ENTERTAINMENT

Hundreds of primary schools keep their gates closed


Boris Johnson prepared to close all schools today after teaching unions and school principals who had rallied en masse.

All UK teaching unions today called for classes in the classroom to be suspended until staff are vaccinated. In a joint statement, the leaders of the unions GMB, NAHT, NASUWT, NEU, UNISON and Unite have stated that they want "an immediate nationwide transition to distance learning for all students in elementary, secondary and special schools and colleges".

On a visit to a London hospital to see the launch of Oxford University / AstraZeneca Covid-19 new vaccine, Mr Johnson hinted that secondary schools may be closed longer if closings are reviewed before Jan 18 – and insisted that teachers were at greater risk from Covid No than anyone else working during the pandemic.

“We'll have to take a very careful look at what we're doing with secondary schools later in the month. Closing primary schools is the last resort for all of us. So we're looking at everything we can do to avoid this. I would stress that schools are safe and the risk to children is very, very low, ”he said.

The Prime Minister added: “The risk for teachers and of course we will do everything we can to protect teachers, but the risk for teachers is no greater than for others. The reasons I want to keep schools open are very, very powerful in my opinion. & # 39;

All schools in London are closed today, along with most Covid-19 hotspots in Essex, Kent, East Sussex, Buckinghamshire and Hertfordshire after a dictation from the Department of Education took place last week. But principals who are supposed to stay open in areas like Surrey, Gloucestershire, Newcastle, Norfolk, Liverpool, County Durham, West Sussex, Sheffield, Wolverhampton, Leeds and Lancashire have closed anyway.

Rumors are growing that the government will soon collapse and close all schools in another embarrassing U-turn for Education Secretary Gavin Williamson when the NEW union said that 6,000 elementary schools still open today have been officially classified as "unsafe" by staff & # 39 ; to get to work and keep parents excited to see if their school is about to close.

School closings will send millions of children to "inferior" online learning experts who say they can "reset" childhood years, especially those from working-class families, while Ofsted chief inspector Amanda Spielman has warned schools not to re-open children Close to "take leave".

Parents checked out on social media this morning, describing their fear of caring for their children at home for the eleventh hour while trying to keep a full-time job, with many calling the schools unilateral decision to close "Staggering" criticized.

Northfield St. Nicholas Primary Academy in Lowestoft, Suffolk announced that it is closing on Facebook, with parents Rebecca Kane venting: “Nice to have a friend find out about this at 8:30 pm. I can't say I'm surprised. & # 39;

Other parents around the country said they were afraid for their children because for many homeschooling in the first lockdown last year meant "here do your schedules" and "no actual classes".

The chaos in the schools came like this:

  • Matt Hancock hints at even stricter restrictions, admitting new pressures to fight runaway mutant Covid will last MONTHS – with vaccines our only hope of escape;
  • The 82-year-old dialysis patient is the first Briton to receive Oxford's Covid bite as Mr Hancock welcomes the "crucial moment" in the war on the virus.
  • Coronavirus vaccines may be ineffective against the highly infectious South African mutation, warned a scientist who helped develop the Oxford sting.
  • The UK recorded an additional 54,990 coronavirus cases in a 24-hour period yesterday – the sixth straight day that daily infections exceeded 50,000.
  • The number of beds occupied by Covid patients rose in the eight days from Christmas by the equivalent of "12 full hospitals," according to NHS figures.

Boris Johnson (pictured today at Chase Farm Hospital in north London) said he had "no doubt" that the classrooms were safe, but many school principals ignored him and closed anyway, suggesting the Prime Minister is now in secondary school could close in February

Children are entering Manor Park School and Kindergarten in Knutsford, Cheshire, while schools across England are returning after the Christmas break - but unions are demanding that all schools close immediately

Children are entering Manor Park School and Kindergarten in Knutsford, Cheshire, while schools across England are returning after the Christmas break – but unions are demanding that all schools close immediately

Euan Stanton, a seventh grade student at a secondary school in Ashford, Kent, is studying at home as many schools are moving to online learning for at least a fortnight starting today

Euan Stanton, a seventh grade student at a secondary school in Ashford, Kent, is studying at home as many schools are moving to online learning for at least a fortnight starting today

John Murphy, CEO of Oasis Community Learning, unpacks COVID-19 test kits and rubber gloves at the Oasis Academy Coulsdon in south London today. Every secondary school and university today receives 1,000 test kits in the mail. Students are instructed to wipe themselves under supervision on their return

John Murphy, CEO of Oasis Community Learning, unpacks COVID-19 test kits and rubber gloves at the Oasis Academy Coulsdon in south London today. Every secondary school and university today receives 1,000 test kits in the mail. Students are instructed to wipe themselves under supervision on their return

But Lady Eleanor Holles School in Hampton closed today after all children in the capital were forced to study online

But Lady Eleanor Holles School in Hampton closed today after all children in the capital were forced to study online

School children make their way to primary school in Leeds

A parent hugs their daughter outside Manor Park School and Kindergarten in Knutsford, Cheshire.

