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"I'm worried about a second wave": Matt Hancock warns that the infection wave "is rolling across Europe"


Matt Hancock today warned of a second wave of coronavirus spreading across the UK towards Europe and hinted that more vacation destinations on the continent could soon be under quarantine restrictions for the UK.

The health minister has confirmed that the government is "reviewing" plans to tell people who tested positive for coronavirus to stay home for ten days from the current seven-day self-isolation period.

Mr. Hancock also indicated that other European countries could be added to the UK quarantine list to prevent Covid-19 from being strangled again in the UK.

He told Sky News: “I'm worried about a second wave. You can see a second wave across Europe. We have to do everything we can to prevent it from reaching these shores. It is not just Spain, there are other countries where the number of cases is increasing and we are absolutely determined to do everything possible to protect this country. & # 39;

He also said that extending the isolation time for coronavirus symptoms from seven to ten days was "something we're looking at," in accordance with the World Health Organization guidelines.

The quarantine time for people returning to the UK from other countries like Spain would be reduced from 14 days to 10 days according to the same plans.

His warning came after Boris Johnson admitted that he was "extremely concerned" about the possibility of a second rise, claiming that Britain could be a fortnight behind Europe, where the number of cases increases again.

The moving average of daily falls in the UK has risen since the beginning of this month, while new restrictions and localized outbreaks have occurred in Stone, Staffordshire and Wrexham, North Wales in Oldham, Greater Manchester.

Leicester, the first place in the UK to have a mini-lock in place, is under review today – two days earlier than expected.

In other corona virus developments:

  • Oldham has overtaken Leicester with the second highest Covid 19 infection rate in England, according to official figures. A decision is being made today to extend Leicester's local block.
  • The ministers signed a multi-million pound contract with pharmaceutical giants GlaxoSmithKline and Sanofi Pasteur for over 60 million doses of another potential Covid-19 vaccine.
  • Scientists received £ 4.3m to investigate why blacks and Asians die more often from Covid-19.
  • Ten people caught the coronavirus, which is linked to a pub in Staffordshire in which 200 drinkers were pushed "like sardines" into the beer garden.

Patients who have been confirmed to have Covid may be instructed to stay at home for 14 days due to a change in the rules. Pictured: People queue at a walk-in Covid-19 test center in the parking lot on Crown Street in Stone, Staffordshire after the disease has broken out at the nearby Crown and Anchor pub

Boris Johnson, pictured on a visit to Nottingham, expressed concerns about a second attack by Covid-19 within a few weeks

Boris Johnson, pictured on a visit to Nottingham, expressed concerns about a second attack by Covid-19 within a few weeks

Isolation rules have previously created confusion as those who have been confirmed by a test to have the virus are instructed to isolate for seven days while their "close contacts" are faced for 14 days. The inequality was due to the time it took to develop symptoms of the virus.

The government has sometimes been accused of “mixed news” across the rules.

Patients who have been confirmed to have Covid or who have a cough, fever, or loss of smell or taste are currently recommended to stay at home for seven days.

The increase brings the self-isolation time closer to 14 days for those who are "in close contact" with a confirmed case, or for those returning from a country under quarantine rules.

Belgium and Luxembourg could be removed from the safe travel list tomorrow, and Croatia could also be at risk. Luxembourg has the highest incidence of coronavirus cases per 100,000 people in Europe

Belgium and Luxembourg could be removed from the safe travel list tomorrow, and Croatia could also be at risk. Luxembourg has the highest incidence of coronavirus cases per 100,000 people in Europe

Government scientific director Sir Patrick Vallance warned No10 on Monday that Britain could only be two or three weeks behind Spain's second-wave trajectory, according to The Times.

The introduction of a 10-day self-isolation period would follow the guidelines of the World Health Organization and would align Britain with many countries around the world.

Scientists from the University of Cambridge found that the reproductive rate of the virus is close to one in much of the UK – close to the crucial threshold above which growth is exponential.

