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Greater Manchester faces the noon deadline for the third stage decision


Boris Johnson stands ready to announce the third tier lockdown for Greater Manchester tonight after desperate final attempts to beat up a bailout package with Andy Burnham fail.

The prime minister and mayor of the region were talking on the phone after the noon time limit had expired. Mr Burnham acknowledged that if the government puts the pressure on he will have to adjust.

But there was no breakthrough, and community secretary Robert Jenrick confirmed that the discussions are now over.

"I am disappointed that despite realizing the severity of the situation, the mayor was unwilling to take the necessary measures to control the spread of the virus in Greater Manchester and reach an agreement with the government," he said.

Mr Johnson will announce at a news conference at 5:00 p.m. that tier three restrictions, which include closing pubs and restaurants and banning households from mixing indoors, will be in place anyway.

Mr Burnham earlier railed against the government's "provocative" lunchtime deadline that came after a week of bitter money arguing.

However, he admitted that if Mr Johnson enforces the matter, he will have to abide by the law, and said he would give one final number to the government that is offering the area up to £ 100 million.

In a grim warning, he said, "I would predict everyone will end up in Tier 3 at some point during the winter – what we need is a fair financial framework for Tier 3."

Talks are also ongoing with South Yorkshire, Nottinghamshire and West Yorkshire to join the top tier, although announcements are not expected today.

Mr Burnham also touched on "selective" figures highlighted by Downing Street, which suggested that Greater Manchester hospitals could be overwhelmed in a matter of weeks if tougher measures were not taken. He insisted that the occupancy of the intensive care beds at this time of year was approximately normal at 80 percent.

However, new questions have been raised about the need for the drastic move, as official data shows that Nottingham, Newcastle, Sheffield and Manchester are among the cities where cases plateaued after spiking in late September when thousands of college students and college students , staff have started pouring back into universities. Infection rates in all four cities have been falling for several days.

In other coronavirus developments:

  • ONS figures show the number of people dying from Covid-19 in England and Wales rose to 438 for the fifth straight week between October 3rd and 9th;
  • Welsh first minister, Mark Drakeford, has defended the imposition of a "fire safety" lockdown, even though fall rates are below the UK average. The move meant England was the only British nation holding back from action.
  • Ireland's Prime Minister announced a six-week closure of the republic with draconian restrictions on movement, although no new deaths were recorded.
  • Nicola Sturgeon has signaled that restrictions on circuit breakers are likely to last longer when mixing households.
  • A leaked memo from No. 10 advisers has warned the Prime Minister that he cannot always oppose Ms. Sturgeon's referendum demands, and urged ministers to "appease" them with more powers.
  • Sir Patrick Vallance gloomy claimed that even with a vaccine, Covid-19 is unlikely to go away;
  • The UK recorded another 18,804 coronavirus cases, up 34.6 percent last Monday. The death toll is 80, 60 percent higher than a week ago;
  • England's deputy chief medical officer called for the nation's curfew to be brought forward from 10 p.m. to 6 p.m.

The daily number of coronavirus cases, counted by the date the sample was taken, has been decreasing in key cities in recent days

Prime Minister Boris Johnson

The Mayor of Manchester Andy Burnham

Manchester Mayor Andy Burnham (today) called the government's ultimatum "provocative". Boris Johnson (left) assembled his cabinet this morning as the coronavirus crisis continues

Chris Whitty and Patrick Vallance were at the cabinet meeting at the Foreign Office this morning

Chris Whitty and Patrick Vallance were at the cabinet meeting at the Foreign Office this morning

Andy Burnham has blasted Health Secretary Matt Hancock's dubious use of "selective statistics" to spread fear and panic "over the Greater Manchester NHS". Labor MP Lucy Powell also criticized the government's panic tactics, calling attempts to “spin hospital data” as “counterproductive and unhelpful” and causing “a lot of fear”.

Andy Burnham has blasted Health Secretary Matt Hancock's dubious use of "selective statistics" to spread fear and panic "over the Greater Manchester NHS". Labor MP Lucy Powell also criticized the government's panic tactics, calling attempts to “spin hospital data” as “counterproductive and unhelpful” and causing “a lot of fear”.

The UK recorded 18,804 Covid-19 cases and 80 deaths yesterday as infections and deaths rise

The UK recorded 18,804 Covid-19 cases and 80 deaths yesterday as infections and deaths rise

Official data shows that the seven-day rolling average of coronavirus cases in Greater Manchester has declined in recent days

Official data shows that the seven-day rolling average of coronavirus cases in Greater Manchester has declined in recent days

The graph on the left shows how many Covid-19 deaths (blue dots) have been recorded daily in Manchester NHS trusts since the pandemic began. The three dotted lines are projections based on previous models of health bosses and leaked to The Guardian. They show how deaths could have accelerated under different scenarios. The newspaper didn't reveal what the different lines stood for, but it's likely that the steepest would have shown how quickly deaths would have changed in the worst case scenario. The graph on the right shows the same, but for the number of infected patients in the intensive care unit. Red dots indicate the actual number of coronavirus patients who were mechanically ventilated on a given day, while the three dotted lines show projections of how the number might grow under different growth rates