Schoolchildren make their way to elementary schools in Leeds (left) and Cheshire (right) – but millions of children have been home for at least two weeks now

Naomi Carpenter, a 20-year-old sports rehab student at Hull University, is taking a swab for a side-flow Covid-19 test at campus sports facilities as students return to university

Naomi Carpenter, a 20-year-old sports rehab student at Hull University, is taking a swab for a side-flow Covid-19 test at campus sports facilities as students return to university

In the red area, the government has ordered that all schools be closed. In the areas in pink, the school principals are closed anyway

In the red area, the government has ordered that all schools be closed. In the areas in pink, the school principals are closed anyway

The schools announced that they would close at around eleven o'clock. The parents were angry and often heard the news secondhand

The schools announced that they would close at around eleven o'clock. The parents were angry and often heard the news secondhand

Official figures show there were an additional 54,990 laboratory-confirmed cases of coronavirus in the UK, an 80 percent increase from 30,501 last week, while the death toll rose 43 percent to 45 last Sunday

Official figures show there has been an additional 54,990 laboratory-confirmed cases of coronavirus in the UK, an 80 percent increase from 30,501 a year earlier, while the death toll rose 43 percent to 454 last Sunday

Where were schools closed in England by January 18th?

Closed by the government

London

All 32 districts

Essex

Brentwood

Epping forest

Lock point

Basildon

Rochford

Harlow

Chelmsford

Braintree

Maldon

Southend on Sea

Thurrock

Kent

Dartford

Gravesham

Seven oak

Medway

Ashford

Maidstone

Tonbridge and Malling

Tunbridge Wells

Swale

East Sussex

Hastings

Rother

Brighton

Buckinghamshire

Milton Keynes

Hertfordshire

Watford

Broxbourne

Hertsmere

Three rivers

Closed by principals

Rest of Essex

swamp

Surrey

Cheltenham

Newcastle

Leicester

Norfolk

Portsmouth

Liverpool

Buckinghamshire

County Durham

West Sussex

Sheffield

Cumbria

Bedford

Bristol

High Wycombe

Eastbourne

Wolverhampton

Leeds

Lancashire

TUC General Secretary Frances O & # 39; Grady said: “The Sage Government Council makes it clear that opening schools to all students can now increase the rate of infection. It's in nobody's interest.

"Instead of creating chaos for parents and exposing workers to risk, the prime minister should speak to unions about what steps are needed to ensure all schools are Covid-safe."

NASUWT General Secretary Dr. Patrick Roach called for a nationwide move to distance learning for all students.

He said, “NASUWT is fully committed to helping children get back to school as soon as possible.

“However, it is now very clear that the pandemic is seriously affecting the ability of all schools and colleges to continue to work normally.

"NASUWT calls for an immediate nationwide move to distance learning for all students in elementary, secondary and special schools and colleges."

The Prime Minister told families yesterday that children should return to school in whatever areas they should open today and tomorrow. But as Covid-19 rates rose, unions said a "snowball effect" closed dozen of schools despite official advice to stay open.

One mother said she was "amazing" that her child's elementary school didn't open on Tuesday and wanted the school to listen to academics rather than unions.

The woman, who does not wish to be named, received an email on Sunday afternoon from the headmaster of Anlaby Elementary School in East Yorkshire advising her not to return to school on Tuesday.

She told Hull Live that online at-home learning was "not good enough," adding, "I find it amazing how the school chooses not to have a government council – I'm really not worried about what their union is thinks.

“I take my advice from government scientists who say it is safe for children to return to school, and so is school.

"There were no classes, it was just 'make your schedule here' and there were no actual classes that caused massive stress in the household, as I not only had to teach my child but also had to work."

Childminder Juliet Voisey wrote online: 'Further information is required. I am a self-employed childminder. I haven't applied for a government grant for this period as I will be opening next week. There is a deadline to apply for the grant. & # 39;

A parent who chose to remain anonymous said she would not send her children to school due to her safety concerns about the coronavirus.

Suffering from severe asthma, the woman told the PA news agency that she could not risk her children bringing the virus home and so would teach her herself.

She said, “We've all managed not to catch Covid so far, but with this new strain I think it's not safe at all.

“We should never have been taken out of lock in the summer. The economy will recover over time, but people's lives will not. And you can't run an economy with the dead, can you?

“Human life is far more important than opening shops and restaurants.

"How can schools be safe when the parliament buildings are not safe?"

Some parents have expressed concern about sending their children back to school in an area where Covid infection rates are rising rapidly.

Children in Sunbury on Thames, Surrey, were returning as usual, while less than three miles away in the London borough of Richmond, all elementary schools remained closed despite a lower infection rate.

In front of the school gates of St. Ignatius Catholic Primary School in the Surrey district of Spelthorne, anxious parents dropped their children in front of the school gates.

"My daughter was excited to be returning for her sophomore year, but I have my concerns," said Fernando Jardin.

“All schools in the neighboring London boroughs are closed, but the schools here in Sunbury are open.

The rate of infection in our Spelthorne neighborhood is similar to that in Richmond.

"I'm not sure how one school can stay open while others are closed."

Francesca Yaite admitted having mixed feelings about sending her daughter back to school after the Christmas break.

She said, “If I'm honest, I was worried about this day.

“The school was fantastic, but as a parent you have concerns but I agree to keep it open. It's so beneficial to the kids

Sophie Symes, a 7th grade student at Knutsford Academy in Cheshire, is studying at home as many schools switch to online learning

Boris Johnson visits Chase Farm Hospital and welcomes a retiree who has been given the Covid-19 vaccine as he faces mounting pressure to close schools and impose a new national lockdown

Boris Johnson visits Chase Farm Hospital and welcomes a retiree who has been given the Covid-19 vaccine as he faces mounting pressure to close schools and impose a new national lockdown

Every school was closed three miles away in the Hampton. It was the same picture in the neighboring London borough of Hounslow.