The experts at the MRC Biostatistics Unit in Cambridge combined the increase with a relaxation of the block, the Daily Telegraph reported.

Despite the warnings, Boris Johnson was asked not to panic over the fear of a summer flood. Former conservative leader Sir Iain Duncan Smith said ministers should continue their efforts to get the economy going by asking more workers to return to the office. He said: “The government's message is still very fearful, it has to be much more nuanced.

"You have to say," Look, this is a disease that broadly affects people with comorbidities. Protect the vulnerable, but the rest of you should get back to work. & # 39; Sir Iain added: "We seem to have lost the ability to balance the risk."

In the meantime, health officials said concerns about a new surge were "very high". Niall Dickson, chief executive of the NHS confederation, told the all-party faction Coronavirus that non-covid productivity in NHS trusts is currently around 60 percent.

He called for an Amazon-style way for health and care workers to order personal protective equipment where it arrives the next day. Dr. Chaand Nagpaul, chairman of the British Medical Association's council, said a further surge should not be seen as "inevitable" and it was time to be "more robust" to mitigate the threat.

He also called for more precise public news about measures that people can take to stop the virus from spreading.

"When I look at something as simple as our social distance messages, we are told that the social distance is still two meters or one meter plus," he said.

"Do you think a member of the public understands what a meter plus means? What does the plus mean? Many do not really understand this because it is not clear and they have no social distance. & # 39;

Britain's coronavirus cases increase 14% in a week as experts urge ministers not to panic and say Britain needs to learn to live with the disease – while officials announce 83 more Covid-19 deaths

The number of Covid 19 cases in the UK has increased again. The average number of infections rose 14 percent in a week as scientists urged ministers not to panic and said Britain needed to learn to live with the disease.

Ministry of Health chiefs announced that another 763 people tested positive for the virus, bringing the rolling seven-day average to 726. By comparison, the rate was 697 yesterday, 638 last Wednesday, and has been on the rise for a fortnight, fearing a resurgence.

And the rate is 33 percent higher than the four-month low of 546 that hit three weeks ago on July 8, just a few days after top experts warned of an inevitable surge triggered by the loosening of strict blocking rules.

Professor James Naismith, director of the Rosalind Franklin Institute, argued that Britain was never free from infections and warned that "the number of cases measured today is not comparable to March."

Business leaders reacted cautiously to the threat of stricter restrictions that were introduced as the cases progressed. Top companies said it was "vital" that crippled economies had a chance to recover this summer.

The latest figures show that the number of new cases in Spain is increasing rapidly. At the weekend, 6,361 new cases were announced, compared to 4,581 the previous year. France announced 2,551 new coronavirus cases on Monday

The latest figures show that the number of new cases in Spain is increasing rapidly. At the weekend, 6,361 new cases were announced, compared to 4,581 the previous year. France announced 2,551 new coronavirus cases on Monday

OLDHAM TAKES over LEICESTER AT THE SECOND HIGHEST COVID-19 INFECTION RATE

Oldham has overtaken Leicester with the second highest Covid 19 infection rate in England, according to official figures.

According to NHS statistics, Oldham recorded 54.3 coronavirus cases per 100,000 people between July 20 and 26.

The weekly infection rate for the city of Greater Manchester has increased by 191 percent. In comparison, the Leicester eruption fell slightly to 53.2.

Only Blackburn with Darwen is currently worse affected than Oldham. Last week, 85.9 cases per 100,000 people were recorded in the region.

Local officials have asked locals to adhere to the strict restrictions introduced yesterday to prevent a complete ban.

The council chairmen have now asked all 235,000 residents of the district not to let visitors into their home for at least two weeks.

It is bringing Oldham into conflict with the rest of England after the lockout rules were relaxed earlier this month so people can stay overnight with their loved ones.

Anyone living in the Greater Manchester area was asked to be two meters from friends and family when they saw them outside.