The graph on the left shows how many Covid-19 deaths (blue dots) have been recorded daily in Manchester NHS trusts since the pandemic began. The three dotted lines are projections based on previous models of health bosses and leaked to The Guardian. They show how deaths could have accelerated under different scenarios. The newspaper didn't reveal what the different lines stood for, but it's likely that the steepest would have shown how quickly deaths would have changed in the worst case scenario. The graph on the right shows the same, but for the number of infected patients in the intensive care unit. Red dots indicate the actual number of coronavirus patients who were mechanically ventilated on a given day, while the three dotted lines show projections of how the number might grow under different growth rates

Nicola Sturgeon's two-week breaker is getting longer

Nicola Sturgeon has warned Scots they could face tough new restrictions starting next week as the home visit ban is set to stay in place for "for the foreseeable future".

The First Minister confirmed yesterday that a three-tier system will be announced within a few days.

A ban on cross-border travel is among the curbs being considered, she said.

Following a surge in Covid-19 cases, details of a new “strategic framework” for a three-tier system for Scotland will be released by the end of the week.

Doing so could result in fines for those who try to break the rules.

Miss Sturgeon warned of possible further curbs and refused to speculate what they might look like.

However, she confirmed that the ban on visiting family or friends' homes will remain in place for the "foreseeable future".

The current controls for pubs and restaurants will end on Monday.

This includes the complete closure of pubs and restaurants across the Central Belt, as well as strict restrictions in the rest of the country.

But Miss Sturgeon warned against hoping to return to normal.

The Prime Minister's spokesman announced that Mr Johnson would hold a press conference at 5 p.m. with NHS Medical Director Stephen Powis and Assistant Medical Director Jonathan Van-Tam.

Talks with the Northwest, Northeast, Yorkshire and Humber about further restrictions on the coronavirus continue.

"This is part of the effort we are making to achieve the greatest possible consensus behind the stricter types of local intervention," said the Prime Minister's official spokesman.

Mr Johnson told Cabinet this morning that a level three package with Liverpool City Region and Lancashire had already been "successfully agreed".

He told ministers they wanted to "work constructively with local leaders".

However, he raised concerns that "cases in the region remain extremely high" and that the "most worrying increases" were among those over 60.

& # 39; The Prime Minister said the dire reality is that there are now more COVID-19 patients in Greater Manchester hospitals than in all of the Southwest and Southeast combined and the number of COVID patients will increase from the first The peak in April will exceed in 2 to 3 weeks, "said the spokesman.

In a round of interviews this morning, Mr Burnham criticized the nightly statement by Local Government Secretary Robert Jenrick setting the noon ultimatum.

The mayor, who called for support equal to the 80 percent vacation program for those affected by the lockdown, claimed Greater Manchester leaders "never got a number" of how much money they would receive. And he said they must have carte blanche on how the money will be spent.

“What I will suggest to the Greater Manchester leaders when we meet early this morning is that we write to the government and state what we think is a fair number for that support, given that we have been restricted for three years Months and that has taken a real toll on people and businesses here, ”said Burnham.

"The second thing we would need is full flexibility to support the people who we believe will need support in a Tier 3 lockdown."

Mr Burnham said, “I don't think the government should enforce or dictate that way. We have to work together as a country and I have offered to work with the government all year round.

& # 39; Greater Manchester needs a fair financial framework for Tier Three as there is a chance all parts of England will fall under Tier Three at some point in the winter and if the conditions are not right we will see real damage to people's lives at large Country.

"This is a problem for everyone and it's not just about standing up for Greater Manchester."

Ministers gave Manchester leaders until noon today to reach an agreement on entry of the city into the Tier 3 coronavirus lockdown and said the government would "step in" if local leaders disagree to impose economically damaging restrictions in a timely manner.

Up to 10 million people are living under the toughest of measures this week after talks about whether the region should enter the very high risk Tier 3 again ended in dead end yesterday.

In a statement released last night, Jenrick said he had written to local leaders by noon today to reach an agreement on introducing Tier 3 curbs – and if it doesn't, the Prime Minister will be forced be to intervene.

But Mr Burnham and local MPs have accused the government and Department of Health Secretary Matt Hancock of using dubious "selective statistics" to spread fear and panic about the nature of the NHS run over.

Lucy Powell, Labor MP for Manchester Central, has broken the government's panic tactic, calling its attempts to "spin" hospital data "counterproductive and unhelpful".

But Economy Minister Nadhim Zahawi reiterated the claim this morning.

Mr. Zahawi told BBC Radio 4's Today program: “We have been negotiating in good faith with Andy Burnham and other local leaders in Greater Manchester for 10 days.

& # 39; They will run out of ICU capacity in Greater Manchester by the first week of November if the trajectory continues at current speed.

