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Jack Dorsey warns Trump against losing protection from a Twitter ban if he leaves office


Jack Dorsey said Tuesday that Donald Trump's tweets will no longer be protected after his absence and suggested that he could be booted from the platform in January.

"We have a policy in the area of ​​public interest in which we make exceptions for the world's leading companies whether – if a tweet violates our terms of use, we leave it open," explained Dorsey a policy that is between normal users and users distinguishes president.

"So when an account is no longer world leader, that particular policy disappears," he said when asked about social media transparency at a Senate Justice hearing on Tuesday.

Dorsey stated during his Question Time with Democratic Senator Mazie Hirono that even if the world leaders' tweets violate Twitter's Terms of Service, their sharing capabilities will remain open.

"Will he still be able to use your platforms to spread disinformation?" Asked Hirono.

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg, who was also asked to answer questions related to Big Tech's handling of information, revealed that his website also has a slightly different handling of accounts for politicians compared to the general public.

"Regarding President Trump and the future, there are a small number of guidelines where we have exceptions for politicians, based on the principle that people should be able to hear what their elected officials – and candidates for office – are saying," said he.

Jack Dorsey, CEO of Twitter, said during a hearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Tuesday that Donald Trump could be booted from Twitter and his tweets removed once he is no longer protected by guidelines that apply to world leaders

"We have a public interest policy where we make exceptions for the world's leading companies. If a tweet violates our Terms of Use, we leave it open," said Dorsey. "So when an account … is no longer a world leader, that particular policy goes away."

While Trump's tweet stating that he is the real winner and questions the integrity of the elections has not been removed or hidden, Twitter has tagged dozens of these election-related posts

While Trump's tweet stating that he is the real winner and questions the integrity of the elections has not been removed or hidden, Twitter has tagged dozens of these election-related posts

Facebook's Mark Zuckerberg, who also attended Tuesday's hearing, was beaten up by senators for evading questions

Facebook's Mark Zuckerberg, who also attended Tuesday's hearing, was beaten up by senators for evading questions

Senator Josh Hawley hit Twitter claiming Zuckerberg only replied with "I don't know" and "Let me get back to you".

Senator Josh Hawley hit Twitter claiming Zuckerberg only replied with "I don't know" and "Let me get back to you".

Unlike Dorsey, however, Zuckerberg said there are no exceptions to her rules for world leaders or other politicians.

The Facebook boss was also targeted by senators for evading questions.

Often, Zuckerberg replied to the senators that he either could not remember a particular instance or that he should turn to the members of the panel about a particular investigation.

"Mark Zuckerberg today under oath to me: I don't know, I can't remember, I don't remember, I'll follow up later, let me get back to you," lamented Republican Senator from Missouri Josh Hawley on Twitter.

Dorsey announced Tuesday that Twitter flagged 300,000 tweets to tackle disinformation in the days surrounding this year's presidential election.

& # 39; More than a year ago the public asked us to provide additional context to make potentially misleading information more apartment. We did just that, putting labels on over 300,000 tweets from October 27 to November 11, which is about 0.2 percent of the tweets voted in the US, ”Dorsey said during a hearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Tuesday.

Of the marked tweets, 456 were also covered by a warning message and restricted in their release functions. Approximately 74 percent of people who viewed these Tweets were only able to view them if they chose to after a label or warning was posted.

"We put labels on to broaden the context and limit the risk of harmful electoral misinformation being spread without important context because the public told us to take these steps," he added in his opening address.

Dorsey preemptively addressed questions that were sure to come up on Twitter, flagging dozens of tweets from President Donald Trump related to the election – especially those questioning the results.

During Tuesday's hearing, Dorsey also announced that Twitter had reported more than 300,000 tweets related to the 2020 presidential election in the days before and after

During Tuesday's hearing, Dorsey also announced that Twitter had reported more than 300,000 tweets related to the 2020 presidential election in the days before and after

Dorsey and Mark Zuckberg, CEO of Facebook, attended another hearing related to Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, which prevents their companies from being held responsible for their users' contributions

Dorsey and Mark Zuckberg, CEO of Facebook, attended another hearing related to Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, which prevents their companies from being held responsible for their users' contributions

Lindsey Graham, chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee, said in his inaugural address, "Section 230 as it exists today must give" and added, "Changes will come."