Current government recommendations for the rest of the nation recommend a one-meter-plus rule – but people should be two meters apart if possible.

Katrina Stephens, director of public health in Oldham, said the increase was not a result of further testing, but of a "real increase" in transmission, the Manchester Evening News reported.

Central and western districts are largely affected, and there are "increasing" cases among the younger population, particularly those aged 20-40, Ms. Stephens said at a press conference yesterday.

A significant proportion of the recent cases affect several people who have tested positive within one household.

Councilor Arooj Shah confirmed that cases in Oldham's Pakistani and Bangladeshi communities have increased, accounting for up to two-thirds of all new cases, New Post Leader reported.

Around 20 percent of Oldham's population comes from Bangladesh and Pakistan, compared to the average of 2.8 percent in England and Wales.

Officials noted that the new guidelines for the Muslim community, which was preparing to celebrate Friday's oath, would be "particularly stringent."

A further 83 coronavirus deaths have now been recorded in the UK, bringing the official death toll to 45,961. However, no deaths were recorded in Scotland and Northern Ireland.

On average, around 66 people die of the disease every day. However, the death curve is no longer leveling off as quickly as the rate has hardly changed in the past 10 days. Patients can take several weeks to die, which means that an increase in government deaths is not immediately apparent.

Government statistics show that the official size of the UK outbreak is now 300,692.

The actual size of the outbreak that got out of control in March is estimated at millions based on antibody test data.

The deaths reported by the Ministry of Health affect all cases, including hospitals and nursing homes.

The data doesn't indicate how many Covid-19 patients have died within the past 24 hours – it's just how many deaths have been reported and registered with the authorities.

And the number doesn't always match the home country updates. Department of Health officials are working on a different time limit, which means that daily updates from Scotland and Northern Ireland are always out of sync.

And the NHS England census every afternoon, which only takes hospital deaths into account, doesn't match the DH numbers because they use a different recording system.

For example, some deaths announced by NHS England chiefs have already been counted by the Department of Health, which records deaths "as soon as they are available".

NHS England recorded 14 deaths in hospitals across the country. These include victims who have both been confirmed and suspected of being infected with the virus, while the Ministry of Health only records laboratory-confirmed Covid 19 deaths.

Wales reported five deaths in all situations after two days without deaths. The country has reported no deaths on 13 days this month because the virus is slow to fail.

Department of Health numbers showed that nearly 100,000 tests were either performed or released yesterday. The number includes front-end antibody testing for NHS and caregivers.

The head of the British Medical Association, Dr. Chaand Nagpaul warned that Britain was not doing enough to prevent a second wave of the epidemic.

He urged ministers to develop a coherent strategy on how to prevent Covid-19's resurgence from afflicting the UK in winter when other diseases are common and the NHS is prone to overwork.

Dr. Nagpaul said at a meeting of the All Party Group on coronavirus: "We are not doing everything we can to contain the virus at the moment.

“When I look at something as simple as our messages about social distance: We are told that social distance is still two meters or one meter plus.

"Do you think a member of the public understands what a meter plus means? What does the plus mean? Many do not really understand this because it is not clear and they have no social distance. & # 39;

Dr. Nagpaul struck the ministers for not having forced them to wear masks and said this risked sending the message that they were voluntary.

He added: “If you want to suppress a virus, don't just make an announcement and then let people free to carry it. You then take a very systematic approach to ensure that this happens.