Grant Shapps

Michael Gove

Transport Secretary Grant Shapps (left) and Michael Gove (right) were among the Cabinet Ministers today

"That is what we should both focus on and put politics aside."

Mr Zahawi said Greater Manchester was offered £ 22 million to encourage contact tracing, making it clear that more was on the table.

"We told Andy and other local executives that we will be putting £ 22m in Greater Manchester, £ 8 a head," he said.

There would also be "additional support in line with what we have done in the Liverpool City region and Lancashire".

Mr Burnham said the government was trying to respond "cheaply" to the pandemic.

"It seems that there has been an abrupt change since summer where it's now the other way around," he said.

“We're trying to respond cheaply to a pandemic, that's what it feels like.

“Then it is especially relevant if you come to a regional lockdown because by definition these will be divisive and if you do not fully fund them you will widen the divisions in society.

"The danger for me of an underfunded regional lockdown is that it is an act of leveling a government that has announced otherwise."

Mr Burnham said he would tell people to obey the law if stricter restrictions were imposed.

But he added, “I worry that if the government chooses to go down this path to impose these local penalties, it will lose the public support it needs to help us all as the country rise to struggle against this pandemic this winter. & # 39;

Mr Burnham's MP has argued that if the government spends £ 14 million a month protecting the most vulnerable, Greater Manchester could be spared the third stage lockdown.

Manchester City Council chairman Sir Richard Leese claimed that there would be less than a fifth the cost of closing businesses under the restrictions, which would allow businesses to stay open and the majority of people to impose stricter restrictions avoid.

Sir Richard said, “Most people who test positive for the virus don't get particularly sick. They are not the problem, 'and indicate that the elderly and those with pre-existing underlying medical conditions, diabetes, obesity, high blood pressure or respiratory problems, are most at risk of hospitalization.

"If this is the evidence, wouldn't it be much better to have an effective protection program for the most vulnerable than a blanket policy to shut down businesses that are dubiously effective?"

The idea was supported by local Tory MPs. James Daly, the Tory MP from Bury North, said he was "extremely sympathetic" with Sir Richard's proposal.

Chris Green, the Tory MP from Bolton West, said, “I think this is a good direction to go. Let's keep our hospitality going through Christmas and support the people at home when they are deemed vulnerable. & # 39;

William Wragg, the Tory MP from Hazel Grove, said: "I think Richard Lee's proposal is justified and should be given due consideration."

Sir Graham Brady, MP for Altrincham and Sale West and chairman of the powerful 1922 Tory Committee, said: “The basic point about Tier 3 is that the proposals appear to have no evidence.

The Mayor of Manchester calls for a "shield plan"

The Mayor of Manchester has called for a "shielding" approach to the coronavirus rather than shutting down the economy.

Sir Richard Leese said that most people who test positive for the virus "don't get particularly sick," but the problem was that too many are getting sick now and the number of hospitalizations and intensive care units is increasing.

He said the government's "blanket business closure policy" was questionable and instead suggested that a protection program for the most vulnerable would work better.

"Most people who test positive for the virus don't get particularly sick," Sir Richard said in a blog post.

& # 39; You are not the problem. Too many are getting sick now and the number of hospital cases is increasing, as is the number of people with Covid in the intensive care unit.

& # 39; That's the problem. & # 39;

He said health professionals now know the greatest risk for hospital admissions: the elderly and those with existing underlying conditions, diabetes, obesity, high blood pressure and other respiratory diseases.

He added: “If this is the evidence, it wouldn't be much better to have an effective protection program for the most vulnerable than having a blanket policy of closing down businesses with questionable effectiveness.

"Unfortunately, the government, which has poorly enforced regulations, does not seem willing to reconsider."

The idea was supported by local Tory MPs. James Daly, the Tory MP from Bury North, said he was "extremely sympathetic" with Sir Richard's proposal.

Chris Green, the Tory MP from Bolton West, said, “I think this is a good direction to go. Let's keep our hospitality going through Christmas and support the people at home when they are deemed vulnerable. & # 39;

William Wragg, the Tory MP from Hazel Grove, said: "I think Richard Lee's proposal is justified and should be given due consideration."

Sir Graham Brady, MP for Altrincham and Sale West and chairman of the powerful 1922 Tory Committee, said: “The basic point about Tier 3 is that the proposals appear to have no evidence.

"There is no reason to believe that closing some pubs and bars would have a significant impact on the spread of the virus."

In his letter, Jenrick said, “There are now more Covid-19 patients in Greater Manchester hospitals than in all of the Southwest and Southeast combined. Unfortunately, despite realizing the severity of the situation, the local leaders have so far been unwilling to take the necessary measures to get this situation under control.

“I wrote to the local leaders tonight to make it clear that I have to tell the Prime Minister that, despite our best efforts, if we cannot reach an agreement by noon tomorrow. It's not too late for local leaders to work with us to take action for the people of Greater Manchester. & # 39;

The letter seen by MailOnline offers the area an additional £ 22 million in financial support, which is only £ 8 per capita for the 2.8 million residents.

