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Hundreds of people line the streets of Jack Charlton's hometown


Hundreds of people today lined the streets of a city in Northumberland to pay their respects to World Cup winner Jack Charlton after the footballer died eleven days ago at the age of 85.

The mourning community left his house and walked slowly through Ashington, where he and his brother Sir Bobby spent countless hours in side streets and parks to hone their skills and get them to the top of the game.

Charlton became a successful manager, particularly in the Republic of Ireland. The legend of Leeds United, known for its uncompromising defense, has been recognized by the whole football world.

The central defender continued to be venerated in Middlesbrough after leading the club as champions in the old premier league. However, he led the Republic of Ireland, which sealed his reputation as one of the greatest.

People watch the funeral procession to remember Jack Charlton in his hometown of Ashington, Northumberland today

People line the streets to pay tribute to Jack Charlton before his funeral procession in Ashington, Northumberland

People line the streets to pay tribute to Jack Charlton before his funeral procession in Ashington, Northumberland

The Wilson family is in Ashington today to honor Jack Charlton's work with the Republic of Ireland national team

The Wilson family is in Ashington today to honor Jack Charlton's work with the Republic of Ireland national team

Young and old line the streets to pay tribute to Jack Charlton before his funeral procession in Ashington this morning

Young and old line the streets to pay tribute to Jack Charlton before his funeral procession in Ashington this morning

A man and a woman in English shirts are standing in the street waiting for Jack Charlton's funeral today

A man and a woman in English shirts are standing in the street waiting for Jack Charlton's funeral today

People stand apart as they line the streets of Ashington this morning to pay tribute to Jack Charlton

People stand apart as they line the streets of Ashington this morning to pay tribute to Jack Charlton

Young people hold a flag that & # 39; Jack the lad & # 39; Pays tribute as they line the streets of Ashington in Northumberland this morning

Young people hold a flag that & # 39; Jack the lad & # 39; Pays tribute as they line the streets of Ashington in Northumberland this morning

Irish fans took Big Jack to heart and the feeling was mutual when he led the country to two successful World Cup campaigns in 1990 and 1994

Peter Mather, a 68-year-old retired bricklayer, was on the way to the funeral with a sign reading "Howay Wor Jack". He said, "I usually never wear a hat, but I have one today out of respect for Jack.

“I lived on the other side of the street from here and I vividly remember the World Cup final. At the final whistle, he dropped to his knees, a tall, hard man like this showed such emotions. I will never forget it. & # 39;

Irishman Patrick Wilson and his family were in Ashington to show respect. The 68-year-old civil engineer, originally from Rahugh, County Westmead and now living in Longframlington, Northumberland, said: “Jack played football in Ireland. We called it soccer.

“We consider him a humble person, a man for people. He was a simple person with no air and grace. In Jack's eyes, everyone was the same. & # 39;

64-year-old Peter Cowans decorated the outside of his home in Ashington with flags in honor of the World Cup winner. The former policeman said: “He was a gracious guy, not just a soccer legend, but also a real gentleman.

Football legend Jack Charlton is pictured at the Gordon Banks funeral in Stoke-on-Trent, Staffordshire, in March 2019

Football legend Jack Charlton is pictured at the Gordon Banks funeral in Stoke-on-Trent, Staffordshire, in March 2019

A man wears a Newcastle United retro shirt from the 1970s while people are waiting in Ashington today to pay tribute to Jack Charlton

A man wears a Newcastle United retro shirt from the 1970s while people are waiting in Ashington today to pay tribute to Jack Charlton

A man is wearing a Newcastle shirt in Ashington today

A boy pays tribute to Jack Charlton before the funeral procession today

A man wears a Newcastle shirt (left) while a boy pays tribute to the funeral procession Jack Charlton (right) today

Peter Cowans, 64, with flags in front of his home in Ashington, in front of Jack Charlton's funeral procession today

Peter Cowans, 64, with flags in front of his home in Ashington, in front of Jack Charlton's funeral procession today

A man covers his face with a scarf while people line the streets of Ashington this morning to pay tribute to Jack Charlton

A man covers his face with a scarf while people line the streets of Ashington this morning to pay tribute to Jack Charlton