“What I mean by oppression is that you take an attitude that says: We want to do absolutely everything to ensure that the infection does not spread. This requires a much more robust approach. & # 39;

Oldham overtook Leicester with the second highest Covid 19 infection rate in England. Between July 20 and July 26, 54.3 coronavirus cases were registered per 100,000 people. In comparison, the Leicester eruption fell slightly to 53.2. Only Blackburn with Darwen is currently worse affected than Oldham. Last week, 85.9 cases per 100,000 people were recorded in the region

Oldham overtook Leicester with the second highest Covid 19 infection rate in England. Between July 20 and July 26, 54.3 coronavirus cases were registered per 100,000 people. In comparison, the Leicester eruption fell slightly to 53.2. Only Blackburn with Darwen is currently worse affected than Oldham. Last week, 85.9 cases per 100,000 people were recorded in the region

£ 4MILLION FUNDING TO EXAMINE BAME AND COVID-19-LINK

Scientists have received £ 4.3m to investigate why blacks and Asians die more often from Covid-19.

UK Research and Innovation and the National Institute for Health Research have funded six new research projects examining the relationship between coronavirus and ethnicity.

New evidence suggests that BAME people (black and ethnic minorities) die almost twice as often from Covid-19 as whites, taking into account the age of the people and other socio-demographic factors.

The six projects are:

  • The effects of Sars-Cov-2, the virus that causes Covid-19, will be studied specifically for migrant and refugee groups.
  • Another will look for ways to use key voices in BAME communities to create targeted digital health messages.
  • The £ 2.1m UK Reach project, which has received most of the fund, will calculate the risk of ethnic minority health workers contracting and dying from Covid-19.
  • One of the research projects aims to determine the risk of infection and death from Covid-19 in individual ethnic groups. It will combine over 40 million patient records in England to create one of the UK's largest Covid 19 cohorts.
  • Another project uses data from the British biobank that contains biomedical information from 500,000 people to investigate whether the increased risk of developing heavy Covid-19 in minority ethnic groups is due to differences in health status, lifestyle behavior such as physical activity, etc. can be explained. and environmental factors such as social inequality.
  • The final research project is intended to enable clinical trial designers to consider factors that may reduce the involvement of BAME participants, such as: B. Culture or study information and procedures.

He warned, “The point is that I am not sure whether a feeling of a clear, determined determination to do everything we can is done, and I mean by oppression.

"To really take the stance that we can live normally again – you can go out, you can do things, but make sure that we have very clear messages about what is expected of both the public and the workers around to stop the spread.

“There are measures that can be taken and at the moment I see too many examples of a possible spread. I just go to the high street and look through the shop windows.

“If a hairdresser wears a visor without a mask, the virus is not suppressed. Has this message been sent to all employers, what needs to be done to stop the virus from spreading?

& # 39; If you look at the numbers at the moment, the last ONS numbers from last Friday, the weekly numbers, the infection rate has increased.

“We are now seeing around 2,700 new cases a day compared to 2,500 the week before. I think the time has come when we have to be much more robust and strict to reduce the spread. & # 39;

It comes after Boris Johnson has warned that there are "signs of a second wave" of Covid-19 in Europe when the Prime Minister defended Britain's decision to reintroduce quarantine rules for Spanish travel.

Leading experts insisted that ministers do not have to panic about rising coronavirus cases in the UK after it became known that Boris Johnson feared a second wave could begin in 14 days.

A senior government source told the mail that the prime minister was "extremely concerned" with outbreaks that "bubble up" both at home and across Europe. There was an increase in infections in Spain, which triggered the last minute decision to put the vacation hotspot on the UK quarantine list for travel, Germany and France.

A Downing Street source said, "The Prime Minister is extremely concerned about what he sees abroad and fears that we could see the same thing here in a fortnight.

“People have to realize that we are still in the middle of a pandemic. He wants to open things up and get people back to work, but he knows that if something goes wrong it will be his head on the block. & # 39;

But Professor Paul Hunter, an infectious disease specialist at the University of East Anglia, calmed the nation and said, "Give us a couple of weeks before we panic."

He said that MailOnline cases in the UK are getting faster, but not escalating quickly, and that it is possible that we can survive August without taking general measures to prevent another crisis.

A scientist warned that the surge was "to be expected" as the ban was lifted earlier this month when millions of Britons flocked to pubs on July 4th to celebrate "Super Saturday".

