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In Beirut's Ground Zero: Amazing images show the extent of the devastation in the Lebanese capital


These amazing images show the extent of the destruction in Beirut after an explosion in the port that killed more than 100 people and injured thousands.

The rescuers worked all night and into Wednesday morning, looking for survivors at zero after the catastrophic explosion that destroyed entire neighborhoods in the Lebanese capital.

The extent of the destruction was so great that the capital resembled the site of an earthquake. Thousands of people were left homeless and thousands crowded into overwhelmed hospitals for treatment.

Beirut Governor Marwan Abboud burst into tears while touring the site of the explosion. "Beirut is a ruined city," he said.

Marwan Ramadan was 500 meters from the port but was still knocked off his feet by the explosion. "It was a real horror show," he said. "I haven't seen anything like it since the war days."

The streets were littered with glass on Wednesday morning and entire buildings were destroyed or left with no roofs or balconies as people walked the streets dazed and crying as they gazed at the ruins around them.

Prime Minister Hassan Diab vowed that those responsible would "pay the price" when he declared a two-week state of emergency to deal with the crisis.

The devastating explosion – in a country already in the midst of an economic crisis – was caused by 2,750 tons of ammonium nitrate exploding with one-fifth the force of the atomic bomb that leveled Hiroshima.

After yesterday's explosion in the port of the Lebanese capital Beirut, a destroyed silo can be seen in the middle of the rubble and rubble

This photo shows the scene of the devastation the explosion caused in the city, which is already suffering from economic problems

This photo shows the scene of the devastation the explosion caused in the city, which is already suffering from economic problems

Police and forensic scientists work at the site of an explosion that took place yesterday in the port of the Lebanese capital Beirut

Police and forensic scientists work at the site of an explosion that took place yesterday in the port of the Lebanese capital Beirut

The scene of an explosion near the harbor in the Lebanese capital Beirut as rescuers in search of survivors

The scene of an explosion near the harbor in the Lebanese capital Beirut as rescuers in search of survivors

A Lebanese army helicopter flies in the port area on Wednesday morning over the site of the explosion on Tuesday

A Lebanese army helicopter flies in the port area on Wednesday morning over the site of the explosion on Tuesday

The site of the explosion that devastated the capital of Beirut last night. Rescuers worked all night looking for survivors

The site of the explosion that devastated the capital of Beirut last night. Rescuers worked all night looking for survivors

A Lebanese army helicopter throws water on the site of the explosion Wednesday morning. All night long, smoke poured from the site of the disaster

A Lebanese army helicopter throws water on the site of the explosion Wednesday morning. All night long, smoke poured from the site of the disaster

A man walks through the devastated port area, which is filled with destroyed buildings and storage facilities

A man walks through the devastated port area, which is filled with destroyed buildings and storage facilities

A drone image shows the scene of an explosion that hit the port in Beirut yesterday and devastated the capital

A drone image shows the scene of an explosion that hit the port in Beirut yesterday and devastated the capital

"We've had some dark days in Lebanon over the years, but that's different," said Rami Rifai, a 38-year-old engineer, of a hospital where his two daughters were treated after they sustained cuts despite half the cutting time had drawn kilometers from the seat of the explosion.

& # 39; We've already had the economic crisis, a government of thieves and coronavirus. I didn't think it could get any worse, but now I don't know if this country can get up again. Everyone will try to leave. I'll try to go, ”he said, his voice choked with tears.

In the areas closest to the port, the extent of destruction from the long years of civil war between 1975 and 1990 was reached in seconds by an explosion that leveled buildings within a few hundred meters.

A resident of Mar Mikhail, one of the hardest hit neighborhoods, said she saw corpses in the middle of the street, apparently thrown from balconies and roofs by the explosion.

The mushroom-shaped explosion, which seismologists said was a magnitude 3.3 quake, and the magnitude of the damage drew nuclear analogies in many people's accounts of the tragedy.

"The Apocalypse" was the headline of L & # 39; Orient-Le Jour, the most important French-language newspaper in Lebanon, a country that has seen many explosions in the recent past, but none as large.