Balloons and tributes will be installed this morning by employees of the Woodhorn Park Care Home in Ashington, Northumberland

Balloons and tributes will be installed this morning by employees of the Woodhorn Park Care Home in Ashington, Northumberland

Peter Mather, 68, stands in front of today's funeral procession with a sign saying "Howay Wor Jack" in Ashington

Peter Mather, 68, stands in front of today's funeral procession with a sign saying "Howay Wor Jack" in Ashington

Before Jack Charlton's funeral procession, flags are left in front of the houses in Ashington, Northumberland this morning

Before Jack Charlton's funeral procession, flags are left in front of the houses in Ashington, Northumberland this morning

"I am delighted that the crowd has turned out in droves – I knew they would. He never forgot his roots. & # 39;

51-year-old Leeds United fan Kevin Coe and his six-year-old son Ellis were on their way to the funeral procession. Regarding a 1971 documentary showing Jack Charlton's personal life in Ashington, Mr. Coe said: “He just seems to be a normal guy. He still went to the clubs to take part in Whippet races. It summarizes this area. & # 39;

Mr. Coe from Rothbury, Northumberland, remembered the enthusiastic fisherman who spent time on the Coquet River.

Charlton was the eldest son of miner Bob and his wife Cissie, who had three more boys. He followed his father briefly in the pit before leaving Northumberland to join the Leeds United ground staff at the age of 15.

He stayed there for a remarkable 23 years, a spell that was broken only by the National Service and played an important role in the club, which grew from a fellow campaigner to a great European force.

He was almost 30 years old when he made his debut in England, but the late developer got good at just the right time and was one of the Wembley heroes on that famous day in 1966.

Outside of football, Charlton loved his country activities and was an avid fisherman. He remained a hugely popular personality when he retired, and many fans told how he always had time for supporters when he was traveling in his beloved northeast.

Jack Charlton honors will be exhibited in Ashington ahead of the funeral service that will take place through his hometown today

Jack Charlton honors will be exhibited in Ashington ahead of the funeral service that will take place through his hometown today

A sign in honor of Jack Charlton is displayed on a fence in Ashington, Northumberland, this morning before the funeral

A sign in honor of Jack Charlton is displayed on a fence in Ashington, Northumberland, this morning before the funeral

Jack Charlton honors are issued before the funeral service, which is said to lead through his hometown in childhood

Jack Charlton honors are issued before the funeral service, which is said to lead through his hometown in childhood

The West Chapel in the West Road Crematorium and Cemetery in Newcastle is pictured today where the funeral is taking place

The West Chapel in the West Road Crematorium and Cemetery in Newcastle is pictured today where the funeral is taking place

The West Chapel billboard at West Road Crematorium and Cemetery shows that Jack Charlton's funeral begins at 11:45 a.m.

The West Chapel billboard at West Road Crematorium and Cemetery shows that Jack Charlton's funeral begins at 11:45 a.m.

The children's home of football legends Bobby and Jack Charlton in Ashington, Northumberland, is pictured yesterday

The children's home of football legends Bobby and Jack Charlton in Ashington, Northumberland, is pictured yesterday

The street in Ashington where football legends Bobby and Jack Charlton grew up is pictured yesterday

The street in Ashington where football legends Bobby and Jack Charlton grew up is pictured yesterday

The mourning community will leave Jack Charlton's house and drive slowly through Ashington today on the route shown above

The mourning community will leave Jack Charlton's house and drive slowly through Ashington today on the route shown above

He is survived by Mrs. Pat and her three children John, Deborah and Peter. Charlton was diagnosed with lymphoma last year and also battled dementia.

After his death, his family said in a statement: “Jack died peacefully on Friday, July 10, at the age of 85. He was at home in Northumberland with his family by his side.

He was not only a friend of many, but also a very revered husband, father, grandfather and great-grandfather. We cannot express how proud we are of the extraordinary life he has led and the joy he has given so many people in different countries and from all walks of life.

“He was a thoroughly honest, kind, funny and sincere man who always had time for people. His loss will leave a big hole in our whole life, but we are thankful for a life full of happy memories. & # 39;

A private family church service with a limited number of mourners is held in the West Chapel of the West Road Crematorium in Newcastle due to Covid 19 restrictions.