PM refuses to rule out the possibility of exams being canceled

Boris Johnson has refused to rule out the cancellation of GCSE and A-level exams this year.

When asked about the possibility, the Prime Minister said: “We have to be realistic, we have to be realistic about how quickly this new variant has spread …

"We have to be realistic about the impact this will have on our NHS … and we have to be humble in the face of this virus."

While the primary schools have been closed by order of the Education Secretary, the secondary schools are due next week with a staggered start for the students.

Latest data shows that the Richmond County has an infection rate of 550 per 100,000 people, while Spelthorne has an infection rate of 669 per 1,000,000.

A mother waving goodbye to her daughter in St. Ignatius said the government should have closed all schools.

"It doesn't make sense if two neighboring counties have different policies," said the mother of two, who asked not to be named.

“The virus doesn't stop at borders. People go about their daily lives so that the virus can be easily transmitted. & # 39;

A father who held his five-year-old son's hand as he led him to the school gates said he had been torturing himself over the weekend about sending his son back to the classroom.

"My son only started in September and he's living it," said the father.

& # 39; He wants to be with his friends. They're kept in a bubble at school, but with this new variant there's a lot more to worry about.

“If the government suddenly turns around and the grant deadline is up, I'll be out of my pocket. I don't want to claim money when I can work. & # 39;

Conservative former Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt has called for the closure of schools and borders and a ban on household mixing "immediately" when he warned that the pressures facing hospitals are "worse off-scale" than in previous winter crises.

The chairman of the Commons Health and Social Care Committee wrote on Twitter: “Time to act: Think about why we need to close schools and borders and prohibit all household mixing RIGHT AWAY.

“For those who argue, winter at the NHS is always like this: You're wrong. I faced four major winter crises as Health Sec, and the situation is now worse than any.

“It's true that we often had to cancel elective care in January to protect emergency care, but that too is under a lot of pressure as the record-breaking car is waiting for the sickest patients.

“More worryingly, there are fewer heart attack patients in intensive care units, perhaps because they don't dial 999 when they have to.

& # 39; Full credit to NHS for keeping cancer services open, but in wave 1 there was still a 2/3 decrease in cancer appts: people didn't see GPs or wanted to go to hospitals, with many potentially preventable cancer deaths. We were hoping to avoid this this time, but now we look unlikely. & # 39;

Schoolchildren go to school in Tier 4 Manchester today on the first day of a new semester

Schoolchildren go to school in Tier 4 Manchester today on the first day of a new semester

Rachel Allen, 40, is a single mother to Lewis, seven (pictured together) and runs a social media counseling from her Tier 4 home in Milton Keynes, Buckinghamshire. She says, "As a self-employed single parent trying to keep a business going that was decimated when the lockdown began, school is a lifeline for me."

Ella Brucher, 35, a self-employed cleaning lady, has two children, Scarlet, six, and Dominic, ten, (pictured together) in Purley, Level 4. Ms. Brucher said: “After she couldn't work at all, it's three months earlier in the year very difficult - and it is also difficult for the children. You want to be back in school. & # 39;

Rachel Allen, 40, is a single mother to Lewis, seven (pictured together) and runs a social media counseling from her Tier 4 home in Milton Keynes, Buckinghamshire. She says, "As a self-employed single parent trying to keep a business going that was decimated when the lockdown began, school is a lifeline for me." Ella Brucher, 35, a self-employed cleaning lady, has two children, Scarlet, six, and Dominic, ten, (pictured together) in Purley, Level 4. Ms. Brucher said: “After she couldn't work at all, it's three months earlier in the year very difficult – and it is also difficult for the children. You want to be back in school. & # 39;

Parents shared how they were told about school closings at the last minute

Parents shared how they were told about school closings at the last minute

Pinehurst Primary School in Anfield, Liverpool, announced this morning that they would not open as planned this week

Pinehurst Primary School in Anfield, Liverpool, announced this morning that they would not open as planned this week

Defiant main head: I will not close my school

A Tier 4 elementary school principal shared how he defied calls to keep the doors closed and welcomed the children back after the Christmas break.

Hethersett Primary School (pictured today) is one of only a handful of elementary schools in Norfolk. More than 110 others are closed, according to the district council, which left the decision to the school heads.

Chief Matthew Parslow-Williams spoke of the "terrible" situation in which parents are confronted with conflicting information from politicians and trade unions when they have difficulty combining work with childcare.

"It wasn't an easy decision," he told MailOnline. "We had to close the school two weeks before Christmas because there was an outbreak that hit seven of our ten bubbles."

“The unions are demanding that schools remain closed, but our staff made their own decisions and we took advice and weighed things up and decided to create a safe environment for the children to teach and decided to open up.

“I am a parent of two children myself and my wife protects me, so I fully understand people's concerns. It's a terrible dilemma for parents as prices go up.

"But we take strict precautions to minimize the risk and it is very important that children receive their education."

When asked if he believed the schools were likely to remain open, he said: "The Prime Minister sounded like a full closure was possible and we will of course have to switch to home learning if it does."