The embattled government of Prime Minister Hassan Diab described the circumstances in the port that led to the explosion as "unacceptable" and promised to initiate an investigation.

"Those responsible for this disaster will pay the price," he said.

A survivor is torn from the rubble as rescuers search for survivors today following the explosion that destroyed the Lebanese capital

A survivor is torn from the rubble as rescuers search for survivors today following the explosion that destroyed the Lebanese capital

Lebanese soldiers are searching for survivors this morning, a massive explosion that has wreaked havoc in the city

Lebanese soldiers are searching for survivors this morning, a massive explosion that has wreaked havoc in the city

A woman sweeps a damaged hospital after the explosion on Tuesday. Offices, restaurants and other buildings were also destroyed by the explosion

A woman sweeps a damaged hospital after the explosion on Tuesday. Offices, restaurants and other buildings were also destroyed by the explosion

A view of the partially destroyed Beirut neighborhood from Mar Mikhael this morning near the epicenter of the explosion

A view of the partially destroyed Beirut neighborhood from Mar Mikhael this morning near the epicenter of the explosion

People inspect a damaged gas station near an explosion site. Destroyed vehicles can also be seen and the nearby buildings all have broken windows

People inspect a damaged gas station near an explosion site. Destroyed vehicles can also be seen and the nearby buildings all have broken windows

The explosion tore a huge hole in the middle of this building as a man inspects the damage to the front

The explosion tore a huge hole in the middle of this building as a man inspects the damage to the front

A woman uses her cell phone to take photos of a damaged church with broken pews on the floor

A woman uses her cell phone to take photos of a damaged church with broken pews on the floor

A man walks past a completely destroyed building and cars covered in dust and debris in the Lebanese capital

A man walks past a completely destroyed building and cars covered in dust and debris in the Lebanese capital

A man inspects damage near yesterday's explosion in the Lebanese capital, Beirut

A man inspects damage near yesterday's explosion in the Lebanese capital, Beirut

A damaged facade can be seen after the explosion. The explosion was so devastating that many windows were blown from their frames

A damaged facade can be seen after the explosion. The explosion was so devastating that many windows were blown from their frames

Messages of support came in from around the world for Lebanon, whose economy was already on its knees after defaulting on national debt earlier this year.

A crippling devaluation has caused poverty to rise to an estimated 50 percent of the population. For a country so heavily reliant on imports, the wiping out of the main port created further difficulties.

Criticism of the government was already widespread on social media, where Lebanese users argued that a catastrophe of this magnitude could only occur in a state whose institutions were crippled by incompetence and corruption.

Late Tuesday, thousands of families drove out of Beirut to keep their families safe, but many others were stranded without a roof, had nowhere to go, or refused to leave their gutted houses open to looters.

Rescue efforts were slowed down at night by the lack of electricity, which in large parts of the city was at best intermittent before the explosion.

The security forces sealed a huge area around the explosion site and turned away residents who tried to reach their homes to assess the damage.

People on the street in Beirue which is littered with rubble from damaged buildings after the explosion

People on the street in Beirue which is littered with rubble from damaged buildings after the explosion

A man reacts to an explosion in the port of the Lebanese capital, Beirut, on Aug. 4

A man reacts to an explosion in the port of the Lebanese capital, Beirut, on Aug. 4

A huge explosion shook the Lebanese capital, Beirut, wounding dozens of people, shook buildings and raised huge clouds of smoke into the sky

A huge explosion shook the Lebanese capital, Beirut, wounding dozens of people, shook buildings and raised huge clouds of smoke into the sky

Entire buildings in Beirut were reduced to rubble yesterday after a chemical explosion hit the city and wreaked havoc for miles

Entire buildings in Beirut were reduced to rubble yesterday after a chemical explosion hit the city and wreaked havoc for miles

A big explosion shook the Lebanese capital Beirut today. The explosion, which shook entire buildings and shattered glass, was felt in several parts of the city

A big explosion shook the Lebanese capital Beirut today. The explosion, which shook entire buildings and shattered glass, was felt in several parts of the city

In gloomy scenes, citizens were desperate when their homes were damaged, walls were burned through and windows were broken

In gloomy scenes, citizens were desperate when their homes were damaged, walls were burned through and windows were broken

A view of damage to a house in Burj Abu Haidar in Beirut

Paola Rebeiz was watching TV when an explosion in central Beirut struck her home in St. Nicolas, about a kilometer south of the location, and shattered all of her windows

The explosion did serious damage to people's homes. Paola Rebeiz was watching TV when an explosion in central Beirut hit her home in St. Nicolas, about a kilometer south of the explosion, and smashed all the windows (right).