Lindsey Graham, chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee, said in his inaugural address, "Section 230 as it exists today must give" and added, "Changes will come."

In Chairman Lindsey Graham's opening address, he featured a tweet from Trump's former Ambassador to the United Nations, Nikki Haley, questioning the validity of postal ballot papers that Twitter had flagged as misleading.

It also featured a tweet by Iranian leader Ayatollah Khamenei denying the Holocaust, which was unmarked.

The biggest social media giants traveled again – practically – to Capitol Hill on Tuesday to testify and ask questions about Section 230, while Republicans lament Facebook and Twitter for selectively censoring conservative voices.

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg and Twitter's Jack Dorsey faced verbal assaults from lawmakers as Democrats focused on amplifying misinformation on their platforms and Republicans focused on suppressing some of their biggest voices – including President Trump.

"Section 230 as it exists today has to exist," said Graham, adding, "a change is coming."

Democratic Senator Richard Blumenthal, who virtually attended the hearing, agreed that the view of social media in the eyes of the law needs to be revised.

Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act protects social media platforms like Facebook and Twitter from being held responsible for what their users post – and instead acts as a third party for the publication of speeches.

However, these tech giants have implemented guidelines in which they will moderate what content is allowed and review certain posts even if they do not contain threatening jargon.

Zuckerberg insisted that Facebook's steps to stop the spread of misinformation didn't go as far as some Democrats want because it doesn't want to argue the truth – and further distances itself from protecting Section 230 to lose.

"We created this independent fact-checking program where we partnered with 80+ partners around the world to support fact-checking as people in our community have told us they don't want to see misinformation , But also not." I don't want us to decide what is true and what is wrong, "said Zuckerberg during his questioning of Dianne Feinstein, a member of the judiciary's ranking.

The senators are deeply divided from the party over the integrity and results of the election itself.

Prominent Republican senators have refused to put down Trump's claims of electoral irregularities and fraud as misinformation denying Biden's victory flourished online.

Trump said he won Pennsylvania because ballots were banned. Twitter pointed out, "Several sources called this election differently."

Trump said he won Pennsylvania because ballots were banned. Twitter pointed out, "Several sources called this election differently."

They marked other tweets from Trump claiming "widespread electoral fraud" with, "This claim of electoral fraud is controversial."

They marked other tweets from Trump claiming "widespread electoral fraud" with, "This claim of electoral fraud is controversial."

Graham, a close ally of Trump, has publicly urged, “Don't admit it, Mr. President. Fight hard. & # 39;

Zuckerberg and Dorsey promised lawmakers last month to aggressively protect their platforms from tampering by foreign governments or incite violence against election results – and they followed with high-profile moves that angered Trump and his supporters.

Twitter and Facebook have both mislabeled some of Trump's information, particularly his claims linking the email voting to fraud.

On Monday, Twitter reported Trump's tweet saying "I won the election!" with the note: "Official sources called this election differently."

Facebook has also taken steps to stop the spread of election-related misinformation, including banning the Stop the Steal group, which has grown to 350,000 users in less than a day.

The group included Trump supporters organizing protests against continued vote counting, which extended Biden's lead in the days after the election.

The large group, organized through Facebook, reiterated Trump's allegations of a rigged election that invalidated the results.

While the group was being shut down, copycat groups & # 39; Stop the Steal & # 39; on Facebook, and as of Monday, the social media platform seemed to have made it harder to find.

DEMOCRATS SLAM REPUBLICANS FOR & # 39; POLITICAL SIDESHOW & # 39;

Senator Richard Blumenthal, who gave opening speeches on behalf of the Democrats on Tuesday, criticized the hearing as a "political sideshow" and claimed it was not "serious" and more of a distraction from real issues.

"Their immunity," said Blumenthal of technology companies, "is way too broad and victims of their harm deserve a day in court."

"But this hearing is certainly not the serious process we need," he continued. "It can be a political sideline, a public tar and feather."

"The fact is that the purpose of today's hearing seems to be to bully or beat you, Mr. Zuckerberg and Mr. Dorsey, as well, to act more responsibly by threatening to cut Section 230."

