ENTERTAINMENT

Guy Ritchie is banned from driving for six months after the cyclist catches him driving a text message


The Lycra-clad vigilante cyclist who bought a stationary Guy Ritchie to use his phone is a road safety warrior who is proud to have caught 358 drivers in one year and was responsible for 574 penalty points and fines of £ 35,400 .

Mike van Erp, 48, drives a GoPro through London to catch drivers with their cell phones – often in traffic jams or at red lights – before confronting them on video, noting their license plate number and forwarding it to the police.

Ritchie has become van Erp's ultimate goal and has been banned from driving for six months today after receiving six points on his driver's license for texting behind the wheel, bringing the total to 15.

The West Londoner then publishes videos of his triumphs on his YouTube channel "CyclingMikey" under names like "Give me a finger, get a hard punishment", "A total ridicule" and "A fairly satisfactory piece of justice".

Mr. van Erp, a supervisor and full-time roller skate instructor, has 22,400 subscribers and has described the ease with which he can land illegal drivers with a fine and possible disqualification.

He said to MailOnline: “I am sensitive to him [Richie] and other disqualified drivers. I have to look at myself to judge if I'm doing the right thing.

& # 39; London is probably the world's capital for camera riders. Last year I caught 358 riders and two cyclists. It only takes a few minutes to submit a video.

"You just fill out a form online and send it in. You have to go to court occasionally, I might have had to do it five to ten times."

In the past, he has also complained about rules that prohibit roller skating in some areas of London.

Mike van Erp, 48, caught Guy Richie using his cell phone in stationary traffic in Hyde Park last year

The West Londoner is a serial camera cyclist who bought 358 drivers last year and even received death threats for his shooting. Photos that he posted on Instagram are shown

Mr. van Erp on an Instagram photo

The West Londoner is a serial camera cyclist who bought 358 drivers last year and even received death threats for his shooting. Photos that he posted on Instagram are shown

Phones in cars: what is the law on mobile use?

The law states that you can only use a handheld device behind the steering wheel when the car is safely parked.

This does not apply if you are waiting at traffic lights or in a queue.

The only exception to emergency calls where stopping is not safe

The penalty is six penalty points and a fine of £ 200. If a driver died less than two weeks earlier, he could even lose his driver's license

“I definitely think I will keep the streets safe. The points system is supposed to make people drive better. I've had quite a few anonymous death threats from what I do.

"But I'm just one of many camera cyclists. I think there are thousands of them in London. Some of them are more active than me. & # 39;

He posted 10 videos this month alone, but says only 1 in 5,000 of his interactions make it on YouTube. The day he caught Richie, he filed complaints about three other drivers at the Met.

He explained what motivates MailOnline and said to MailOnline: “My father was killed by a drink driver at the age of 19. I still remember him, so I have a strong sense of road safety. I got my helmet camera for the first time in 2006 and recognized its potential. & # 39;

The vigilante caught Guy Ritchie in Hyde Park when the 51-year-old director of Lock Stock and Two Smoking Barrels typed stationary on his phone. He filmed Ritchie, who was previously married to Madonna, before alerting the police.

The Bromley Magistrates Court suspended Richie on Tuesday for six months after admitting the crime and earned six points on his license. It triggered a ban because he was over 12 years old, because he already had nine previous driving violations.

Mr. van Erp keeps a list of his achievements on his CyclingMikey YouTube account, including the number of penalty points or the amount of fines imposed for each of his goals.

Six days ago, in a video titled "Nice tattoos, still being reported," he approached a driver in a black van who texted in traffic.

After Mr. van Erp stood with his camera next to his window for a few seconds, he was spotted by the confused-looking driver who flipped down his window. "Do you have a good WhatsApp buddy over there?" he asked what the driver replied: "Good, yes".

"Sorry, buddy, you did it while you were driving," said Mr. van Erp, before reading the driver's license plate in the NATO phonetic alphabet. The driver then called him "damn" when he left.