Coronavirus infections are on the decline in some of England's largest cities, including Manchester, as official figures show, although Mr Hancock threatens to plunge many of them into Tier 3.

In Nottingham, the rolling weekly case rate peaked at 1,001.2 per 100,000 people in the seven days ending October 8 – the highest in England – but the number has been falling since then and is currently 787.6.

The current rate in Manchester is 432.5 after hitting a high of 583.5 in the seven days to October 3rd, while in Sheffield it was 396.7, after a high of 500.3 in the Week until October 7th. The rate in Newcastle is 371.5 compared to 553.8 in the same interval.

Although infections are emerging in some of the country's major cities, the cities and counties around them are starting to see a surge, which may explain the government's willingness to lock down more areas.

Manchester City is the only area in the Greater Manchester area where daily infections are falling, but the outbreaks in Trafford, Stockport and Oldham have also stabilized. And the rate at which cases are increasing in the other nine counties has started to slow.

For example, through October 12, Bury was reporting an average of 108 cases per day, up from 97 daily cases the week before, an 11 percent increase. This is a marked decrease from the increase between September 28 and October 5, when daily cases rose 33 percent from 73 to 97.

A similar trend has taken place in the other districts. In Wigan, the average number of daily cases over seven days is 205 – a nine percent increase from the previous seven days. For comparison: this number almost doubled from September 28 (99.3) to October 5 (188).

Rochdale & # 39; s currently has 149 cases a day, up 16 percent the week before it was 128. The increase from the week was then much less than the increase between September 28 and October 5, when the daily falls rose 59 percent from 86 to 128 cents.

Sheffield, Leeds and Nottingham are also closely monitored and could be subject to the higher restrictions.

If so, another 13.1 million would be placed under the most restrictive coronavirus rules.

No10 has tried to get Andy Burnham to accept curbs that would bring the Manchester economy to a standstill by warning that the region's ICU beds could be overcrowded by mid-November.

So far, only Merseyside and Lancashire are in Tier 3, requiring closings of pubs and other venues that health officials claim are most contributing to the spread of Covid-19.

Another 5.3 million in Scotland and Northern Ireland are already subject to even more draconian restrictions, while 3.1 million in Wales will be completely suspended from Friday night.

In a joint statement, Mr Burnham and Mr Richard said they were still hoping for a "positive outcome". At the same time, they made it clear that they were determined to work for a financial support package.

They said it was "surprising and disappointing" that an earlier offer of a hardship fund to top up vacation pay and support the self-employed had been "taken off the table" by Health Secretary Matt Hancock.

& # 39; Tonight we wrote to the Prime Minister reaffirming our readiness to continue working towards an agreement but reminding him that Greater Manchester has been in Tier 2 restrictions for almost three months and that this is the people and businesses here has taken a toll, & # 39; They said.

"With this in mind, we do not think it inappropriate to ask for better protection for our worst-paid residents."

The Prime Minister had previously said he wanted to get the "consensus" of local leaders before moving them to Tier 3.

Ministers fear that if they are not supported, public confidence in restrictions will be damaged.

But after more than a week of talking, Whitehall sources said yesterday evening that the Prime Minister felt he had no choice but to take action in Greater Manchester to address the "health emergency" there.

Mr. Jenrick had "final talks" with local leaders yesterday which ended in sharpness.

In a somber statement, a government spokesman described the talks as "disappointing," adding, "This is especially true given the increasing number of cases and hospitalizations in Greater Manchester. We are carefully considering how to proceed."

Covid-19 will likely NEVER go away with a vaccine, warns Patrick Vallance in another dire prediction

According to Sir Patrick Vallance, the coronavirus will likely never go away and a vaccine won't stop it entirely.

Speaking to members of the House of Lords, the chief scientific adviser said he thinks the virus will one day become like the flu and cause outbreaks every year.

He said ministers and experts should stop being too promising and be realistic about a vaccine's prospect and a vaccine's likely schedule.

A shock is unlikely to be completed before spring, said Sir Patrick, reiterating his previous warnings and those of his colleague Professor Chris Whitty that the Covid-19 battle will be lengthy.

At the same meeting, Sir Patrick said he still believes that a pandemic flu is the greatest threat to the UK and that his office has a second system in place in case another crisis breaks out before the coronavirus epidemic ends.

"I think we are unlikely to get a truly sterilizing vaccine – that is, something that will completely stop the infection – and it is likely that the disease will circulate and become endemic," Sir Patrick said at a meeting of the National Security Strategy Committee the Lords this afternoon.

“That's my best guess, and I think a lot of people on SAGE think this is a likely outcome.

“When management gets better, when you get a vaccination that reduces the risk of infection and the severity of the disease, or whatever the profile of the vaccines, it clearly looks more like annual flu than anything else.

"That could be the direction we end up going."

Yesterday's government forecasts suggested Greater Manchester hospitals may be overwhelmed.