During the hearing, Republicans focused heavily on the disproportionate censorship of conservative votes by Twitter and Facebook, while Democrats focused on spreading misinformation on the platforms.

Republican senators also used their time to question Zuckerberg and Dorsey to complain that their claims of "stealing" the elections are being suppressed.

Democrats, on the other hand, kept repeating that Trump's election-related claims were false – and seemed to toss in the face at Republicans that their candidate had lost re-election.

Democratic Senator Richard Blumenthal, who virtually joined, accused Republicans of calling the hearing for a "political sideshow" instead of actually having a real talk about the repeal of Section 230

Democratic Senator Richard Blumenthal, who virtually joined, accused Republicans of calling the hearing for a "political sideshow" instead of actually having a real talk about the repeal of Section 230

Blumenthal is a big critic of big tech companies and the Democratic Party's advocate for privacy and security on the Internet. He is particularly critical of Section 230, claiming that these platforms offer too much protection.

"A series of big tech hearings on antitrust issues, privacy concerns and Section 230 are long overdue. I have indeed called for a separation from tech giants because they have abused their size and power," said Blumenthal.

He suggested separating Facebook from its WhatsApp and Instagram subsidiaries and giving consumers more protection over their data – as well as reforming Section 230, which extends to complete repeal.

"My colleagues seem to want to ignore the disinformation campaigns abroad that are supposed to encroach on our democracy," said Blumenthal, and attacked his Republican colleagues for not asking Zuckerberg and Dorsey questions about Russian interference in support of Trump's campaign.

"What we have seen here is fighting words and hate speech that certainly do not deserve protection for freedom of expression," he continued.

ONLY ORDERED TWO REFERENCES OF HUNTER'S LAPTOP AFTER HEARING ABOUT YOU

Surprisingly, Republicans only raised twice the case where Twitter and Facebook censored a New York Post story revealing malicious information about Joe Biden's son Hunter.

Chairman Lindsey Graham said the platforms acted as the "ultimate publisher" by restricting circulation, flagging the article and even preventing people from posting it or risking being banned from their account. He claimed their editors prove that Facebook and Twitter should no longer be protected under Section 230.

"What I want to find out is if you're not a newspaper on Twitter or Facebook, why do you have editorial control over the New York Post?" Graham asked early in the hearing. "You decided, and perhaps for good reason, I don't know, that the New York Post articles about Hunter Biden had to be flagged, excluded from distribution, or difficult to find."

"It seems to me you are the ultimate editor," said the Republican from South Carolina. "The New York Post's editorial decision to publish the story has been overridden in various ways by Twitter and Facebook to prevent it from being circulated."

"Well, if that's not an editorial decision, I don't know what would be," said Graham.

The second mention of the Hunter Biden story came during a questioning Republican Senator John Cornyn told Dorsey on Twitter.

He asked Dorsey under what authority he suppressed the spread of the story on Hunter Biden's laptop. The Twitter boss said this was "under our terms of use" in relation to the "policy of disseminating hacked material".

"We don't want Twitter to become a distribution point for hacked materials," said Dorsey.

In his opening speech, Dorsey said the article was originally banned from being published because Twitter judged that it contained information obtained through a hack, which is against its rules.

He admitted they were wrong in their assessment after it became clear that Jäger's laptop had been turned over to the FBI and the Republicans, who then passed the information on to the Post.

"Well, you know that by writing this story you have probably given more notoriety and visibility than would have been if you had left her alone," Cornyn said.

& # 39; We recognize that. And we recognize it as a mistake we made with both the intent of the directive and the enforcement measure of not allowing people to share it publicly or privately, which is why we corrected them within 24 hours, ”defended Dorsey.

BANNON DIDN'T DO ENOUGH TO DISERVE FACEBOOK, SAYS ZUCKERBERG

Blumenthal said Tuesday that Steve Bannon should be banned from Facebook for beheading the beheading of Dr. Anthony Fauci and FBI Director Christopher Wray had requested.

But Zuckerberg said Bannon, who was Trump's campaign chairman and chief strategist for the President of the White House for just six months in 2016 before he was fired, would not be kicked off the platform.

"Are you going to commit to closing this account, Steve Bannon's account?" Blumenthal asked after referring to Bannon's comment calling to put Fauci and Wray's heads on pike.

