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If you cuddle your dog or cat, you can get coronavirus


If you cuddle your dog or cat, you can get coronavirus. Government scientists warn of concerns that animals may carry the virus on their fur

  • Official report from the UK's top veterinarian says pets can carry the virus on their fur
  • According to the report, close contact with your pet, such as cuddling, could spread the virus
  • This means that a pet can spread the virus from one person to another
  • Here's how you can help people affected by Covid-19

Cuddling your dog or cat could cause coronavirus, government scientists have warned.

An official report from the UK's top veterinarian says that pets may have the virus on their fur, which can cause the disease to spread from person to person.

It says: "Close contact such as cuddling, grooming, feeding and sharing food with animals could enable viruses to be transmitted."

That is, if a household member has the virus, the pet can pass it on to another family member.

An official report from the UK's top veterinarian says that pets may have the virus on their fur, which can cause the disease to spread from person to person. Pictured: Photo of a woman petting her pet cat

The UK veterinary chief's document was reviewed on April 30 at a meeting of the Government's Scientific Advisory Group on Emergency (SAGE).

The report warned that the virus could survive on pet skins, meaning that there is a plausible way in which the animal can act as a fomite (infectious object) for at least a few hours and transmit the virus to others around the home.

The document states that dogs and cats who have come into contact with a coronavirus patient are "high risk" for people with underlying conditions such as diabetes.

It advised animal owners with symptoms to prevent their dog or cat from coming into contact with "vulnerable people".

It says: “We consider the overall risk of such an animal in the household to be high if people live with underlying health problems or a poor immune system, but would otherwise be medium-sized.

“All risk management procedures that consider the presence of a pet companion in the home should ensure that the companion remains controlled to prevent contact with vulnerable people, especially considering underlying health issues such as diabetes, heart disease, and respiratory problems . Cancer or someone with a poor immune system. & # 39;

The report warned that the virus could survive on pet skins, meaning that there is a plausible way in which the animal can act as a fomite (infectious object) for at least a few hours and transmit the virus to others around the home. Image: Stock photo of a man cuddling his dog

The report warned that the virus could survive on pet skins, meaning that there is a plausible way in which the animal can act as a fomite (infectious object) for at least a few hours and transmit the virus to others around the home. Image: Stock photo of a man cuddling his dog

However, Professor James Wood, director of veterinary medicine at the University of Cambridge, insisted yesterday that it was "very unlikely" that owners of their pets could get coronavirus.

He said: “There is no reason for vulnerable people to stop cuddling their dog or cat. Everyone should maintain good hygiene standards with their pets and wash their hands throughout the day, as is generally recommended, to avoid the risk of them contaminating themselves. "

Professor Wood added that the risk to animals is low: “Although millions of people had COVID19, the number of pets found to be sick or infected is still low. Simply put, our dogs and cats can catch COVID19 from us if they live with us, but only in very rare cases. "

The SAGE document referred to cases of pets that tested positive for coronavirus, but said the risk of infected pets passing it on to humans was low.

It was said that two dogs, a 17-year-old Pomeranian and a German shepherd living in Hong Kong, had repeatedly been tested positive for coronavirus, and a cat from Belgium had also been tested positive.

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