ENTERTAINMENT

Historic "wine windows" that were used in Tuscany during the plague are reused during the coronavirus


Historic "wine windows" used by winemakers in Tuscany to give people their favorite drink during the plague 400 years ago are being used again during the coronavirus

  • Restaurants and cafes in Tuscany are reopening their 17th century wine windows
  • They were originally used during the plague to allow traders to sell their wine
  • Small business owners now sell coffee, ice cream, and wine
  • Around 300 Buchette del Vino are known in Tuscany

Restaurants and bars in Italy have started reopening historic "wine windows" as a creative measure to ensure that customers distance themselves socially.

There are nearly 300 of the small windows found throughout the northern Italian region of Tuscany, 150 of which were found inside the ancient city walls of Florence.

Traditionally, the "wine windows" known as buchette del vino were used in the 1630s when the plague was widespread.

Traditionally, the "wine windows" known as buchette del vino were used in the 1630s when the plague was widespread

Traders could pass their wine on to customers through the windows without coming into contact with them.

Now that another pandemic is forcing people to social distancing, some small businesses in Tuscany have revived their wine windows.

On its website, the Wine Window Association said, “Everyone is home for two months and then the government allows it to reopen gradually.

There are nearly 300 of the small windows found throughout the northern Italian region of Tuscany, 150 of which were found inside the ancient city walls of Florence

There are nearly 300 of the small windows found throughout the northern Italian region of Tuscany, 150 of which were found inside the ancient city walls of Florence

"During this time, some enterprising Florentine wine window owners turned the clock back."

Osteria Delle Brache and Babae in Florence are two of the companies that have put the historic windows back into operation.

Although traditionally only wine was passed through the windows, cafes and restaurants now also serve Aperol spritzes, ice cream and coffee.

Some of the wine windows were destroyed during the 1966 floods, and the association wants to put plaques next to any surviving windows.

The windows allowed merchants to sell wine to customers without coming in contact with them, and now some small businesses in Tuscany have revived their wine windows

The windows allowed merchants to sell wine to customers without coming in contact with them, and now some small businesses in Tuscany have revived their wine windows

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