JEFF POWELL: The dull but beloved Jack Charlton, the colossus in the center of the English World Cup victory in 1966, is sorely missed. He was a giant of people with a heart of gold

BY JEFF POWELL FOR DAILY POST

The morning after seeing his brother Bobby unveil the Bobby Moore statue guarding the gates of the new Wembley Stadium, Jack Charlton returned alone to the spiritual home of English football.

Big Jack got up early in his hotel room in West London, checked his bag with the doorman, and took the tube on his sentimental journey.

A slow, thoughtful walk from the station along a practically deserted Wembley trail ended up taking his typical fabric hat from the friend who had led himself, his younger brother, and the rest of the boys to England's only World Cup fame in the summer of 1966 .

Jack Charlton holds the World Cup in the air when he leads it around Wembley with his teammates Ray Wilson (left), George Cohen (second from left) and Bobby Moore (second from right) after they were 4 on July 30, 1966: 2 had won against West Germany

Jack Charlton holds the World Cup in the air when he leads it around Wembley with his teammates Ray Wilson (left), George Cohen (second from left) and Bobby Moore (second from right) after they were 4 on July 30, 1966: 2 had won against West Germany

He stood there for half an hour or more. Hand pressed against the base. Not only lost in thought, but also in conversation. "I had to talk to Sir Robert," he said. & # 39; I miss him. I think of him most days since his death. & # 39;

Moore had died of colon cancer 14 years earlier, in 1993. Charlton, his partner in the heart of the defense, added: "We didn't see each other often, but whenever we did we just picked up and talked like in the changing rooms, the hotels, the training grounds and the dinners that Reunions and all that. Yes, and all the bloody funerals. & # 39;

It adds an additional dimension of sadness to the loss of Charlton (85) that his funeral service must take place under the Covid 19 public gathering restrictions.

At a funeral, he told me the story of his lonely stay and said, “I missed my talks with Mooro.

“I went back to visit him so we could spend some time alone. We talked about the good old days. Of friends and laughter and good times.

Jack Charlton talks to Bobby Moore while England trains for the 1966 World Cup in Lilleshall, Shropshire

Jack Charlton talks to Bobby Moore while England trains for the 1966 World Cup in Lilleshall, Shropshire

& # 39; About football then and now. About what has gone wrong with England for almost half a century. And I can tell you that he is not impressed by it. Me neither. & # 39;

This is a sentimental story that sheds some light on the dull but loved, open, but disarming, committed, but demanding, honest but caring paradox of a character as legendary for the natural warmth of his company as for his uncompromising football .

Under this tremendous determination to win as a player – tempered in the searing furnace of Don Revies Leeds United and the devouring hunger of the big team for success – a heart of gold beat.

Behind the relentless long-ball power game that his management used to pull the Republic of Ireland out of nowhere to unprecedented success – including a World Cup quarter-final – was a romantic soul whose bear hug buried your face in his chest.

This beguiling invention made this English patriot so darling of the Emerald Island that he gave him honorary citizenship and granted him the freedom of the beautiful city of Dublin. "Is this free Guinness for life?" he asked. Just half a joke.

The statue of former English football captain Bobby Moore stands in front of Wembley on April 27, 2018. The day the statue was unveiled at Wembley, Jack Charlton spoke to her

The statue of former English football captain Bobby Moore stands in front of Wembley on April 27, 2018. The day the statue was unveiled at Wembley, Jack Charlton spoke to her

When I called him at the Irish team hotel in Rome on the morning of Italia & # 39; 90's quarter-final match against Italy to say good luck, he said, "Well, thanks for that, but I know you don't like our way very much . & # 39;

Then, after a pregnant pause, he giggled and added. 'Don't worry, handsome boy. I also know that you are serious. & # 39; So I did. Just like I was sorry when they lost to the host nation. However, this 0-1 defeat did nothing to detract from the awe he has in Ireland. Still tarnish the legacy of his 23 trophy-laden years with Leeds. The least boring is the memory of this sun-drenched afternoon in Wembley.

During his visit to the statue, did he and Moore talk about the biggest day in English sports history, the two-hour 4-2 triumph over West Germany crowned by Geoff Hurst's last hat-trick at the World Cup?