One view shows the incoming damage to a shop in the Burj Abu Haidar in Beirut

One view shows the incoming damage to a shop in the Burj Abu Haidar in Beirut

Glass is broken by the explosion at the Cavalier Hotel in Beirut after the explosion

Glass is broken by the explosion at the Cavalier Hotel in Beirut after the explosion

A cell phone picture showing a general view of the port area with smoke from a large area with damage and debris after a large explosion rocked the Beirut port area

A cell phone picture showing a general view of the port area with smoke from a large area with damage and debris after a large explosion rocked the Beirut port area

It devastated the immediate surrounding buildings, where firefighters were still fighting the flames tonight, and even devastated areas that were miles from the explosion site

It devastated the immediate surrounding buildings, where firefighters were still fighting the flames tonight, and even devastated areas that were miles from the explosion site

Fires burn late into the night in the port of Beirut after an explosion, believed to be caused by chemicals

Fires burn late into the night in the port of Beirut following an explosion, believed to be caused by chemicals

Clouds of smoke at the site of the great explosion and buildings turn into twisted rubble

Clouds of smoke at the site of the great explosion and buildings turn into twisted rubble

The explosion ripped through buildings and blew bricks out of the walls and carried them onto the street.

The explosion ripped through buildings and blew bricks out of the walls and carried them onto the street.

Dramatic shots show smoke rising from the port area just before a giant fireball explodes in the sky and covers the city with a thick cloud of mushrooms

Dramatic material on social media shows people screaming as a massive explosion shakes the Lebanese capital's waterfront

Dramatic shots show smoke rising from the port area just before a giant fireball explodes in the sky and covers the city with a thick cloud of mushrooms

People drive past a car that was wrecked after a building wall collapsed in the explosion that wreaked havoc for kilometers

People drive past a car that was wrecked after a building wall collapsed in the explosion that wreaked havoc for kilometers

The images showed port buildings reduced to tangled brickwork, devastating the main entry point into a country that relies on food imports to feed its more than six million residents

The images showed port buildings reduced to tangled brickwork, devastating the main entry point into a country that relies on food imports to feed its more than six million residents

The explosion devastated parts of the city as Lebanon grappled with the worst economic crisis in decades

The explosion devastated parts of the city as Lebanon grappled with the worst economic crisis in decades

Firefighters start a fire at the site of an explosion in the port of the Lebanese capital Beirut

Firefighters start a fire at the site of an explosion in the port of the Lebanese capital Beirut

The lobby of a building overlooks the central Martyrs Square of the Lebanese capital, Beirut, with rubble and debris from the street after massive explosions in the nearby port of Beirut

The lobby of a building overlooks the central Martyrs Square of the Lebanese capital, Beirut, with rubble and debris from the street after massive explosions in the nearby port of Beirut

Outside a hospital, Omar Kinno sat on the sidewalk holding back tears. Kinno, a Syrian, said one of his sisters was killed when the explosion rocked her apartment near the port and broke another sister's neck.

His injured mother and father were taken to a hospital but he didn't know which ones and he phoned to find them.

“I have no idea what happened to my parents. I'm totally lost, ”he said.

Vital infrastructure was damaged, and Roum Hospital called for generators. A medical center received 300 emergency patients. “I've never seen that before. It was awful, ”said a paramedic.

Confusion reigned across the city as people evacuated damaged homes or tried to find families. Motorcyclists made their way through the traffic and carried the injured.

Soldiers cordoned off the port last night, warning that the burning chemicals could give off toxic fumes.

Regardless, relatives of the missing arrived on the edge.