Professor James Naismith, director of the Rosalind Franklin Institute, said: “Britain has never been free from infections. There have been hundreds of cases a day since March. However, the number of cases measured is not comparable to March.

& # 39; The number of cases was expected to increase as the blockage subsides and the spread of the virus increases.

"The government intervention that makes the biggest difference in suppressing this flare is isolating positive cases."

The head of the British Medical Association says the government is NOT doing enough to stop a second wave and sends "mixed messages" about masks and social distancing

The British government is not doing enough to stop a second wave of coronavirus, the head of the British Medical Association warned of fears that the virus could make a comeback.

Dr. Chaand Nagpaul told MPs that mixed news about important preventive measures such as wearing masks and social distancing has led to an almost 30 percent increase in infections over the past week.

He urged ministers to develop a coherent strategy on how to prevent Covid-19's resurgence from afflicting the UK in winter when other diseases are common and the NHS is prone to overwork.

Dr. Nagpaul said at a meeting of the All Party Group on coronavirus: "We are not doing everything we can to contain the virus at the moment.

“When I look at something as simple as our messages about social distance: We are told that social distance is still two meters or one meter plus.

"Do you think a member of the public understands what a meter plus means? What does the plus mean? Many do not really understand this because it is not clear and they have no social distance. & # 39;

Dr. Nagpaul struck the ministers for not having forced them to wear masks and said this risked sending the message that they were voluntary.

He added: “If you want to suppress a virus, don't just make an announcement and then let people free to carry it. You then take a very systematic approach to ensure that this happens.

“What I mean by oppression is that you take an attitude that says: We want to do absolutely everything to ensure that the infection does not spread. This requires a much more robust approach. & # 39;

He warned, “The point is that I am not sure whether a feeling of a clear, determined determination to do everything we can is done, and I mean by oppression.

"To really take the stance that we can live normally again – you can go out, you can do things, but make sure that we have very clear messages about what is expected of both the public and the workers around to stop the spread.

“There are measures that can be taken and at the moment I see too many examples of a possible spread. I just go to the high street and look through the shop windows.

“If a hairdresser wears a visor without a mask, the virus is not suppressed. Has this message been sent to all employers, what needs to be done to stop the virus from spreading?

& # 39; If you look at the numbers at the moment, the last ONS numbers from last Friday, the weekly numbers, the infection rate has increased.

“We are now seeing around 2,700 new cases a day compared to 2,500 the week before. I think the time has come when we have to be much more robust and strict to reduce the spread. & # 39;

“I am still concerned that insufficient efforts have been made to take isolation measures. It is self-destructive to slander young people who are contagious but are otherwise good at not wanting to continue to make disproportionate financial and lifelong sacrifices. & # 39;

He added: “I'm afraid if we don't control this flare, we will start the winter months with a high percentage of circulating viruses.

& # 39; With normal winter diseases and better indoor living, we were then able to see a return to exponential growth in Covid-19 cases that overwhelmed the NHS and required complete closure. Many scientists have repeatedly stressed that we only have a short time to prepare our systems to prevent this. & # 39;

Ministers have warned of a possible second wave of the pandemic this winter, but fear that it may occur earlier. During a visit to Nottingham yesterday, Mr Johnson, who downplayed the prospect of another national ban earlier this month, said the British should not be on guard.

He added: "The important thing is that everyone in all communities follows the advice, follows the advice, does not accidentally spread it, and puts it down properly, and we will be able to relax restrictions across the country.

"But I'm afraid we are now clearly facing the risk of a second wave in other parts of Europe and we just have to be vigilant."

A video of a pub in Staffordshire, in which around 200 people are crammed "like sardines" in a beer garden in a clear violation of the corona virus rules, suggests that some Brits have actually dropped their watch.

The market community is fighting a coronavirus outbreak linked to the local pub, which has infected at least ten people.

