselves, so they were taken to the infirmary, where they believed the food would be better and the ability to communicate with the outside world easier, when it wasn't Case was. The door contains an upper beamed viewing window and a lower opening for removing the prisoner's handcuffs

A replica of the type of umbrella believed to have been used in the infamous 1978 murder of Bulgarian writer Georgie Markov on Waterloo Bridge in London

A replica of the type of umbrella believed to have been used in the infamous 1978 murder of Bulgarian writer Georgie Markov on Waterloo Bridge in London

A Soviet KGB spy gun used by female staff that looks like a tube of lipstick

A Soviet KGB spy gun used by female staff that looks like a tube of lipstick

Hundreds of pieces, some of which have never been seen at auction, tell the story of the island nation 90 miles from the US, its struggles and uprisings against its government in 1959, led by Cuban revolutionaries Fidel Castro and Ernesto & # 39 ; Che & # 39; Guevara.

Highlights include Che Guevara's $ 1,000-1,500 high school diploma and a signed letter from Fidel Castro in 1958 about plans to infiltrate the capital, Havana, valued at $ 1,000-1,500.

Auctioneer Darren Julien said, “These extraordinary items, taken from the secret archives and vaults of the United States, Russia and Cuba, will add tremendous value to any world-class museum collection.

"These breathtaking objects offer a fascinating look at the geopolitical, economic and cultural upheavals of this period, the effects of which are being looked up more than ever in this election year."

The inside of the camera bag known as "The Fly"

The inside of the camera bag known as "The Fly"

An original Soviet KGB Fialka (M-125-3M) or "Violet" cipher machine that was used to encode and decode secret messages during the Cold War

An original Soviet KGB Fialka (M-125-3M) or "Violet" cipher machine that was used to encode and decode secret messages during the Cold War

One of the first transistorized stationary microphone listening devices or "bugs" with adjustable frequency, around 1964

One of the first transistorized stationary microphone listening devices or "bugs" with adjustable frequency, around 1964

(tagsToTranslate) Dailymail (t) News (t) California