"Cases in Greater Manchester continue to grow," said the Prime Minister's official spokesman. "Hospital admissions in Greater Manchester double every nine days."

The Prime Minister's spokesman said that in the "best-case scenario" modeled by government scientists, all available critical care capacities would be used by October 28th and would exceed the peak of the first wave by November 2nd.

The projections suggest that Covid patients will admit the entire current intensive care unit by November 8 and the entire surge capacity by November 12.

However, No. 10 admitted that the numbers do not include Nightingale hospital capacity.

In one round of interviews, Mr Jenrick said, “I think it is very clear that now, after having been discussing this for over a week, this needs to be brought to a close.

“I think everyone in Greater Manchester would agree. So I hope that one way or another we come to a conclusion today or tomorrow. & # 39;

The Liverpool City area received £ 30m for helping local businesses when it entered tier three, along with £ 14m for additional contact tracing capacity and £ 7m for tier two.

Adjusting the overall package for the larger Manchester population would be worth around £ 95 million.

Although Mr Burnham has urged that 80 percent instead of two-thirds of the vacation be paid for by the government, this is being done centrally and separately from the bailouts.

Government projections suggested that Manchester hospitals may be overwhelmed.

Currently, the number of Covid-19 patients in the intensive care unit is around 40 percent of those at the height of the first wave.

Assuming a doubling time of 14 days – the "best case" according to the SPI-M modeling group – all available intensive care capacities would be used by October 28th and would exceed the peak of the first wave by November 2nd.

The projections suggest that Covid patients will admit the entire current intensive care unit by November 8 and the entire surge capacity by November 12.

When asked if this means that hospitals are overwhelmed, the spokesman said, "Yes, that's the full ICU capacity."

Talks about coronavirus restrictions have also taken place with executives from North East, South Yorkshire, West Yorkshire and Nottinghamshire, according to Downing Street.

It comes because Wales and Ireland have been thrown into lockdown in a desperate attempt to suppress Covid-19. Irish Prime Minister Micheal Martin announced plans to impose one of Europe's toughest shutdowns for six weeks from midnight on Wednesday, although there were no new Covid-19 deaths reported yesterday.

Ireland will be put into one of the strictest lockdowns in Europe for six weeks starting Wednesday at midnight, despite no Covid-19 deaths recorded yesterday. Taoiseach Mícheal Martin said the government was introducing level 5 restrictions because "the evidence of a potentially serious situation in the coming weeks was too strong".

Ireland will be put into one of the strictest lockdowns in Europe for six weeks starting Wednesday at midnight, despite no Covid-19 deaths recorded yesterday. Taoiseach Mícheal Martin said the government was introducing level 5 restrictions because "the evidence of a potentially serious situation in the coming weeks was too strong".

Ireland has registered a total of 49,962 cases, with an additional 1,283 infections added in the last 24 hours

The death toll remains low, with just three deaths on Sunday, bringing the total to 1,852 deaths. There were no new deaths

The death toll remains low, with just three deaths on Sunday, bringing the total to 1,852 deaths. There were no new deaths

Counties of Donegal, Cavan, and Monaghan are currently at Level 4, while the rest of the country is at Level 3

Counties of Donegal, Cavan, and Monaghan are currently at Level 4, while the rest of the country is at Level 3

Cabinet ministers have agreed to impose Level 5 restrictions, which will force most businesses to close, prevent mass gatherings and restrict free movement across the republic until December 1.

Matt Hancock reveals millions more people in South Yorkshire, West Yorkshire, Nottinghamshire, the North East and Teesside could be heading for a Tier 3 lockdown with talks scheduled to take place THIS WEEK

Matt Hancock announced this afternoon that millions more people in the north of England will be slammed into top tier 3 suspension this week.

The Health Secretary said talks would take place with local leaders in South Yorkshire, West Yorkshire, Nottinghamshire, the North East and Teesside after agreements were made for Liverpool and Lancashire.

But it came amid an ongoing argument with Greater Manchester. Ministers have issued an ultimatum to the region's Labor Mayor Andy Burnham and mutinous MPs that they must make a deal today – or that they will be forced into the tougher curbs tomorrow.

Housing Secretary Robert Jenrick warned the talks had been "too long" and urged the region to accept a funding package worth up to £ 100 million.

Downing Street tried today to put pressure on the Mancunian rebels by warning that unless the coronavirus outbreak is brought under control, the area's hospitals will be overwhelmed by October 28.

The region could be using all of its ICU capacity by that date, and demand will surpass the previous peak by November 2nd, according to the latest estimates. Even the "surge" fallback is exceeded four days later.

Downing Street highlighted the grim assessment, based on the SPI-M group's "best-case" scenario, whereby cases double every 14 days, while Mayor Andy Burnham and local MPs argue violently over whether a lockdown should be taken the third stage is to be imposed.