Punters and staff who were at the Crown and Anchor in Stone between July 16 and 18 are now asked to make swabs urgently, as well as anyone who has been in close contact with visitors to the pub.

A new test center was set up in a parking lot 350 meters away, and people who had been in Stone on those evenings and who had been showing symptoms since then, even though they did not go to the pub, should now also get a test.

Local resident Ayrron Robinson, who has lived across the street from Stone for four years, filmed the clip out of his window after worrying about an apparent lack of social distance.

He said: "If we have to close on site, the pub has a lot of responsibility."

Several locations in England are carefully monitored by health officials who are trying to suppress cases after a recent surge, including Leicester, Oadby and Wigston, Blackburn and Darwen, and Luton.

Oldham overtook Leicester and had the second highest Covid-19 infection rate in England. Between July 20 and July 26, 54.3 coronavirus cases were registered per 100,000 people.

The weekly infection rate for the city of Greater Manchester has increased by 191 percent. In comparison, the Leicester eruption fell slightly to 53.2.

Only Blackburn with Darwen is currently worse affected than Oldham. Last week, 85.9 cases per 100,000 people were recorded in the region.

Local officials have asked the locals to abide by the strict restrictions introduced yesterday to prevent a complete ban like Leicester.

Two thirds of the new Covid 19 cases in Oldham affect Pakistani and Bangladeshi communities, the council said, and a significant proportion of the recent cases involve multiple people who tested positive within one household.

Scientists receive £ 4.3m to investigate why blacks and Asians die more often from Covid-19.

UK Research and Innovation and the National Institute for Health Research have funded six new research projects examining the relationship between coronavirus and ethnicity.

New evidence suggests that BAME people (black and ethnic minorities) die almost twice as often from Covid-19 as whites, taking into account the age of the people and other socio-demographic factors.

Professor Chris Whitty, Chief Medical Officer for England and Head of the National Institute for Health Research, said: “Given the evidence that people with black, Asian and ethnic minorities are more affected by Covid-19, it is important that we understand what factors drive this risk to tackle it effectively?

& # 39; The diverse projects funded will help to examine this link in detail so that new treatment methods and approaches can be developed to target the most vulnerable ethnic groups.

"This research will have anchored patient and public participation in black, Asian and ethnic minorities at all stages of the research."

Bei anderen Entwicklungen im Kampf gegen Covid-19 wurde in Großbritannien ein Vertrag über mehrere Millionen Pfund für 60 Millionen Dosen eines weiteren potenziellen Covid-19-Impfstoffs abgeschlossen – der vierte bisher.

Aufgrund der Vereinbarung von Nummer 10 mit den Pharmagiganten GlaxoSmithKline und Sanofi Pasteur hat Großbritannien Zugang zu insgesamt 250 Millionen Dosen – genug, um jedem in Großbritannien die Möglichkeit zu geben, jeweils vier zu erhalten, wenn er arbeitet.

Scientists have not yet tested the GSK / Sanofi vaccine on humans, and studies showing that it works won't start until September. Other competitors bought by number 10 have already shown promising signs in tests.

The government's deal with GSK / Sanofi is said to cost £ 500m, the Sunday Times reported earlier this month, which will be paid gradually as the vaccine goes through clinical trials.

Phase 3 trials – the final testing phase before it can be approved for human use – are not expected to be achieved by December.

Europa hatte auf dem Höhepunkt des Ausbruchs des Coronavirus eine „Übersterblichkeit“ von 50% – in Spanien war ein Anstieg von 155% gegenüber 11% in Deutschland zu verzeichnen.

Nach Angaben des französischen Statistikamtes Insee war in Europa auf dem Höhepunkt des Ausbruchs des Coronavirus ein Anstieg der Übersterblichkeit um 50 Prozent zu verzeichnen.

Die Zahlen zeigen, dass in den europäischen Ländern innerhalb einer Woche zwischen dem 30. März und dem 6. April mehr als 33.742 Todesfälle zu verzeichnen waren.