In January, the vigilante approached a white van driver who was watching Instagram videos on his cell phone at the traffic lights. "Instagram videos behind the wheel, huh?" he asked what the driver replied: "It's a red light".

"This is an expensive mistake for you," replied the YouTuber. "We'll see you and pay attention to your contribution." A fixed criminal complaint was later issued to the driver.

Mr. Van Erp's YouTube channel, which had a total of 11,438,443 views, alternates between videos capturing drivers and more mundane footage of his travels through London, including feeding some swans in Hyde Park.

He also posts regularly on Instagram and often poses with his roller skates in various parks across London.

The vigilante has hundreds of videos on his YouTube channel showing how he catches drivers on their cell phones

The vigilante has hundreds of videos on his YouTube channel showing how he catches drivers on their cell phones

Also bought: Mr. van Erp has hundreds of videos on his YouTube channel showing how he catches drivers on their cell phones. Mr. van Erp keeps a list of his achievements on his CyclingMikey YouTube account, including the number of penalty points or the amount of fines imposed for each of his goals.

Mr. van Erp, a supervisor and roller skate instructor, has 22,400 subscribers and calls his exploits "sometimes scary, but almost always funny".

The picture shows one of the drivers he caught on his cell phone

Mr. van Erp, a supervisor and roller skate instructor, has 22,400 subscribers and calls his exploits "sometimes scary, but almost always funny". Pictured are two other drivers he caught on their cell phones

Mr. van Erp met Richie in Hyde Park at around 1 p.m. on November 3 last year. He can be seen here on an Instagram photo

Mr. van Erp met Richie in Hyde Park at around 1 p.m. on November 3 last year. He can be seen here on an Instagram photo

Mr. van Erp met Richie in Hyde Park at around 1 p.m. on November 3 last year.

The footage showed how he approached the director with his black Range Rover and said: "Clear messages open here, oh dear."

Ritchie rolls down his window and says "Hello my friend", to which Mr. van Erp "Shalom" replies.

He added, "I don't think you should do your text messages while driving, I saw you did it back there too."

Traffic begins to move so that it gets out of the way and then catches up with Ritchie, who has now opened his window.

Mr. van Erp then says "I think he doesn't want to talk anymore" before the video ends.

Ritchie was in a traffic queue with Apple headphones at the time, making hands-free calls. He pleaded guilty in writing and was barred from driving by the Bromley magistrates for six months on Tuesday.

Complaint: Mr. van Erp is a qualified roller skate instructor. He posted this picture on his Instagram page saying "Skateboarding and inline skating are prohibited", but added that "it is still perfectly legal to skate on the street while exercising your right to surrender and bypass ".

Complaint: Mr. van Erp is a qualified roller skate instructor. He posted this picture on his Instagram page saying "Skateboarding and inline skating are prohibited", but added that "it is still perfectly legal to skate on the street while exercising your right to surrender and bypass ".

In a subsequent statement, Mr. van Erp said: “I saw this driver on his phone. I stopped and, while waiting for traffic to clear, could clearly see the driver typing on his phone. I then went to the driver's side, where I saw that his iPhone was lit with the classic blue and gray Apple iMessage message bubbles, with text and a message that was being typed but not being sent. & # 39;

The Evening Standard said that the case was handled behind closed doors as part of the unitary justice process to avoid a full trial, with a judge and judge evaluating the papers.

Ritchie, who already had nine points on his driver's license, said he would not contest a driving ban and offered no mitigation for the crime through a letter from his lawyer.

He pleaded guilty to using a portable cell phone / device while driving a motor vehicle on the road, was awarded six points and was fined £ 666 and charged with law enforcement and court fees of £ 166.

Ritchie rolls down his window and says "Hello my friend", to which Mr. van Erp "Shalom" replies.

Ritchie rolls down his window and says "Hello my friend", to which Mr. van Erp "Shalom" replies.

Mr. van Erp said to him: "Clear messages open here, oh dear" before Ritchie rolled down the window

Mr. van Erp said to him: "Clear messages open here, oh dear" before Ritchie rolled down the window