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Greta Thunberg doesn't care about jet-setting exploits by celebrities preaching about the planet


Greta Thunberg has said she doesn't care about the jet-setting exploits of celebrities who preach about the environment in an interview before her 18th birthday.

The teenage activist became the face of the youth climate movement after starting a solo school strike in front of the Swedish parliament at the age of just 15.

Since then, Ms. Thunberg, who will turn 18 on Sunday, has spoken at the United Nations Climate Change Summit, has been nominated for a Nobel Peace Prize and named Time Magazine's Person of the Year 2019.

But she said her global superstar won't last forever, so she's trying to "use her position" to do as much as possible "in this limited time".

In an interview with The Times, the 17-year-old was asked how she felt about celebrities traveling the world in gas-guzzling airplanes while they preach about climate change.

She simply replied, "I don't care."

The teenage climate change activist (pictured) became the face of the youth climate movement after starting a solo school strike in front of the Swedish parliament at the age of just 15

Greta Thunberg (pictured) has said she doesn't care about the jet setting exploits of celebrities who preach about the environment in an interview before her 18th birthday

Prince Harry and Meghan Markle have been criticized for using private jets in 2019 – including four trips in just eleven days in August – despite their environmental impact.

Ms. Thunberg said, “I don't tell anyone what to do, but there is a risk in talking about these things and not practicing while you are preaching. Then you will be criticized for it and what you say is won’t be taken seriously.

The teenager with Asperger's Syndrome criticized Boris Johnson's ten-point “green industrial revolution”.

The prime minister launched a £ 12 billion plan for the environment last year that could create 250,000 jobs and cut the country's carbon emissions significantly.

Ambitious proposals include plans to ban new sales of gasoline and diesel cars by 2030, install thousands of offshore wind turbines, and plant 75,000 acres of trees a year.

Ms. Thunberg, who will turn 18 on Sunday, spoke at the United Nations climate change summit, was nominated for a Nobel Peace Prize and named Time Magazine's Person of the Year 2019 (picture)

Ms. Thunberg, who will turn 18 on Sunday, spoke at the United Nations climate change summit, was nominated for a Nobel Peace Prize and named Time Magazine's Person of the Year 2019 (picture)

But Miss Thunberg (pictured) said her global superstar won't last forever, so she is trying to "use her position" to get as much done as possible "in this limited time".

But Miss Thunberg (pictured) said her global superstar won't last forever, so she is trying to "use her position" to get as much done as possible "in this limited time".

Prince Harry and Meghan Markle (pictured) were criticized for using private jets in 2019 - including four trips in just eleven days in August - despite their environmental impact

Prince Harry and Meghan Markle (pictured) were criticized for using private jets in 2019 – including four trips in just eleven days in August – despite their environmental impact

Ms. Thunberg said that while the proposals were seen as better than the government, which was doing nothing, she pointed out that scientists had criticized for not doing enough to combat climate change.

In the interview, the activist also said that she does not think about criticism that world leaders have made of her.

In 2019 Mrs. Thunberg called: "How dare you?" during the UN General Assembly – claim that the heads of state are failing the younger generation.

US President Donald Trump said sarcastically of her UN speech: “She seems like a very happy young girl looking forward to a bright and wonderful future. So nice to see. & # 39;

Last December, President Trump urged Ms. Thunberg to "work on her anger management problem" and "make a good old-fashioned movie with a friend" after she became the youngest person to be awarded the Person of the Year award. by Time Magazine.

After she was named Person of the Year by Time Magazine, President Trump said Thunberg needed to relax and work on her anger management problem.

After she was named Person of the Year by Time Magazine, President Trump said Thunberg needed to relax and work on her anger management problem.

The teen activist mocked the president and used his words to change her Twitter bio

The teen activist mocked the president and used his words to change her Twitter bio

The 17-year-old mimicked a tweet the president sent her last year and urged him to relax and work on his anger management problem.

The 17-year-old mimicked a tweet the president sent her last year and urged him to relax and work on his anger management problem.

In his tweet last year, the president wrote: “So ridiculous. Greta has to work on her anger management problem and then watch a good old fashioned movie with a friend! Chill Greta, chill! & # 39;

In November, Ms. Thunberg threw back the criticism.

The teen went on Twitter to respond to the president's demands to stop the count and wrote, “So ridiculous. Donald has to work on his anger management problem and then go to a good old fashioned movie with a friend! Chill Donald, chill! & # 39;

Last month, the activist said she was celebrating return to school but blaming nations for ignoring climate experts, despite the pandemic showing the importance of following science.

Ms. Thunberg took a year from 2019 to force executives from all over the world to take action against climate change.

The school girl was seen at UN headquarters with an angry look on her face when President Trump walked in last year

The school girl was seen at UN headquarters with an angry look on her face when President Trump walked in last year

As her studies started again, she told writer Margaret Atwood during her guest editing on BBC Radio 4's Today program that the coronavirus crisis had shed light on how we cannot do it without science.

And she accused the world of listening to "one type" of scientists and ignoring others who warn about climate change.

When asked if the pandemic's impact on people's appreciation of science could affect climate information, the teen said, “It could definitely be the case.

“I think this pandemic has shed some light on how … we depend on science and that we can't do it without science.

“But of course we only listen to one type of scientist or some types of scientists, and for example we don't listen to climate researchers, we don't listen to scientists who work on biodiversity.

"Of course that has to change."

She had previously shared a picture of herself on a bike with her school backpack slung over her shoulder as she celebrated her return to training.

However, the environmental activist expressed skepticism when asked about pledges made by nations to reduce their carbon emissions, such as China, which has pledged to hit a net-zero target by 2060.

She said, “It would be very nice if they actually meant something.

“We can't just go on talking about future, hypothetical, vague, distant dates and promises. We have to do things now. And net zero … that is a very large gap, you can fit a lot into the word net. & # 39;

However, she praised the election of Joe Biden as US President, who pledged to rejoin the Paris Agreement on the first day of his presidency.

Ms. Thunberg added: “It could be a good start for something new.

"Let us hope it is and we urge it to be so."

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