Covid rates in South Norfolk, where Hethersett is located, are the worst in the county at 410 cases per 100,000 population, slightly below the national average of 450 but up from 244 per thousand the previous week.

The parents who arrived at school today were full of praise for the way their children's school handled things during the pandemic.

The mother of two, Danielle Gilbert, 31, who is a general practitioner, said the school informed her "brilliantly".

"I have no qualms about letting my son go to school today," she said. Their four year old son James is at the school reception desk.

"I think it was confusing for parents with the mixed messages they are receiving at national level," she said, "and I think parents, especially those who work, need more than a day in advance to know whether schools are opened or closed. & # 39;

Ms. Gilbert, 31, whose husband is also a doctor, came to school with her 18-month-old daughter Lily on the back of her bike and James on his own bike.

"James loves school and he would have been very disappointed not to come in today," she said.

"I wouldn't be surprised if all schools close soon, but the school is very good at home teaching and I am confident that they will handle it well."

Hethersett Primary School parents Pauline and Tim Booth, who both work for Sainsbury's, were happy to see their seven-year-old son Brad attend school this morning.

"He was looking forward to it and wants to see his friends again, especially after the extra long Christmas break," said Tim, 40.

"The school kept us updated and we got a lot of support studying at home during the first lockdown," said 42-year-old Pauline.

“But you never know for sure if everything will go in, so it's definitely preferable to be in the classroom. My parents live nearby and although we could see them on Christmas Day, we didn't see much of them otherwise. & # 39;

Mom of two, Melissa Rollison, a 41-year-old human resources manager, said she was delighted that her nine-year-old daughter would be going back to school.

“I have an 11 year old son who is in high school so he's still gone and I work from home. I am confident that the school will handle things well, whether at school or at home, as we did before.

"You were able to help me a lot when we did that, but obviously it's better when she's actually in school."

Dianna Nicholas, 35, a mother from Castle Bromwich, Birmingham, with two children at Firs Academy, ages five and six, said, “My two children have learning difficulties so routine and structure are very important to them.

“You have been looking forward to going back to school all last week.

& # 39; For them interacting with friends and getting up in the morning and coming home the whole thing, I think they need it.

“There was so much uncertainty about it that everything was taken away from us last year.

“It's unfair to the children and to us as parents. I think they need a little normalcy.

"Your education is very important as both of me have autism and global developmental delays and it is very important to get them where they need to be."

Jahangir Ahmed, 51, of Castle Bromwich, Birmingham, who is third year old with an eight year old son, said: “Most parents are not happy to send their children to school after the new coronavirus strain begins.

“It's spreading so quickly and I heard in London that one of the schoolchildren who died was only eight years old.

& # 39; This school said that the 4th and 6th grades should not come because of Covid.

"I don't understand – apparently this coronavirus can't attack years 4 and 6?

“What about the others, what will happen to them?

“I've met so many parents who have said they don't have a choice because if they don't send their child to school they'll be fined.

“I know parents are not happy. I also think every single parent you ask will say the same thing. Didn't you have enough coronavirus deaths last time?

“And now the children will start trying.

“We're not happy, we want our children to be raised, but their lives are more important than anything else.

“If they are not going to live, what can they do with their education?

“I want you to decide. If you want to send the children in, send them all, not just some. Or just close the doors. & # 39;

Kuntaea You, 37, unemployed and from Castle Bromwich, Birmingham, has two sons, ages ten and nine. She said, “Some people say it is not safe but the school is open so we have to send our children to school today.

“I allow my children to go to school, but only one of my sons went in today.

“He's ten and fifth grade, but my other son is nine and didn't go to school because he's fourth grade and they didn't go in.

"I'm a little unsure, but I'm happy that my children are going to school today."

Athena Davidson, 35, a mother of four, a nursing assistant from Castle Bromwich, Birmingham, said: “If the government doesn't close the country and do what it is supposed to do, schools must remain open.

“But I think the government should just put a full lockdown as it becomes more difficult for parents who go to work.

“If the kids go in and someone in their class or a teacher has Covid, they have to isolate themselves for two weeks.

“But then that parent has to take time off so I don't think the government thinks about the people.

“I think they are all to themselves.

“I have four children and one on the way and two in school. One is nine years old in his fifth year and I have a five year old at the front desk.

“I just think the government needs to sort this out. You should just re-lock the land if necessary. & # 39;

Kent County Council Chairman Roger Gough urged Education Secretary Gavin Williamson to keep all elementary schools in the county closed. It is "very difficult to justify" to keep some schools open while others are closed.

Elementary school students in Thanet, Canterbury, Dover, Folkestone and Hythe are expected to return on Monday, while the other Kent counties will study remotely for the first two weeks of the semester.

Yesterday Council Presidents in Cumbria, Brighton, Birmingham and Wolverhampton officially asked for permission to allow schools in their area to remain closed.

While waiting for a response from Secretary of Education Gavin Williamson, Brighton and Hove City Councils have advised all school principals to shut down their schools, excluding vulnerable children and those of key workers, and to move learning online.

In Southampton, the city council warned that some schools "do not have enough staff to reopen safely to all children" while Slough Borough Council said some primaries would remain closed as the Department of Education was causing "general confusion".