Speaking to the House of Commons this afternoon, Mr Hancock said: “Following the successful implementation of measures in Liverpool and Lancashire, talks will continue this afternoon with Greater Manchester under the direction of (the Secretary) and further talks with South Yorkshire, West, planned Yorkshire, Nottinghamshire, the Northeast, and Teesside. & # 39;

As part of the new measures, the public will be encouraged to stay at home, with movement being allowed within a 5 km radius of their home.

Public gatherings other than groups of 10 people for funerals and 25 people for weddings are prohibited, and only important businesses are allowed to remain open.

Construction is allowed, but pPubs, restaurants and cafes can only offer takeaways and deliveries.

The Taoiseach said the government had introduced level 5 restrictions across the country because "the evidence of a potentially dire situation in the coming weeks was now too strong".

Michael Martin said schools and crèches would remain open because "we cannot and will not allow the future of our children and young people to be another victim of this disease". He added, "They need their training."

He also said The government will support efforts to suppress the virus with "increased financial assistance" to individuals and businesses, including improvements to the pandemic unemployment benefit and wage subsidy system. It will also introduce new mental health services.

Mr. Martin added that social isolation and anxiety are very "real problems" and therefore those who live alone or are single parents could mate with another household as part of a "support bubble".

Ireland recorded 1,283 coronavirus cases yesterday, but deaths remain small with only three deaths recorded yesterday. No new deaths were reported.

Of the new cases, 235 were in Dublin, 232 in Cork, 60 in Galway, 47 in Limerick, 47 in Kerry, and the remaining 410 cases were spread across 21 counties. As of 2 p.m. this afternoon, there were 298 people with Covid-19 in hospitals, including 34 people in intensive care units.

Public health officials yesterday recommended moving to level 5 for six weeks. It was the second time in a fortnight that they'd advised the government to act at the highest level.

The government disregarded the previous advice. Instead, they have placed the entire country in Level 3 restrictions. Currently Donegal, Cavan, and Monaghan counties are at Level 4, while the rest of the country is at Level 3.

Political leaders were informed by health officials in Dublin on Saturday of their concerns over the recent rapid spread of the virus. The Cabinet Subcommittee met this morning to discuss the latest advice from Nphet.

The leaders of the ruling parties also met to discuss the final details of the plan ahead of Monday evening's cabinet meeting.

Earlier, Transport Secretary Eamon Ryan had warned that new restrictions would not be imposed immediately by saying, "You don't just flip a switch."

When asked about a timetable for the introduction of new measures, when he arrived for a meeting of the sub-cabinet on Monday, he said, “We will decide.

“I think one of the lessons before that is that you don't just flip a switch, you have to let people know a little bit. But the cabinet has to decide that. & # 39;

The leader of the Greens, Mr Ryan, said he hoped the decisions made would bring clarity to the public.

He said, “I hope there can be something because that's the important part of it. The Tanaiste got it right the other day, you need a number of indicators, but that has to be decided by the Cabinet. & # 39;

The curfew for pubs should be brought forward to 6 p.m., not 10 p.m., says Jonathan Van-Tam

The UK's deputy chief doctor has reportedly called for the bar's curfew to be brought forward at 10 p.m. in order to reduce the rising transmission rates.

Professor Jonathan Van-Tam admitted there was little evidence of the benefits of a 10 p.m. curfew and said he would prefer a 6 p.m. closing time as he spoke about the refusal of the refusal during a virtual meeting with Greater Manchester MPs City said it would comply with Tier 3 restrictions.

When asked if the 10 p.m. curfew will reduce the coronavirus transmission rate, the professor said, “Not really. I would prefer to be 6pm or earlier. & # 39;

However, the government adviser also admitted that, according to The Daily Telegraph, there is no evidence that closing pubs completely as part of a Tier 3 lockdown would control the virus.

His comments come as dozens of night owls brave the winter chill today as they enjoyed a night out in the capital's expanded beer gardens – just a day after London entered Tier 2 lockdown.

Pub goers swapped a night at home to sit outside the numerous bars in central London, Soho, and get around curbs, stopping several households in pubs and restaurants.

He also defended the time it took the government to respond to Nphet's advice to transition to the level five restrictions presented to Health Secretary Stephen Donnelly on Thursday for six weeks.

“I think it does things right. It's complicated, there are a multitude of effects on people's everyday lives.

"I think it is appropriate that we try to get the arrangements and details right during this time."

Sinn Fein leader Mary Lou McDonald said social support needs to be put in place.

She also called for the Pandemic Unemployment Payment (PUP) cuts to be fully restored.

Ms. McDonald told RTE's Morning Ireland that changes to restrictions need to be "balanced" and communicated clearly as people would "really struggle" and "make themselves sick" from new restrictions.

The National Public Health Emergency Team (Nphet) and Chief Medical Officer Tony Holohan called on the government last week to put the Level 5 restrictions in place for a period of six weeks.

Counties of Donegal, Cavan, and Monaghan are at Level 4, while the rest of the country is at Level 3.

It was reported on Sunday that a new lockdown would take four weeks, but it has since emerged that ministers have been asked to provide six weeks of support.