Übersterblichkeit ist die Anzahl der Todesfälle in einem bestimmten Zeitraum, die über die normalerweise zu erwartenden Werte hinausgeht, und wird häufig verwendet, um abzuschätzen, wie viele Menschen aufgrund von Covid-19 gestorben sind.

Spanien verzeichnete mit 155 Prozent die höchste Übersterblichkeit in dieser Woche, nachdem 12.545 Todesfälle im Übermaß verzeichnet worden waren.

In dieser Zeit folgten Italien, Belgien und Frankreich, was laut Insee "der Höhepunkt der Übersterblichkeit … im Zusammenhang mit der COVID-19-Epidemie" in Europa war.

Nach Angaben des französischen Statistikamtes Insee war in Europa auf dem Höhepunkt des Ausbruchs des Coronavirus ein Anstieg der Übersterblichkeit um 50 Prozent zu verzeichnen. Spanien verzeichnete zwischen dem 30. März und dem 6. April mit 155 Prozent die höchste Übersterblichkeit

Nach Angaben des französischen Statistikamtes Insee war in Europa auf dem Höhepunkt des Ausbruchs des Coronavirus ein Anstieg der Übersterblichkeit um 50 Prozent zu verzeichnen. Spanien verzeichnete zwischen dem 30. März und dem 6. April mit 155 Prozent die höchste Übersterblichkeit

Deutschland, das bevölkerungsreichste Land Westeuropas, wies im gleichen Zeitraum eine vergleichsweise viel niedrigere Sterblichkeitsrate auf.

In der Studie wurden keine Daten aus Großbritannien erwähnt, das die höchste Zahl an Todesfällen durch Coronaviren in Europa aufweist, da es nicht mehr Mitglied der Europäischen Union ist.

Frühere Zahlen des Amtes für nationale Statistiken haben England und Wales jedoch in einem ähnlichen Zeitraum zu den am stärksten betroffenen Ländern gemacht.

In den Vorjahren ist die Zahl der Todesfälle in Europa ab März nach der jährlichen Grippesaison tendenziell zurückgegangen.

Die Insee-Agentur sagte jedoch, dass die Zahl im Jahr 2020 aufgrund der von der EU-Agentur Eurostat aus 21 nationalen Gerichtsbarkeiten im Rahmen der Coronavirus-Pandemie gesammelten Daten stark gestiegen sei.

In Italien wurden 7.669 Todesfälle mehr verzeichnet. wo 7.669 übermäßige Todesfälle registriert wurden.

Italien verzeichnete einen Anstieg der Sterblichkeitsrate um 67 Prozent, wobei das Land in der festgelegten Woche 7.669 Todesfälle verzeichnete. Im Bild: Medizinisches Personal, das Coronavirus-Patienten auf der Intensivstation des Krankenhauses Papa Giovanni XXIII in Bergamo, Italien, behandelt

Im Vergleich zu den Daten für die Jahre 2016 bis 2019 hatte Spanien mit 155 Prozent die höchste Übersterblichkeit in dieser Woche, nachdem es 12.545 Todesfälle verzeichnet hatte.

Es folgten 91 Prozent in Belgien mit 1.908 Todesfällen und 67 Prozent in Italien, wo 7.669 Todesfälle verzeichnet wurden.

Frankreich war mit einem Anstieg der Sterblichkeitsrate um 60 Prozent am stärksten betroffen, nachdem 7.327 zusätzliche Todesfälle gemeldet worden waren, sagte der Insee.

Deutschland hatte eine vergleichsweise viel niedrigere Sterblichkeitsrate von nur 11 Prozent mit 2.076 Todesfällen im gleichen Zeitraum.

In der Studie wurden keine Daten aus Großbritannien erwähnt, aber zuvor vom ONS veröffentlichte Zahlen zeigten, dass es in England und Wales in einem ähnlichen Zeitraum 6.082 Todesfälle gab – 59 Prozent über dem Durchschnitt.