A woman in her twenties yelled at security guards and asked about the fate of her brother, a port worker.

"His name is Jad, his eyes are green," she pleaded in vain, as the security forces would not let her enter.

Nearby, another woman nearly passed out when she asked about her brother who worked in the port.

But the security forces were not immune to emotions either.

The body of one of their colleagues was brought to them on a stretcher. A fellow officer pulled out a photo of the deceased with his fiancée, and the comrades wept.

Firefighters spray water on a fire after an explosion was heard in Beirut

Firefighters spray water on a fire after an explosion was heard in Beirut

A car was turned upside down in the explosion that hit Beirut yesterday, wreaking havoc across the board

A car was turned upside down in the explosion that hit Beirut yesterday, wreaking havoc across the board

There was a structural fire near the port of Beirut, followed by a second massive explosion that damaged surrounding buildings and injured thousands

There was a structural fire near the port of Beirut, followed by a second massive explosion that damaged surrounding buildings and injured thousands

Critical infrastructure such as hospitals were damaged, as was the city's airport, despite being six miles from the site of the explosion and revealing the extent of the trauma

Critical infrastructure such as hospitals were damaged, as was the city's airport, despite being six miles from the site of the explosion and revealing the extent of the trauma

Rescue workers search a street for survivors after a large explosion caused buildings to collapse

Rescue workers search a street for survivors after a large explosion caused buildings to collapse

In the parish of St. Marron, the priest sent his sermon to his congregation, as is customary with the coronavirus. The video shows an initial explosion turning off the power and ominously blowing out the candles behind him – but he holds out without knowing what is approaching.

Seconds later, the main shock wave hits and brings stained glass windows to the altar. On the run, the footage shows a piece of masonry slamming into his back and sending him to the ground.

But in rare positive news yesterday, locals reported that he was not seriously injured.

In the port itself, the hangars looked like charred cans, everything was destroyed beyond recognition when fire helicopters flew overhead and released water.

Ships burned at sea. The UN peacekeeping mission in Lebanon, UNIFIL, said one of their boats was damaged in port and some of its peacekeeping forces were injured, some seriously.

Authorities feared fires on boats could trigger further explosions or oil spills if they sink.

"The explosion caused an opening and there are serious injuries on board," said an Egyptian seaman, pointing to his ship, the Mero Sar, in the port.

Reporters from the city newspaper, the Lebanon Daily Star, released footage of their own office that was wiped out.

Miles from the site of the explosion, balconies were torn down, the ceiling collapsed and the windows broken.

Even largely undamaged areas were dark last night, with power outages across the city.

A woman covered in blood from the waist down was walking down a ruined street while talking angrily on her phone. On another street, a bloody-faced woman looked distraught and staggered through the traffic with two friends by her side.

A young man came by. "This country is cursed," he muttered.

Firemen are setting fire to a fire in the city's port tonight following the fatal explosion that devastated Beirut

Firemen are setting fire to a fire in the city's port tonight following the fatal explosion that devastated Beirut

Pictures show the scene of an explosion in the port of the Lebanese capital Beirut, which devastated the surrounding buildings

Pictures show the scene of an explosion in the port of the Lebanese capital Beirut, which devastated the surrounding buildings

A general view of the port area with smoke from an area of ​​a major explosion, with damage and debris after a major explosion, rocked the Beirut port area

A general view of the port area with smoke from an area of ​​a major explosion, with damage and debris after a major explosion, rocked the Beirut port area

A car that toppled on the roof on a freeway today was on the roof earlier today as a result of the devastating effects of the explosion

A car that toppled on the roof on a freeway today was on the roof earlier today as a result of the devastating effects of the explosion

Israel denies any involvement in the port of Beirut explosion that arises in the face of mounting tensions between Lebanon and its neighbor

by Ryan Fahey and William Cole for MailOnline

Israel has denied having anything to do with the huge explosion in Beirut and added that the country is ready to provide humanitarian and medical aid to Lebanon.

The massive explosion in port camps near the city center killed more than 100 people, injured over 4,000 and sent shock waves that shattered windows, smashed masonry and shook the floor.