Gaelic games, horse racing and greyhound racing are still allowed behind closed doors according to the rules of level 5.

The non-contact sports training for children and teenagers can be continued outdoors, but only in groups of 15 people. Funerals are limited to 10 people.

Now Welsh First Minister Mark Drakeford said that Everyone in Wales is instructed to stay at home unless they are a critical worker or cannot work from home.

The Labor leader warned that failure to act now would mean "more people will die" as he said that households were forbidden to mix indoors and outdoors while exercise was allowed in the open air, but it has to "start and end at home".

Primary schools will reopen next week after the half-year, but secondary schools will not open until years seven and eight and for students taking exams.

The decision to impose a "short and deep" lockdown by November 9th, reflecting Sir Keir Starmer's national demands and wiping out Halloween and Bonfire Night, sparked angry political backlash after statistics show Wales saw a lower coronavirus infection rate exhibits than England.

The "breaking fire" move has been criticized by Welsh Tories, who said it would doom Wales to an endless cycle of two-week lockdowns, while Conservative MPs in Westminster said it was a "blunt instrument" and "the closure of all of Wales is disproportionate . " the risk in some parts of the country ”.

They also beat up Mr. Drakeford, accusing him of "small man syndrome". One MP told MailOnline: "They have someone who is the head of what is much smaller than the West Midlands but where they have a mayor, Wales." has a first minister.

“He tries to show that he is equal to Boris Johnson. He wants to be seen as equal, but is not. & # 39;

However, the move has put pressure on Mr Johnson, who despite the support of his own SAGE experts, has desperately opposed the option in England.

Lockdown's deadly number has been exposed: 50,000 children see surgery postponed, stroke treatment drops nearly 50%, and one in FIVE people has been hit by depression in just a month when the devastating effects of coronavirus restrictions were revealed

A devastating picture of the lockdown's impact on the country's health and well-being is revealed today in an exclusive analysis that brings together more than 130 studies.

The Daily Mail audit – based on research published by medical journals, leading scientists, and charities – shows the harm caused by the lockdown extends to all areas of health including cancer, heart disease, addiction, child welfare, domestic violence and mental violence illness.

Experts say the analysis suggests that even after the pandemic ends, it will be years for the NHS to catch up – and it will be too late for tens of thousands of patients.

Doctors and politicians have urged the government to ensure that all health services are protected if the spread of Covid-19 continues. The examination of 132 documents shows:

  • Delays in treatment are expected to increase deaths among newly diagnosed cancer patients in England by 20 percent – 6,270 deaths this year;
  • Treatment for stroke fell 45 percent during the lockdown, and there have been more than 2,000 deaths from heart disease.
  • More than 50,000 operations for children have been canceled;
  • Organ transplants fell by two-thirds, with the number of deaths on the transplant waiting list nearly doubling.
  • The total number of waiting lists for routine orthopedic and eye operations is at a record level.
  • Calls to child abuse helplines skyrocketed;
  • As the rates of depression and anxiety doubled, thousands of alcoholics who have recovered have fallen behind.
A second wave of infections in parts of the North West and Wales has further destroyed the services and potentially prevented more people from receiving life-saving medication or treatment

A second wave of infections in parts of the North West and Wales has further destroyed the services and potentially prevented more people from receiving life-saving medication or treatment

At least 25,000 other people died at home during the pandemic in England and Wales because they couldn't or didn't want to go to hospital, a 43.8 percent increase from normal.

And between March 20, when the lockdown began, and September 11, 85,400 people died in private homes rather than hospitals or nursing homes. This was found in a report from the Office of National Statistics, which equates to around 100 additional deaths per day.

Prince William spoke to Liverpool business owners yesterday, days after the city was forced into tier three virus restrictions, expressing fears of a "mental health disaster" if the UK entertainment industry were to go bankrupt due to Covid-19.

Cancer patients will suffer for years

The consequences of banning cancer patients will be felt for years, according to researchers.

If a tumor is discovered early, it can often be treated quickly. But when it spreads, often there is nothing a doctor can do.

Disrupting cancer screening while in lockdown is likely to lead to an increase in cases caught too late.

Cancer Research UK also saw GP appointments dropping, and urgent cancer referrals in England dropped by 350,000 between April and August.

Treatment was also suspended – in April alone, chemotherapy procedures fell 45 to 66 percent.

UCL scientists calculated that within a year 6,270 additional Britons in England will have died of cancer as a result of the pandemic. Hospitals are preparing for a leap in cancer referrals that could compound the effects of a second wave.

Boris Johnson stands ready to move Greater Manchester to the highest level of lockdown restrictions despite opposition from local politicians. Talks about whether the region should enter Stage Three at very high risk again ended in a dead end.

Health Secretary Matt Hancock said yesterday talks with local executives in South Yorkshire, West Yorkshire, Nottinghamshire, Teesside and the North East would continue. This means that by the end of this week another ten million Britons could face the toughest restrictions.