Boris Johnson says despite Tory anger on warnings that must take months to fight the runaway mutant strain, a tougher Covid lockdown is imminent – with vaccines just hoping to escape

Boris Johnson gives a thumbs up as he has his temperature checked on a visit to Chase Farm Hospital in north London today while Oxford University / AstraZeneca vaccine hits the market

Boris Johnson gives a thumbs up as he has his temperature checked on a visit to Chase Farm Hospital in north London today while Oxford University / AstraZeneca vaccine hits the market

Boris Johnson confirmed today that a tougher coronavirus lockdown is imminent as there are indications that the whole of England will fall below Tier 4 in a matter of days – and enforcement could be tightened.

The Prime Minister warned the British that despite the optimism sparked by the first Oxford / AstraZeneca vaccine doses, tighter restrictions would be needed for months.

During a visit to Chase Farm Hospital in north London, Mr. Johnson warned of "tough, tough" weeks.

He added, "If you look at the numbers there is no question that we need to take stricter measures and we will announce these in due course."

Earlier, Mr Hancock responded to calls from Labor and academics for a national lockdown by saying all options are on the table. But he suggested that the first step would be to bring even more parts of the country into the toughest restrictions, saying Tier 3 doesn't seem to be able to hold back the more contagious version of the deadly disease.

A school principal in Berkshire has told parents not to send their children to school tomorrow, even though the more infectious variant of Covid is becoming more common – despite Boris Johnson's assurance that schools are "safe".

Gil Denham, headmistress of Slough, said she cannot guarantee that students or staff will not be exposed to the virus when they return on Monday, and parents should only send their children in if they feel the risk is not too high is.

Most pre-schools in England are expected to reopen their doors tomorrow, while secondary schools will reopen later this month with a staggered weekly testing program.

But in a series of embarrassing blows to Gavin Williamson's plans, councils across the country are defying government orders and demanding that their primaries continue to teach remotely as the new Covid mutation wreaks havoc.

The UK recorded an additional 54,990 coronavirus cases in a 24-hour period yesterday – the sixth straight day that daily infections exceeded 50,000.

Cumbria, Brighton, Kent, Birmingham and Wolverhampton have asked the Department of Education for permission to keep the primaries closed tomorrow, and are demanding that learning be taught remotely.

Meanwhile, Brighton and Hove City Councils have ordered the closure of elementary schools in the area, while several schools in Wolverhampton, Derbyshire, Merseyside and Nottinghamshire have also refused to open.

And yesterday afternoon, Essex County Council ordered all schools in the only three government-designated reopening districts to move to online learning only.

Kent County Council Chairman Roger Gough urged Education Secretary Gavin Williamson to keep all elementary schools in the county closed. It is "very difficult to justify" to keep some schools open while others are closed.

Elementary school students in Thanet, Canterbury, Dover, Folkestone and Hythe are expected to return on Monday, while the other Kent counties will study remotely for the first two weeks of the semester.

Yesterday Council Presidents in Cumbria, Brighton, Birmingham and Wolverhampton officially asked for permission to allow schools in their area to remain closed.

While waiting for a response from Secretary of Education Gavin Williamson, Brighton and Hove City Councils have advised all school principals to shut down their schools, excluding vulnerable children and those of key workers, and to move learning online.

In Southampton warnte der Stadtrat, dass einige Schulen "nicht genug Personal haben, um sicher für alle Kinder wieder zu öffnen", während der Slough Borough Council sagte, einige Vorwahlen würden geschlossen bleiben, da das Bildungsministerium "allgemeine Verwirrung" verursacht.

Tony Blair: "Stepping up" vaccines is the only way to save schools

Tony Blair urged the government to have five million vaccinations a week – and said it was hard to see how else schools could stay open.

The former prime minister told Times Radio, "If I were prime minister now, I would tell the Downing Street team, 'You have to give me a plan to get that up to five million (vaccinations) a week. "

“Assuming we have the vaccine and should have it. I mean, AstraZeneca won't be able to get up to two million doses a week this week or next, but the week after, that's just AstraZeneca.

“They could probably do more if they knew the system was able to absorb the amount of vaccines they would produce.

"They should get approval for the Johnson & Johnson vaccine by the end of January. Then they finish their studies, and then we should be able to get them up and running in February."

Mr Blair said a "gradual change" in the vaccination program was the only real prospect of keeping children in schools.

He said: “On the one hand, it is a disaster for school children, especially the poorest school children, if they are not educated.

“But it's also completely understandable that teachers and parents should say, not because they think their children… the risk to children is very, very small, it's the risk to transmission rates, and it's the risk to teachers and parents and therefore for those who they are parents mingle with.

"For all these reasons, it is emphasized again why it is so important to get vaccination going."

Colchester, Tendring and Uttlesford were told to open classrooms on Monday – but the council has now written to Mr Williamson requesting "urgent clarity" on whether they should still do so if infections continue to rise.

Ms. Denham – the headmistress of the Marish Academy Trust, which runs two elementary schools in Slough – wrote a letter to parents saying they can keep their children at home if they think it's safer, Berkshire Live reports.

The letter read: “If, as a parent and grandparent, I feel that the risk of my child or someone else in my family getting Covid-19 is too high if they go to school from Monday, I would take them home to keep.

"It may be that this is the choice some of you are making for your own families."

She stressed that parents who refuse to send in their children will receive online lessons.