"No, that is not what our policy is proposing in this case," Zuckerberg said during the hearing.

Twitter banned Bannon for the comment made on his War Room webcast earlier this month.

However, Facebook only removed the video and allowed its account to remain active.

Zuckerberg said: & # 39; The content in question violated our guidelines and we've removed it. A content violation does not automatically mean that your account will be deleted. & # 39;

"Steve Bannon called for the beheadings of Dr. Fauci and FBI Director Wray in a live Facebook video for not doing anything cheaper to President Trump," said Blumenthal. "How many times can Steve Bannon request the assassination of government officials before Facebook suspends his account?"

The Facebook CEO said that those who post terrorist content or child pornography will lose their accounts for a first offense, but that there must be multiple offenses for other content to start.

Zuckerberg reportedly told employees last week that Bannon had not committed enough violations to justify the banishment.

Bannon's controversial remarks on Fauci and Wray read as follows: “I would really like to go back to the old days of Tudor England. I would lay my heads on pike, right? I put them in the two corners of the White House as a warning to the federal bureaucrats. Either you get the program or you are gone. «

WHY VOTE FRAUD CLAIMS ARE FLAGS, BUT HOLOCAUST REFUSAL IS NOT, REPUBLICANS ASK

Republicans demanded answers from Dorsey and Zuckerberg on why former U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley tweets were flagged for election fraud, while those sent by Iranian Ayatollah Khamenei to deny the Holocaust were not flagged.

Haley set fire to Twitter on Friday for reporting her claim of ballot harvesting leading to election fraud, while leaving untouched a tweet from the Iranian Supreme Leader wondering why it is "a crime to doubt the Holocaust." to wake up".

& # 39; Impressive. When the Iranian Ayatollah says the Holocaust did not occur, Twitter is not saying that this claim is controversial. When I say that ballot collection facilitates election fraud, Twitter is saying it is controversial. Wonder why conservatives don't trust big tech? & # 39; Haley tweeted.

The Republican former U.S. ambassador and governor of South Carolina laid down in the tech giant after slapping a warning label on a tweet from her earlier that also complained about some states' practice of sending ballots to all voters.

Former US Ambassador Nikki Haley complained on Friday that Twitter flagged her tweet about harvesting ballots (bottom left) as a "controversial claim" while she tweeted a tweet from Iranian Supreme Leader Ali Khamenei about the "doubts" of the Holocaust left untouched.

Former US Ambassador Nikki Haley complained on Friday that Twitter flagged her tweet about picking ballots (bottom left) as a "controversial claim", while a tweet from Iranian Supreme Leader Ali Khamenei about "doubts" about the Holocaust remained untouched.

Lindsey Graham was behind a billboard at the hearing during his opening speech showing Haley and the Ayatollah's tweets

Lindsey Graham was behind a billboard at the hearing during his opening speech showing Haley and the Ayatollah's tweets

“Despite what the media has said, election fraud does occur, and policies like collecting ballots and sending ballots out to people who don't request them make it easier. This has to stop, ”Haley wrote in the tweet, which was described as“ controversial ”.

The tweet was linked to a post on their advocacy website, Stand for America, which listed two examples of ballot collection leading to election fraud charges.

This included a case in Paterson, New Jersey, where the attorney general charged a city council and an elected city council of electoral fraud crimes after allegedly inappropriately filing third party ballots for a May election.

A judge overturned the results of this election.

Over half of the US states allow third parties to collect postal ballot papers from voters. Supporters say this will help count votes from those with restricted access to the U.S. Postal Service.

According to Fox News, Twitter announced Haley's tweet about the practice as part of its Civic Integrity Project. Efforts target tweets with false information about votes, including "controversial claims that could undermine confidence in the process itself".

President Trump has repeatedly claimed – without providing any evidence – that massive postal voting fraud cost the election and that the Democrats "stole" him. Twitter flagged a thread of its tweets making such claims on November 7th.

Haley's tweet received a flag from Twitter on Friday as part of a policy "flagging controversial claims that could undermine confidence in the (electoral) process itself".

