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Hundreds of protesters flock to the streets of Belarus


Vladimir Putin threatens to intervene in Belarus to support "Europe's last dictator" Viktor Lukashenko, while 200,000 people flock to the streets to protest his "rigged" re-election

  • The people called flocked to the streets of Belarus and demanded the resignation of the president
  • President Viktor Lukashenko launched a brutal crackdown after gaining victory
  • Now the Kremlin wants to use a joint defense treaty with Belarus to intervene

Russia could intervene in Belarus to support the beleaguered president of the country as hundreds of thousands of people flocked to the streets to demand his resignation.

President Viktor Lukashenko, often referred to as the last dictator in Europe, has launched brutal crackdowns after winning what was widely regarded as firm.

Now the Kremlin intends to use a joint defense treaty with Belarus to intervene and quell the protests.

Hundreds of people flocked to the streets in Belarus on Sunday to call for the country's leader to resign

A group of protests march on the streets of Belarus after President Viktor Lukashenko launched brutal crackdowns following the election victory

A group of protests march on the streets of Belarus after President Viktor Lukashenko launched brutal crackdowns after the election victory

Protesters demonstrate in the Belarusian capital after the president won the victory

Protesters demonstrate in the capital of Belarus after the president won the victory

Lukashenko, 65, has called Russian President Vladimir Putin twice as fears of his being overthrown by the protests have grown.

The Belarusian president claims he won 80 percent of the vote in an election earlier this month, but the opposition said the vote has been pinned.

Up to 200,000 people took to the streets yesterday in the capital Minsk to demand Lukashenko's resignation.

In the days following the elections, police and security protests used extreme violence to stop demonstrations with mass arrests and beatings.

The demonstrations were called by Svetlana Tikhanovskaya, 37, the leading opposition candidate who claims to have won the election but has now fled to Lithuania for her own safety.

Workers in state-owned factories that manufacture worries and tractors went on strike Friday, though the president usually enjoyed strong support among state employees.

His 26-year reign is seriously threatened by the ongoing unrest, and the protests have been cited as the largest in the country's post-Soviet independence.

Russia stands ready to help and solve the problems that have arisen from outside pressure. Comments showing the Kremlin supports Lukashenko and his claims that the protests are part of a Western conspiracy to oust him.

A woman holds up a poster after the Belarusian president claimed he won 80 percent of the vote in an election earlier this month

A woman holds up a poster after the Belarusian president claimed he won 80 percent of the vote in an election earlier this month

Hundreds of people march through the streets demanding the resignation of the president

Hundreds of people march through the streets calling for the president to resign

During a rally in Minsk, Belarus, a crowd of people raise their hands and raise the Belarusian flag

During a rally in Minsk, Belarus, a crowd of people raise their hands and raise the Belarusian flag

Hundreds of protesters take to the streets to protest against the Belarusian presidential election in 2020

Hundreds of protesters take to the streets to protest against the Belarusian presidential election in 2020

He has claimed that Poland, Latvia and Lithuania are involved in "building military power" on the country's borders, and in response, his regime has announced military exercises near the Lithuanian border.

Yesterday he said: & # 39; NATO troops are at our gates. Lithuania, Latvia, Poland and our homeland Ukraine order us to hold new elections.

Mr Lukashenko added that Belarus would "die as a state" if new polls were held.

He said, "I never betrayed you and I never will."

Protesters raise their hands as they take part in a rally in front of the Minsk government building

Protesters raise their hands as they take part in a rally in front of the Minsk government building

Hundreds of protesters march through the capital of Belarus after the presidential elections

Hundreds of protesters march through the capital of Belarus after the presidential elections

In addition to the rally in Minsk, thousands of people took part in protests against Lukashenko in other cities.

The Belarusian Interior Ministry said there were no arrests at the rallies, although local media reported that some people had been arrested.

Government officials, including some police officers and state television workers, have spoken out in favor of the protests, and some of the country's largest state plants, the backbone of Lukashenko's Soviet economic model, have been hit by protests and strikes.

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