ENTERTAINMENT

Grizzly bear watches over his kill when wolf tries to take a bite in a Wyoming park


Paws from my dinner! The grizzly bear watches over his kill as the daring wolf tries to sneak up on and take a bite

  • The grizzly bear in Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming defended its kill against a wolf
  • The wolf tried to steal the bear's dead moose from under his nose
  • The bear buried the dead moose on the river bank to hide the smell from predators

A lone wolf valiantly tried to steal the kill right under the nose from a bear, despite repeated attempts by the grizzly to scare off its opponent.

The grizzly bear in Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming had just finished eating its delicious meal when an invading gray wolf attempted to steal its kill on September 23.

The bear had buried the dead moose on the river bank to hide the smell of the decaying carcass, but after a few days the wolves began to smell the smell.

And a brave wolf decided to bravely approach the grizzly to try to steal its snack while the bear was taking a nap.

In the video, the daring dog sniffs quietly on the ground next to the place where the bear lies, seemingly unimpressed by its proximity to the giant mammal.

A grizzly bear in Yellowstone National Park in Wyoming defended his hunted elk from a brave wolf who was desperate to claim the snack for himself

The dog quietly sneaks up to the moose and manages to steal a few bites while the bear sleeps.

The bear quickly notices the presence of the invading wolf and jumps to its feet, causing the dog to leap backwards in fear.

But the grizzly surprisingly allows the predator to get very close to its kill before bothering to stand up and scare the dog off.

The head-to-head distance in the video lasts nearly four minutes, with the brave wolf still showing no signs of having withdrawn from the fight.

Gray wolves, which can weigh up to 30 kg, are no match for the massive grizzly bear on their own, but they can pose a threat in a pack.

The bear, which weighs up to 595 pounds, is more powerful than wolves, but the dog is considerably faster than its opponent.

Commenting on the footage, the contributor said, “791 recently knocked down the elk in the Yellowstone River and buried it on the riverbank to hide the smell of the decaying carcass. However, after a few days, the wolves began to notice.

& # 39; This wolf was alone, so it wasn't much of a threat to the massive grizzly. For him it was more of a game to see how close the dominating bear would get him to his kill.

In the tense argument that took place on September 23, the lone wolf approaches the deceased moose while the bear sleeps next to its prey

In the tense argument that took place on September 23, the lone wolf approaches the deceased moose while the bear sleeps next to its prey

The grizzly bear scares off the wolf if it gets too close to its kill, which it had hidden in the dirt to hide the smell from other predators

The grizzly bear scares off the wolf if it gets too close to its kill, which it had hidden in the dirt to hide the smell from other predators

To my surprise, as this picture shows, he made it come very close. The wolf would approach slowly, the bear would make a slight shift in position, and the wolf would retreat for a while. This cycle occurred four times during my observation. & # 39;

Grizzly bears are usually extremely protective of their prey, fighting other bears and mammals that are threatening to steal their hunt.

But bears often encounter wolves as the two predators often hunt the same type of prey.

Gray wolves mostly hunt large ungulates such as deer, mountain goats, and elk.

Omnivorous eating, eating plants, roots and grasses, grizzly bears can also become effective predators and hunt newborn elk, elk and deer.

The bear breed is more adaptable than the carnivorous gray wolf, as it can also survive on fish, berries, small rodents and, if available, even human garbage.

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