Ayatollah Ali Khamenei tweeted about criminalizing Holocaust doubts in October, but Twitter ruled that doing so did not violate his rules for world leaders

Haley's tweet received a flag from Twitter on Friday as part of a policy "flagging controversial claims that could undermine confidence in the (electoral) process itself". In October, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei tweeted about criminalizing Holocaust doubts, but Twitter ruled that doing so did not violate its rules for world leaders

Haley's claim didn't go anywhere near that. Her first tweet no longer had a warning sign until Saturday.

According to Fox News, Iranian Ayatollah Ali Khamenei's October tweet was left alone in October based on the rules of Twitter World Leaders.

Under these rules, Twitter generally allows the world's leaders to "saber-rattle" without making specific threats to people.

Another of Khamenei's tweets described Israel's "Zionist regime" as "deadly cancer growth".

"Speaking against our own people or the citizens of a country is different in our opinion and can cause more immediate damage," said Jack Dorsey, CEO of Twitter, before a Senate committee on October 28 when asked about the Ayatollah's tweets.

SECTION 230: THE LAW AT THE CENTER OF BIG TECH SHOWDOWN

26 words contained in a 1996 Telecommunications Revision Act enabled companies like Facebook, Twitter, and Google to grow into the giants they are today.

Under US law, internet companies are generally exempt from liability for the material users posted on their networks. Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act of 1996 – itself part of a broader telecommunications law – provides Internet companies with a legal “safe haven”.

But Republicans are increasingly arguing that Twitter, Facebook, and other social media platforms have abused this protection and should lose their immunity – or at least have to earn it by meeting government-set requirements.

Section 230 is unlikely to be easily dismantled. But if it were, the internet as we know it might cease to exist.

What is Section 230?

If a news site falsely describes you as a scammer, you can sue the publisher for defamation. But if someone posts this on Facebook, you can't sue the company – only the person who posted it.

This is thanks to section 230, which states that "no provider or user of an interactive computer service may be treated as a publisher or speaker of information provided by any other information content provider".

This legal phrase protects companies that can host trillions of messages from being forgotten by someone who feels harmed by something wrong – whether their complaint is legitimate or not.

According to Section 230, social platforms can also moderate their services by removing posts that are, for example, obscene or violate the services' own standards, provided they act in “good faith”.

Where did section 230 come from?

The history of the measure dates back to the 1950s when bookstore owners were held liable for "profanity" sales of books that were not protected by the first amendment. One case eventually reached the Supreme Court which found that it created a "chilling effect" to hold someone responsible for someone else's content.

That meant plaintiffs had to prove that the booksellers knew they were selling obscene books, said Jeff Kosseff, author of "The Twenty-Six Words That Made the Internet," a book on Section 230.

A few decades later, when the commercial internet was on the rise with services like CompuServe and Prodigy. Both offered online forums, but CompuServe chose not to moderate this, while Prodigy, seeking a family-friendly image, did.

CompuServe was sued and the case dismissed. However, Prodigy ran into trouble. The judge in their case ruled that "they exercised editorial control – so you are more of a newspaper than a newspaper kiosk," said Kosseff.

That didn't go well with politicians, who feared the outcome would deter internet startups from moderating at all. And Section 230 was born.

"Today it protects against liability for user contributions as well as liability for mussels for moderating content," said Kosseff.

What if section 230 is limited or goes away?

"I don't think any of the social media companies would exist in their current form without Section 230," said Kosseff. "They designed their business models to be large platforms for user content."

There are two possible outcomes. Platforms could become more cautious, as Craigslist did after the passage of a sex trafficking bill in 2018 that carved out an exemption from Section 230 for material that "promotes or facilitates prostitution." Craigslist quickly removed its "Personals" section, which was not intended to make sex work easier. But the company didn't want to take any chances.

Indeed, this result could harm none other than the president himself, who routinely attacks individuals, entertains conspiracy theories and accuses others of the crimes.

"If platforms weren't legally immune, they wouldn't risk the legal liability that might come with accepting Donald Trump's lies, defamation, and threats," said Kate Ruane, senior legislative counsel for the American Civil Liberties Union.

Another possibility: Facebook, Twitter and other platforms could give up moderation entirely and let the lower common denominator predominate.

Such unsupervised services could easily be dominated by trolls like 8chan, which is notorious for graphic and extremist content, said Eric Goldman, a law professor at Santa Clara University. Undoing section 230 would be an "existential threat to the Internet," he said.

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