"Of course we have," he said. We remembered the only time I heard him swear. I made a mistake that caused Germany to equalize shortly before the end of regular time. A hard look from him was always bad enough. This time he said to me: "Never do that again."

They were different personalities. After the official victory banquet, Moore hit the West End. Charlton went to the pub to drink alcohol. Still, the bond was strong. For some years it has been tighter than it was between Big Jack and the brilliant younger sibling that he & # 39; Wor Kid & # 39; called, would highlight.

Jack Charlton is coming to Liverpool Echo Arena for BBC Sports Personality of the Year 2008 in December this year

Jack Charlton is coming to Liverpool Echo Arena for BBC Sports Personality of the Year 2008 in December this year

The Charlton boys grew up closer in Ashington, Northumberland than canned sardines, but family relationships became tense after Bobby married. This had no adverse effects on their combined benefits for England. Jack ran to hug Bobby at the end of the World Cup final, "although I was completely exhausted and kept falling on my knees."

While Bobby switched from a superstar at Manchester United to a chivalrous director in Old Trafford, Jack remained rooted in his working class origins in the northeast.

You could often see him walking across the Northumberland or Yorkshire bogs, the cap pulled against the elements, the fishing rod over his shoulder, the shotgun under his arm.

But when it came to public speaking, after dinner and on TV, Jack turned out to be more humorous and entertaining than his reserved brother.

This eloquence helped bring them closer together in 2008 when the BBC asked him to award the sporting personality of the year award.

In his speech, he said the following: “Bobby could play football and was the great creator. I couldn't play soccer, but I could keep others from playing. Together we have proven that there is a place for both in this game. & # 39;

Charlton (left) and Moore (right, pictured in LIlleshall in 1966) were different personalities, but they had a strong bond

Charlton (left) and Moore (right, pictured in LIlleshall in 1966) were different personalities, but they had a strong bond

The English coach Sir Alf Ramsey confirmed this in a team conversation when he brought Jack to his side before the World Cup just a few days before his 30th birthday.

"Alf said he didn't necessarily choose the 11 best players in the country," said Charlton. & # 39; He chose the players who can best do a certain job. I knew who he was talking to. & # 39;

Big Jack's dominance in the air and strength on the ground liberated Captain Cool and Bobby Dazzler to conjure up the world's best magic.

The same service he did for Billy Bremner and Johnny Giles in most of his more than 700 one-club games for Leeds when they were widely used in the 1960s and 1970s.

Now he joins those who have been lost from two outstanding actors in a high level of sporting drama.

While Bobby Charlton (right) became a star at Manchester United, Jack (left) remained rooted in his working class origins in the Northeast. They are shown together in April 1965

While Bobby Charlton (right) became a star at Manchester United, Jack (left) remained rooted in his working class origins in the Northeast. They are shown together in April 1965

Charlton's memory was never the greatest, especially for names. When he first developed dementia, it was hardly noticed.

But there was no overcoming of the lymphoma that had depressed him in the early hours of Saturday and left less than half of the English World Cup heroes still standing.

Moore, Alan Ball, Ray Wilson, Martin Peters and Gordon Banks preceded him. George Cohen, Nobby Stiles, Geoff Hurst, Roger Hunt and Wor Kid remain vivid memories of England's golden moment.

Whenever Big Jack referred to Moore as Sir Robert, he wondered why the skipper was never knighted with Sir Alf, Sir Bobby and Sir Geoff.

The annoying problem of posthumous honors is now raised again in his name.

Two nations - the Republic of Ireland and England - looked up at Jack Charlton (1995 image); an iconic figure

Two nations – the Republic of Ireland and England – looked up at Jack Charlton (1995 image); an iconic figure

Two nations and all of football looked up at Jack, not only because he was 6 feet 5½ inches tall. A giraffe in stature, also a giant of a man.

After speaking to Moore's memorial, which is 20 feet tall overall, he said, "This is the first time he's taller than me, but I felt better for our conversation."

What did Moore say when Charlton said goodbye, took the subway back to town to pick up his luggage, and then boarded the train north?

"What he always said when someone asked how he was doing." Big Jack replied. & # 39; Everything is good. & # 39; What it will be like when you meet again in this heavenly salon.

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