ENTERTAINMENT

Incredible moment as the former prima ballerina, now suffering from Alzheimer's, is transformed


This is the incredible moment when a former prima ballerina suffering from Alzheimer's disease transforms when she hears the music from Swan Lake.

Marta C Gonzalez, who died in 2019, sits in her wheelchair in a nursing home in Valencia.

A supervisor puts on her headphones and begins to play Tchaikovsky's Swan Lake – which Ms. Gonzalez danced to in her youth.

She had been a prima ballerina for the New York Ballet in the 1960s.

Marta C Gonzalez, who died in 2019, sits in her wheelchair in a nursing home in Valencia

Pictured: Ms. Gonzalez performs with the New York Ballet in 1967

Pictured: Ms. Gonzalez performs with the New York Ballet in 1967

A supervisor puts on her headphones and begins to play Tchaikovsky's Swan Lake - which Ms. Gonzalez danced to in her youth

A supervisor puts on her headphones and begins to play Tchaikovsky's Swan Lake – which Ms. Gonzalez danced to in her youth

As the music flows through her, Ms. Gonzalez is visibly moved.

Within a few moments, her hands instinctively mimick the graceful movements she performed on stage in 1967.

She continues to follow the music and remembers the choreography she danced to decades ago.

The emotional moment captured prior to Ms. Gonzalez's death in 2019 was shared by Asociacion Musica para Despertar, a Spanish charity that uses, among other things, the music of the lives of people with dementia to improve their mood and memory.

In the video, Ms. Gonzalez listens to the music on headphones and soon starts repeating the choreography she danced to all those years ago.

As the music flows through her, Ms. Gonzalez is visibly moved

As the music flows through her, Ms. Gonzalez is visibly moved

Actor Antonio Banderas shared the clip on Facebook, saying he hoped the video would serve as "well-deserved recognition of her art and passion."

He wrote: & # 39; 53 years ago she was a NYC ballet dancer. Tchaikovsky's music managed to mock his Alzheimer's disease. A year has passed since all of this.

“Now, on the occasion of your death, serve the distribution of these images as well-deserved recognition of your art and your passion.

"RIP Marta C. Gonzalez."

After her performance, she was greeted with applause by those present in the nursing home in Valencia.

Within a few moments, her hands instinctively mimick the graceful movements she performed on stage in 1967

Within a few moments, her hands instinctively mimick the graceful movements she performed on stage in 1967

Actor Antonio Banderas shared the clip on Facebook, saying he hoped the video would serve as "well-deserved recognition of her art and passion."

Actor Antonio Banderas shared the clip on Facebook, saying he hoped the video would serve as "well-deserved recognition of her art and passion."

She is then comforted when she tells a caregiver that she is "emotional".

"The power of music is immeasurable," said the charity. & # 39; May she rest in peace. & # 39;

Last April, Health Secretary Matt Hancock announced that people with dementia would benefit from “personal playlists”.

He said music and dance lessons should be prescribed to more people with dementia after a study by the charity Playlist for Life found that providing personal music playlists to patients resulted in a 60 percent reduction in medication needs.

Mr. Hancock added, “There is growing evidence that music can calm people with dementia by reducing anxiety and helping people cope better with symptoms.

"This is the kind of personal attention that I fully support as an important part of our NHS long-term plan."

Dementia affects more than 850,000 people in the UK each year – a number that is expected to rise to over a million by 2025.

Could this playlist of wartime classics ease symptoms in people with dementia? The study shows that ancient records are triggering a wave of relief from disease-related anxiety

From Megan Sheets

Playing a war classic like You Are My Sunshine alleviates Alzheimer's symptoms, according to new research.

Nurses have long used music for dementia therapy as it has been shown to relieve stress and increase the mood of people with neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer's – see a list of their favorite songs below.

A new study from the University of Utah Health found that listening to their favorite music triggered a surge of activity in multiple areas of a patient's brain, including the previously quiet social and sensory centers.

The results showed that keeping an old file up can significantly alleviate the debilitating effects of Alzheimer's, including anxiety, depression, and restlessness.

An estimated six million people in the United States have dementia, an umbrella term for a group of symptoms including memory impairment, confusion, and loss of ability to carry out everyday activities.

Alzheimer's and other forms of dementia cause the brain to deteriorate rapidly, often affecting a person's ability to recognize their families or remember events from their lives.

However, music memory somehow escapes the damage and allows patients to remember songs that matter to them even when most of their other memories are gone.

"When you put headphones on for dementia sufferers and play familiar music, they come to life," said Jace King, a PhD student at the Brain Network Lab and lead author of the paper released Friday.

"Music is like an anchor that brings the patient back to reality."

In the new study, the researchers hypothesized that the beneficial effects of music are related to the brain's salience network.

The salience network is believed to be an integral part of cognitive functioning by regulating activity in other areas of the brain, including visual, emotional, and social networks.

Previous research has shown that damage to the salience network leads to a reduction in communication between different areas of the brain, similar to what happens in people with dementia.

SAMPLE PLAYLIST FOR YOUR LOVED ONES WITH DEMENTIA

While dementia affects a person's memory, music stays with them.

Below are 15 of the most highly recommended songs by caregivers and senior programs.

  1. You are my Sunshine – Jimmie Davis
  2. She will come around the mountain – Tommy Tucker time
  3. This country is your country – Woody Guthrie
  4. Amazing Grace – Elvis Presley
  5. Over the rainbow – Judy Garland
  6. Pennies from heaven – Bing Crosby
  7. Moonlight serenade – Glen Miller
  8. A-Tisket A-Tasket – Ella Fitzgerald
  9. Moonlight – Benny Goodman
  10. Outdoorsman – Nat King Cole
  11. Memories are made of it – Dean Martin
  12. Wheel of Fortune – Kay Starr
  13. Just five minutes – Frank Sinatra
  14. Look for the silver lining – Chet Baker
  15. The Goldberg Variations – J.S. Brook

Source: A Place for Mom

"People with dementia are faced with an unfamiliar world that causes disorientation and fear," said Dr. Jeff Anderson, Associate Professor of Radiology at U of U Health and contributing author on the study.

"We believe that music will open up the brain's outstanding network that is still functioning relatively well."

Within three weeks, the researchers trained 17 participants, with an average age of 71, how to use a portable media player and helped them create a playlist of their favorite songs.

Using a functional MRI, the researchers scanned the patients to image the regions of the brain that lit up when they heard eight 20-second clips from their personalized music collection, eight clips of the same music in reverse order, and eight blocks of silence.

The scans showed that music activated different areas of the brain, including the visual network, the salience network, the executive network, and the pairs of the cerebellar and corticocerebellar networks.

"This is objective evidence from brain imaging that shows that personally meaningful music is an alternative way of communicating with patients with Alzheimer's disease," said Dr. Norman Foster, director of the Center for Alzheimer's Care at the University of U Health and senior author of the paper.

"Speech and visual memory pathways are damaged early in the course of the disease, but personalized music programs can activate the brain, especially in patients who lose touch with their surroundings."

The authors emphasized that while the results are promising, they are partly inconclusive because the sample was small and only one round of imaging was performed for each person.

They did not determine how long the music lasted in the brain or whether it had long-term effects.

Ultimately, however, they were encouraged by the results.

"In our society, diagnoses of dementia are increasing and resource-intensive," said Anderson.

"Nobody says making music will be a cure for Alzheimer's disease, but it could manage symptoms better, reduce care costs, and improve a patient's quality of life."