Spanien hatte mit 155 Prozent die höchste Übersterblichkeit in dieser Woche, nachdem es 12.545 Todesfälle verzeichnet hatte. Im Bild: Temporäres Krankenhaus für Covid-19-Patienten im Ifema-Kongress- und Ausstellungszentrum in Madrid, Spanien, nach dem Höhepunkt der Pandemie

Spain had the highest excess mortality in that week, with 155 per cent, after recording 12,545 excess deaths. Pictured: Temporary hospital for Covid-19 patients located at the Ifema convention and exhibition centre in Madrid, Spain, following the peak of the pandemic

The overall excess mortality rate for Europe was 48 per cent following 33,742 excess deaths.

The upward trend in excess mortality rates decreased progressively across Europe and all but disappeared by the beginning of May.

Over a longer period, from March 2 to April 26, the Insee said more than 80 per cent of the excess mortality jointly registered in 21 European countries was from Spain, Italy, Belgium and France.

As a whole, more men than women died, the data showed, and these were mostly people aged 70 and older.

It noted a series of marked differences in excess mortality between countries and even between regions within countries.

These were likely due to differences in population age and density, access to healthcare, the timing and method of lifting confinement measures, and the ability to work from home, according to the Insee, though it could not say which factors played the biggest role.

Lockdown free Sweden seeing 'very positive' downward trend in cases

Sweden is seeing a 'very positive' downward trend in coronavirus cases after its much-debated decision not to go into lockdown, its top epidemiologist says.

Anders Tegnell said the number of seriously sick patients was 'close to zero' with the curve of new virus cases also bending downwards.

Tegnell is also continuing to play down the effectiveness of face masks – saying there is 'no point' wearing them on public transport.

Sweden recorded only 1,716 new cases last week, down from 9,094 just a month earlier, and deaths have also been on the decline.

'The curves go down, and the curves over the seriously ill begin to be very close to zero. As a whole, it is very positive,' Tegnell said.

Measured by cases per million people, Sweden now has a similar infection rate to the UK and a much better one than the US

Measured by cases per million people, Sweden now has a similar infection rate to the UK and a much better one than the US

Sweden became a closely-watched outlier in the spring after refusing to go into lockdown, with shops and restaurants staying open throughout the crisis.

Large gatherings were banned along with visits to nursing homes, but primary schools stayed open even in hard-hit Stockholm.

Citizens have largely complied with social distancing recommendations and the government says that its softer measures will be easier to maintain long-term.

On Monday, Sweden announced just 398 new cases over the weekend, down from 767 the week before and 2,530 only a month ago.

Measured by cases per million people, Sweden now has a similar infection rate to the UK and a much better one than the US.

Only a handful of people are now being admitted to intensive care per week, down from as many as 45 per day at the height of the crisis.

Sweden's top epidemiologist Anders Tegnell (pictured on Tuesday) said the number of seriously sick patients was 'close to zero' with the curve of new virus cases also bending down

Sweden's top epidemiologist Anders Tegnell (pictured on Tuesday) said the number of seriously sick patients was 'close to zero' with the curve of new virus cases also bending down

Deaths have also fallen, with 56 fatalities announced in the last week compared to 101 in the previous seven days.

However, Sweden's death toll of 5,702 is well above that in Denmark, Norway and Finland, which have each seen fewer than 1,000 deaths.

In addition, Sweden has found itself marginalised as European countries re-open their borders for summer holidays.

The UK Foreign Office continues to advise against non-essential travel to Sweden, but has lifted that warning for the other Scandinavian countries.

The mixed results have prompted Swedish officials to promise an investigation into the country's coronavirus response.

The commission has a broad mandate to look at how the virus arrived in Sweden, how it spread, the government's response, and the effect on equality.

The commission will report on elderly care at the end of November, although its final conclusions are not due until 2022, ahead of a national election.

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