She added: "Neither I nor any other school principal in Slough can guarantee that students or staff will not be exposed to the virus at school or on their way to or from school when our experience has already shown us that Covid-19 this can easily be spread across a community. & # 39;

Slough Borough Council later said it would allow individual schools to make the call about whether or not to open.

Norfolk, Greater Manchester and Southampton have also enabled schools to make their own decisions about returning students.

Their defiance came when the Prime Minister told parents it was "safe to send their children back" today, but refused to rule out a full shutdown to control the mutated coronavirus strain – as Keir Starmer requested a new national lockdown within 24 hours.

Now, nearly a third of the country – around 17 million people – live in areas where the government's primary elections have been closed or where councils have announced they will support minds who decide to close their doors. Despite the chaos that unfolded, Mr Johnson said yesterday that he had "no doubt" that the classrooms were safe. He told the BBC's Andrew Marr Show, “Schools are safe. It's very, very important to emphasize that.

“The risk to children and young people is indeed very, very small. The risk to the staff is very low. & # 39;

He added, "I understand people's frustrations, I understand people's fears, but I have no doubt that schools are safe and that education is a priority."

Union leader Sir Keir Starmer said his plans were insufficient and that it was "inevitable" that many would remain closed today.

The unofficial closings came after Britain's largest teachers' union, the National Education Union, convened an online meeting attended by 400,000 teachers and supporters, told to say no to reopenings.

Ofsted's chief inspector Amanda Spielman said school closings should be kept to the "bare minimum" as Education Secretary Gavin Williamson urges teachers and parents to "move heaven and earth," adding that the boys are not "the highest cost." “The pandemic

Ofsted's chief inspector Amanda Spielman said school closings should be kept to the "bare minimum" as Education Secretary Gavin Williamson urges teachers and parents to "move heaven and earth," adding that the boys are not "the highest cost." “The pandemic

Ofsted's chief inspector Amanda Spielman said school closings should be kept to the "bare minimum" as Education Secretary Gavin Williamson urges teachers and parents to "move heaven and earth," adding that the boys are not "the highest cost." “The pandemic

Schottland steht vor einer neuen Sperrung: Nicola Sturgeon wird voraussichtlich HEUTE eine weitere nationale Sperrung ankündigen

Nicola Sturgeon wird voraussichtlich heute strengere Coronavirus-Beschränkungen für Schottland bekannt geben. Damit könnten die Schulen bis Mitte Februar geschlossen werden.

Der SNP-Vorsitzende wird sich heute Morgen mit hochrangigen Ministern treffen, um neue Beschränkungen zu vereinbaren, bevor er heute Nachmittag eine dringende Erklärung an ein zurückgerufenes schottisches Parlament abgibt.

Das gesamte schottische Festland ist bereits in die höchste Stufe der Covid-19-Vorschriften eingestuft, aber Frau Sturgeon wird die Maßnahmen angesichts eines „raschen Anstiegs“ der Infektionen weiter verstärken.

Gestern hat Schottland 2.464 neue Fälle der Krankheit angekündigt, wobei die neuesten Zahlen für Krankenhauseinweisungen und Todesfälle erst am Dienstag fällig werden.

Es wird davon ausgegangen, dass das weitere Vorgehen von Frau Sturgeon tatsächlich zu einer weiteren nationalen Sperrung führen wird, die möglicherweise bis zum Frühjahr andauern wird.

Die geplante Wiedereröffnung der schottischen Schulen am 18. Januar wird voraussichtlich zurückgedrängt. Berichten zufolge könnte ihnen mitgeteilt werden, dass sie bis Mitte nächsten Monats geschlossen bleiben sollen.

Es wird auch angenommen, dass eine härtere Botschaft, zu Hause zu bleiben, sowie eine Verschärfung der Regeln für das Treffen mit anderen Haushalten in Betracht gezogen werden.

Die Ankündigung von Frau Sturgeon wird von Downing Street genau beobachtet und wird wahrscheinlich zu Spekulationen führen, dass England bald gezwungen sein könnte, einen ähnlichen Weg zu gehen.

Kevin Courtney, his joint general secretary, told the selected teachers that they should protest against returning to school – and that it could create a "snowball effect". Within a few hours, the news seemed to have had an effect.

By last night, many schools had made a decision not to open despite being outside the government's "emergency framework" of requiring closings, citing some citing union advice. The Daily Mail has learned that faced with staff shortages, many schools are being forced to make decisions in the 11th class. For example, Lea Community Primary School in Preston said that "due to health and safety, rising rates of transmission and infection … and following advice from unions," the opening was not safe.

St Mary's Catholic Primary School in Birmingham also said "insufficient staff" was the reason for the decision to close the school. Instead, all classes are taught through live lessons offered online.

Bedford Primary School in Bootle, Merseyside, said it was closed to students other than key workers for at least a week "due to lower staffing levels".

Salford Mayor Paul Dennett wrote to Mr Williamson last night saying he wanted face-to-face learning to be revisited. He said he would "support any headmaster in Salford who thinks it is unsafe to open his school".

When Mr Williamson wrote in the Mail on Sunday, he gave no indication that he would consider extending school closings. "The safety of teachers and students will always come first, but we must all move heaven and earth to get children back into the classroom where they can thrive best," he wrote.

Dutzende Eltern kamen an die Perry Court E-ACT-Akademie in Hengrove, Bristol, die für Schüler der dritten und sechsten Klasse sowie für schutzbedürftige Kinder und Schlüsselarbeiter zugänglich war.