Officials said they expected the death toll from the Tuesday explosion to continue as rescue workers dug through rubble to rescue and remove the dead. It was the strongest explosion in years in Beirut that has been hit by an economic crisis and an increase in coronavirus infections.

The Lebanese Interior Minister said initial information indicated that years ago, high-explosive material that had been confiscated from the port had been blown up. Israel, which has waged several wars with Lebanon, denied any role.

The Lebanese Interior Minister said initial information indicated that years ago, high-explosive material that had been confiscated from the port had been blown up

The Lebanese Interior Minister said initial information indicated that years ago, high-explosive material that had been confiscated from the port had been blown up

"Israel has approached Lebanon through international security and diplomatic channels and offered medical and humanitarian aid to the Lebanese government," said Israeli Defense Minister Benny Gantz and Foreign Minister Gabi Ashkenazi in a written statement.

Das Angebot kommt nach zwei Wochen verschärfter Spannungen zwischen den rivalisierenden Nachbarn, die eine Reihe von Grenzkollisionen zwischen den israelischen Streitkräften (IDF) und der Hisbollah an der Nordgrenze Israels beinhalteten.

Anfang dieses Monats warf Israel der Hisbollah vor, sie habe versucht, bewaffnete Männer über die von den Vereinten Nationen abgegrenzte Blaue Linie zu schicken, und erklärte, sie habe die libanesische Regierung für einen sogenannten "Terroranschlag" verantwortlich gemacht.

In den letzten Jahren gab es zahlreiche ähnliche Grenzüberschreitungen, aber der jüngste Konflikt zwischen den beiden Seiten brach 2006 aus, nachdem die Hisbollah acht israelische Soldaten getötet und zwei entführt hatte, was den 34-tägigen Israel-Libanon-Krieg auslöste.

Die Hisbollah startete Raketen auf ihren südlichen Nachbarn und Israel erwiderte das Feuer und bombardierte libanesische Städte, Dörfer und wichtige Infrastrukturziele.

Israelische Soldaten überwachen Anfang dieses Monats die Grenze des Landes zum Libanon in der Nähe der nördlichen Stadt Metula

Israelische Soldaten überwachen Anfang dieses Monats die Grenze des Landes zum Libanon in der Nähe der nördlichen Stadt Metula

Verwundete werden nach der Explosion in einem Krankenhaus behandelt, bei der in der vergangenen Nacht Hunderte von Opfern in Beirut ums Leben gekommen sind

Verwundete werden nach der Explosion in einem Krankenhaus behandelt, bei der in der vergangenen Nacht Hunderte von Opfern in Beirut ums Leben gekommen sind

Der Konflikt endete nicht schlüssig und die beiden Seiten befinden sich technisch immer noch im Krieg. Der Libanon ist einer von 31 UN-Mitgliedstaaten, die die Existenz Israels als Staat nicht anerkennen.

Internationale Hilfe in Form von Rettungskräften und medizinischem Personal ist bereits auf dem Weg in den Libanon.

Frankreich schickt zwei Flugzeuge mit Dutzenden von Rettungskräften, einer mobilen medizinischen Einheit und 15 Tonnen Hilfsgütern. Das Büro des französischen Präsidenten Emmanuel Macron sagt, die Hilfe sollte die Behandlung von rund 500 Opfern ermöglichen.

Französische Friedenstruppen, die im Libanon stationiert sind, einem ehemaligen französischen Protektorat, haben seit den Explosionen geholfen, sagte Macrons Büro.

Laut dem Royal Court wird ein Militärfeldkrankenhaus mit allen erforderlichen Mitarbeitern entsandt. Ägypten hat in Beirut ein Feldkrankenhaus eröffnet, um die Verwundeten aufzunehmen.

Der tschechische Innenminister Jan Hamacek sagte, der Libanon habe ein Angebot angenommen, ein Team von 37 Rettungskräften mit Spürhunden nach Beirut zu schicken. Dänemark sagt, es sei bereit, dem Libanon humanitäre Hilfe zu leisten, und Griechenland sei bereit, den libanesischen Behörden "mit allen ihm zur Verfügung stehenden Mitteln" zu helfen.

