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It's the Hyacinth Bucket Effect! A third of people change their voice when they are on the phone


It's the Hyacinth Bucket Effect! A third of people change their voice when they talk on the phone … and almost half of them "try to sound fancier".

  • Almost half of the respondents admitted that they are trying to sound better spoken
  • Approach similar to Hyacinth Bucket in the BBC sitcom Keeping Up Appearances
  • Three in ten change their voice because they want to sound smarter

According to a survey, more than a third of people change their voice when they make a call.

And nearly half of those polled admit they're trying to sound better spoken – like Hyacinth Bucket in the BBC sitcom Keeping Up Appearances from the 1990s, which pronounced their last name Bouquet.

Three in ten change their voices because they want to sound smarter, and ten percent want to be more fun, according to the nationwide survey of 2,000 people.

Almost one in ten stated that they changed their voice without realizing it, but are made aware of this by others.

According to a survey, more than a third of people change their voice when they make a call. And nearly half of those polled admit they're trying to sound better spoken – like Hyacinth Bucket in the BBC sitcom Keeping Up Appearances from the 1990s, which pronounced their last name Bouquet

Customers, work colleagues, and strangers are among the people for whom respondents frequently change the way they speak.

Around a fifth said they automatically change their voice when they answer a number they don't recognize, while just under a fifth said their regional accent is more pronounced on the phone.

People in Scotland are particularly likely to change their voices, the study found.

Almost half of those surveyed in Aberdeen said they do so when making a phone call.

Sheffield residents were the least likely to change their voices. Six in ten said they don't – although a fifth said it should sound more local for them to do so.

Norwich residents feel most pressured to sound smart, according to the survey. 52 percent who change their voice admit that is their intention.

About a fifth of people in London who change their voice do so for more fun, and a quarter of people in the North East and North West of England said they don't notice they change their voice on the phone, but this is told to them by other people.

When it comes to voices people want to sound like, Sir David Attenborough was voted the most popular celebrity voice, closely followed by Absolutely Fabulous star Joanna Lumley and Luther actor Idris Elba.

The survey was carried out by Bank Santander UK.

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