Die 37-jährige Anwaltskanzlei Lisa nahm ihren vierjährigen Sohn Brennon auf.

Sie sagte: „In Bezug auf die geöffneten Grundschulen geht es mir absolut gut, weil sie weniger haben.

'Die Sekundarschule ist anders. Aber in Grundschulen wurden Gruppen seit jeher getrennt.

„Ich würde mich ärgern, wenn die Grundschule schließen müsste – ob sie geschlossen werden sollte oder nicht, weiß ich nicht.

„Ich arbeite von zu Hause aus, daher war meine Arbeit hervorragend, wenn ich Kinder zu Hause hatte.

"Es ist einfacher für mich, aber für andere nicht, es ist wirklich schwierig, ich kann mir ihre Kämpfe vorstellen."

A school principal in Berkshire has told parents not to send their children to school tomorrow, despite Boris Johnson's assurances that the schools are "safe" (file picture).

A school principal in Berkshire has told parents not to send their children to school tomorrow, despite Boris Johnson's assurances that the schools are "safe" (file picture).

Die 37-jährige Victoria, die im Finanzbereich arbeitet und von ihrem vierjährigen Sohn Oliver begleitet wird, sagte: „Ich bin sehr zufrieden mit den Kindern, die wieder zur Schule gehen, da stimme ich zu.

„Ich glaube, wenn Lehrer in diesen Situationen zu Hause bleiben – sie sind im Urlaub, werden bezahlt -, werde ich für meinen Job bezahlt.

„Ich werde nicht dafür bezahlt, Lehrer zu sein, und ich habe keine spezielle Ausbildung, um mein Kind zu unterrichten.

„Ich weiß nicht, wie ich mein Kind richtig unterrichten soll.

„Ich gebe mein Bestes, aber in Quarantäne zu sein war ein Albtraum für mich. Ich musste zwischen Mutter sein, meinen Job machen und meinem Kind beibringen – es ist schwer.

„Ich glaube, die beste Lösung wäre, dass Lernen zu Hause nicht nur Hausaufgaben sein sollten, es ist nicht dasselbe.

„Wenn wir zu Hause lernen, sollten Lehrer 100% Online-Unterricht anbieten.

„Dann ist es meine Aufgabe, mein Kind zur richtigen Zeit vor seinen Computer zu stellen und sicherzustellen, dass es dort sitzt und zuhört.

„Der Rest sollte in ihrer Verantwortung liegen, da ich denke, dass die Grundbildung in diesem Land kostenlos ist. Ich zahle meine Steuern, um dieses Recht zu haben.

"Ich sollte keine Mama, keine Lehrerin sein und meinen eigenen Job weitermachen müssen, es sei denn, ich wurde extra bezahlt."

Unemployed Shirelle, 29, mother to 11-year-old Keira, said: 'I have four kids at home and only one can return today.

'She has to go because she's in year six, she's preparing for her SATs.

'But ideally it's not safe enough for them to go home. I think a full shutdown needs to be done.

'This makes me anxious. We have a vulnerable child at home as well, but education is important and for as long as the schools open I have to send them otherwise I'll get fined.

'I would probably home school them until this was all over. It's not very safe, we don't feel safe.'

Unemployed Hollie, 35, mother to five-year-old Zeus, said: 'I've got seven children so Zeus is the only one out of the seven coming back.

'He was kept home from school before Christmas due to having to isolate.

'My personal opinion is that I'd rather have them all home where I know they're going to be safe.

'But then again I know the school takes the measures to keep the children safe and keeps us up to date with any confirmed cases.

'So as much as I would rather have him home with the others I do feel safe knowing that the school is taking the relevant steps and precautions.

'I think they're education is important but obviously so is our health and their safety. I'd rather have all my children home safe with me until this has all passed.'

I run a business – and help my son

Rachel Allen, 40, is a single mother to Lewis, seven (pictured together) and runs a social media counseling from her Tier 4 home in Milton Keynes, Buckinghamshire. She says, "As a self-employed single parent trying to keep a business going that was decimated when the lockdown began, school is a lifeline for me."

Rachel Allen, 40, is a single mother to Lewis, seven (pictured together) and runs a social media counseling from her Tier 4 home in Milton Keynes, Buckinghamshire. She says, "As a self-employed single parent trying to keep a business going that was decimated when the lockdown began, school is a lifeline for me."

Rachel Allen, 40, is a single mom to Lewis, seven, and runs a social media consultancy from her home in Milton Keynes, Buckinghamshire. Your area is in Tier 4, with the latest data showing a new fall rate of 739 per 100,000 for the week ending December 28th.

She says, “As a self-employed single parent trying to keep a business going that was decimated when the lockdown began, school is a lifeline for me. It gives me the space to focus on maintaining an income while Lewis can be in the classroom with friends to get the education he needs.

“I am not entitled to any assistance and I have no savings to fall back on. So I have to keep the business going and make sure that my third year son gets an education.

& # 39; When the first lockdown started … my existing business was almost destroyed overnight. Luckily I was able to hold on, but I must have lost 10,000 pounds this year and to say it was a tough slog would be an understatement – there were times when I felt like my head was in a pressure cooker.

“Even so, we made up our routine: I adjusted my work to gaps to help Lewis with his job and then I got an NHS contract which meant I was a key worker and he was back to school in June could go. But now it's back to home school.