Premierminister Hassan Diab hat in einer kurzen Fernsehansprache an alle Länder und Freunde des Libanon appelliert, der kleinen Nation Hilfe zu leisten, und gesagt: "Wir erleben eine echte Katastrophe." Er bekräftigte sein Versprechen, dass die Verantwortlichen für die massive Explosion im Hafen von Beirut den Preis zahlen werden, ohne die Ursache zu kommentieren.

Diabs Rede kam am Morgen, nachdem die Explosion mindestens 100 Menschen getötet und Tausende verletzt hatte.

Am Mittwochmorgen stieg immer noch Rauch aus dem Hafen auf. The main downtown streets were littered with rubble and damaged vehicles, and building facades were blown out.

Der libanesische Rotkreuzbeamte George Kettaneh sagte, mindestens 100 Menschen seien getötet und mehr als 4.000 verletzt worden, und die Zahl der Opfer könne weiter steigen.

Nach der gestrigen Explosion bot auch der schiitische Iran, der Hauptförderer der militanten politischen Partei Hisbollah, Unterstützung an, ebenso wie Teherans regionaler Rivale Saudi-Arabien, eine führende sunnitische Macht.

"What we are experiencing is a major disaster," Lebanese Red Cross chief George Kettani told Mayadeen. "There are victims and victims everywhere."

Hours after the explosion that occurred shortly after 6 p.m. (1500 GMT), a fire that still blazed in the waterfront and cast an orange glow across the night sky as helicopters hovered and ambulance sirens sounded over the capital.

According to a source of security, the victims were taken outside the city for treatment because the hospitals in Beirut were full of wounded. Ambulances from the north and south of the country and the Bekaa Valley in the east were called for help.

The explosion was so great that some residents of the city, where memories of heavy grenades live during the civil war from 1975 to 1990, believed that an earthquake had occurred. Dazed, weeping, and wounded, people walked the streets looking for relatives.

"I promise you that this disaster will not go without accountability," Prime Minister Hassan Diab told the nation.

"Those in charge will pay the price," he said on his television address, adding that details of the "dangerous camp" would be released.

The interior minister informed Al Jadeed TV that ammonium nitrate had been stored in the port since 2014.

The U.S. embassy in Beirut warned the city residents of reports of toxic gases released by the explosion and urged people to stay indoors and wear masks, if available.

The footage of the explosion shared by residents on social media showed a pillar of smoke rising from the harbor, followed by a massive explosion that sent a white cloud and fireball to the sky. Those who filmed the incident from tall buildings 2 km from the port were thrown back by the shock.

It was not immediately clear what caused the first fire on Tuesday that triggered the explosion.

The Lebanese health minister said more than 50 people were killed and more than 2,750 injured. The Red Cross in Lebanon said hundreds of people had been brought to hospitals.

The governor of the port of Beirut told Sky News that a team of firefighters fighting the initial fire had "disappeared" after the explosion.

President Michel Aoun called for an emergency cabinet meeting on Wednesday and said a two-week state of emergency should be declared. He said it was "unacceptable" that 2,750 tons of ammonium nitrate were stored for six years without security measures.

The explosion occurred three days before a U.S.-backed court was given a verdict in the trial of four suspects of the Shiite Muslim group Hezbollah for a 2005 bombing that killed former Prime Minister Rafik al-Hariri and 21 others .

Hariri was killed by a huge truck bomb on the same bank, about 2 km from the port.

Western countries like the United States, Britain and France also said they were ready to help.

The images showed port buildings reduced to tangled masonry that devastated the main entry point into a country that relies on food imports to feed its more than 6 million people.

A new humanitarian crisis is looming in a nation that is home to hundreds of thousands of Syrian refugees and is already struggling with the economic collapse under one of the world's greatest debt burdens.

Residents said glass broke in neighborhoods on the Mediterranean coast of Beirut and in inland suburbs that are several kilometers away. In Cyprus, a Mediterranean island 180 km from Beirut, residents heard the explosion. A resident in Nicosia said his house and shutters were shaking.

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