“I am very happy that Lewis' father lives nearby and is very helpful and dedicated. The last time schools closed we took turns taking Lewis and this time we will do the same thing again but both he and his partner also work full time too.

“Fortunately, Lewis is very adaptable and takes everything at his own expense, but I'm worried about how this will affect him in the long run. Obviously, I don't want my son's education to suffer, but I need to prepare for it to likely do so.

"As a single parent and self-employed, we are resilient – I just have to lie down and carry on."

The children want to return to the lessons

Ella Brucher, 35, a self-employed cleaning lady, has two children, Scarlet, six, and Dominic, ten, (pictured together) in Purley, Level 4. Ms. Brucher said: “After she couldn't work at all, it's three months earlier in the year very difficult - and it is also difficult for the children. You want to be back in school. & # 39;

Ella Brucher, 35, a self-employed cleaning lady, has two children, Scarlet, six, and Dominic, ten, (pictured together) in Purley, Level 4. Ms. Brucher said: “After she couldn't work at all, it's three months earlier in the year very difficult – and it is also difficult for the children. You want to be back in school. & # 39;

Ella Brucher, 35, a self-employed cleaning lady, has two children, Scarlet, six, and Dominic, ten, with her husband Nicholas, 40, a manager. They live in Purley near Croydon in south London which is in Tier 4 and has a fall rate of 835.5 per 100,000 people:

“After taking my Christmas break, I expected to be back to work this week. But Wednesday night's announcement changed all of that.

“After we couldn't work at all for three months at the beginning of the year, it's very difficult – and it's also difficult for the children.

“They want to be back in school, they miss socializing – and since they can't meet friends outside of school, the classroom was the only place they had this important interaction.

“My son plays computer games and talks to friends on headphones, he has classes, he is sensible and can work alone, but he lacks the interaction with the teacher that he can only get at school and this is his final year of elementary school.

“It's very hard for my little girl, she missed half of the first year and refused to study at home – and now we're back.

“I think the effects will be felt in the years to come.

“I would have worked five days, but now I have to fit as much as possible into two days so that I can be there to look after the children and support them with their schoolwork.

“I will have to abandon some of my customers. I am only grateful that those who have children and are in the same position will understand.

“My husband was able to continue working from home, but he has to go to work a day or two a week so we just don't have a choice.

"I just hope they can come back in two weeks."

Will the exams be canceled AGAIN this summer?

Boris Johnson refused to rule out exams being canceled this summer after school principals called for the exams to be abolished.

The prime minister has come under pressure to cut GCSEs and high school diplomas because so many children have missed school since the pandemic began.

Secondary schools will have to close for the first two weeks of the semester to suppress Covid – especially the new, faster-spreading variant – and there are fears that the closure could last until February.

School principals have warned of major inequality in the system as some students are less prepared for the summer exams than others. When asked yesterday on BBC1's Andrew Marr Show whether exams should be canceled, the Prime Minister declined to rule out the idea, adding, “We need to be realistic about how quickly this new variant has spread to be realistic As to the impact this is having on our NHS, we must be humble in the face of this virus. & # 39;

There were no exams last summer. The GSCE and A-Level grades were based on teachers' assessments.

Education Minister Gavin Williamson insists the national exams must be done this summer despite Scotland and Wales abandoning them.

The Prime Minister's vow to cut “absurd” bureaucracy that thwarted voluntary vaccinations

The Prime Minister has ordered the removal of 'absurd' red tape putting off former health workers from signing up as vaccination volunteers.

Health chiefs are recruiting an army of volunteers to increase vaccination rates.

But retired doctors and nurses who applied were asked to provide 21 documents, including evidence that they had attended courses on combating racism and terrorism. They also had to prove that they had competence in the areas of fire protection, conflict resolution, human rights and data security.

They branded the system 'ridiculous' and 'impossible', while doctors' leaders demanded a rethink.

Boris Johnson said ministers planned to simplify the process, adding: 'It's absurd. The Health Secretary is taking steps to get rid of that pointless bureaucracy.'

But former Education Secretary Lord Baker told the Sunday Times that teachers should be allowed to grade their students instead.

He said teachers should take into account the number of days missed, adding, "They are better than algorithms and they are the only people who can potentially judge their students' performance during this extraordinary period of time."

More than 2,000 school principals from the WorthLess? Insist that health is not only compromised to protect exam schedules. They added: “Greater public health, the safety of students and staff should come before exams. Public safety should not be jeopardized or driven by an inflexible pursuit of GCSE and high school diplomas. "

One of its directors, Jules White, director of Tanbridge House School in Horsham, West Sussex, told the Sunday Times that there was "great skepticism that exams can be conducted fairly".

The group instead recommended teacher ratings for the final grades, saying it was more unfair for students to take exams in areas more affected by the pandemic.

But Anne Longfield, the England Commissioner for Children, said: "Most of the children I speak to want the exams to continue, but they clearly have to be fair."

A panel of experts will report to the Minister of Education recommending that exams be fair for children across England.

There are concerns about how to address the hidden drawbacks for children whose access to distance learning is poor.

Matt Hood, director of Oak National Academy, which the government hired to create online lessons, said a million children were forced to use their parents' cell phones to study because they did not have a phone or laptop.

The Department of Education said there are no plans to cancel exams.

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