Wales announced they would re-enter what First Minister Mark Drakeford called a "temporary ceasefire". He described it as "a brief, sharp shock to turn the clock back, slow down the virus and buy us more time".

More than 43,700 Brits have died from coronavirus and thousands more would have died had it not been for a lockdown in March. However, with the country facing tighter restrictions, the focus is now on the indirect victims of these measures.

Professor Karol Sikora, cancer specialist and director of Buckingham Medical School, said the results of the mail exam were "a stunning demonstration of the" harmful effects of lockdown on society ".

He added, “If lockdown was a drug you would have to consider the side effects, and yet we are not – although we seem to be diving headlong into another.

"People sometimes say it's a question of health versus economy, but it's not – it's health versus health." Professor Sikora supports last week's Great Barrington Declaration, which has now been signed by more than 10,700 scientists and 29,700 doctors worldwide. He calls on governments to adopt an approach of “targeted protection” that protects the vulnerable while opening up the economy.

Sunetra Gupta, co-author and epidemiologist at Oxford University, said: “These papers and data are starting to provide evidence that the collateral damage has been immense – and extreme measures such as lockdowns are continuing. It is certainly time to consider their full cost measures. & # 39;

Child operations dangerously delayed

A large number of child patients were unable to perform operations during the lockdown, figures show.

A total of 50,000 children had postponed the operation from March to May.

The numbers were released by the Royal College of Pediatrics and Child Health.

A July report warned: "There is an urgent need to restore elective surgical services to children." It was stressed that there is "an enormous surplus of children … waiting for a trial much longer than the recommended 16-week period".

A survey by the British Pediatric Surveillance Unit found that 32 percent of the experts had seen children whose treatment was delayed until the end of April.

In nine cases in which the child died, "late presentation was considered a factor".

Professor Allyson Pollock, a public health expert at Newcastle University, said: “I went through the previous lockdown, but now the question is whether the harm outweighs the benefits, especially for children and adolescents.

& # 39; I am very unsure of the evidence of the benefits of further blanket measures. They haven't been rated and can do real harm. Without very significant investments and increased public service capacity, the damage will never be repaired. Even so, it will take years. & # 39;

The analysis shows that cancer patients are particularly badly affected and the full costs may only become clear after several years.

A study by the British Medical Journal found that endoscopy for colorectal cancer during lockdown averaged just 12 percent of normal, and at one point it had dropped to 5 percent. Delays in colorectal cancer diagnosis are likely to lead to over 650 to 2,250 deaths in England, according to another BMJ article. A Lancet study found that delays in breast, lung and esophageal cancer patients caused by the lockdown are likely to cause an additional 2,000 deaths.

A study by University College London for the British Medical Journal found that chemotherapy admissions fell by as much as 66 percent in April, while urgent cancer cancer referrals fell by as much as 89 percent. It concluded that this would result in 6,270 additional deaths in the first year.

Another BMJ study found there were nearly 2,100 deaths from heart attacks and strokes in England, an 8 percent increase, while the number of people treated for strokes fell 45 percent. The Health Foundation said during the lockdown, accident and emergency visits to England fell by more than half, from more than 80,000 a week to just over 40,000.

Another Lancet paper discovered that the average number of organ transplants performed daily fell from 11.6 to 3.1. The death toll while waiting for a transplant rose from 47 in the same period last year to 87 during the three months of lockdown.

How "staying at home" led to fatal heart attacks

Thousands of Britons died of heart attacks and strokes at home in the first few months of the pandemic.

Experts believe that the government's message to stay home made sick people avoid the hospital even when they needed it badly.

The number of cardiovascular causes rose by 2,085 in England and Wales from March to June, according to an analysis by the University of Leeds. Professor Chris Gale, a cardiologist at the university, said the deaths "shouldn't have happened," adding: "The message to stay home was taken literally.

"The sad irony is that heart attack services remained fully operational during the height of the pandemic."

The British Heart Foundation found that even under 65s, there were 800 more deaths from heart attacks and strokes from March to July.

Waiting lists for electoral processes skyrocketed. The number of orthopedic interventions such as knee and hip prostheses rose by more than a third to around 700,000. More than 600,000 people are now waiting for eye treatments for diseases such as cataracts.

According to the Royal College of Pediatrics and Child Health, 50,000 children in England had canceled planned operations. The effects on mental health and addiction to drugs and alcohol were also severe.

The Office of National Statistics found that depression rates in England have roughly doubled for all ages and genders, from a tenth to a fifth.

Another newspaper in the British Journal of Psychiatry said 18 percent of adults in the UK said they had thoughts of suicide in the first month of lockdown. Another suggested, "There is a high chance that suicide rates will rise."

The Addiction charity found that patients who recover from drug or alcohol addiction are likely to relapse – nearly 40 percent of the total.

The number of calls to the NSPCC emergency number rose from an average of 5,593 per week before the lockdown to 8,287 in May.

Calls to the domestic violence charity in April were also nearly 50 percent higher than the pre-pandemic average.

Leaders have urged the government to protect health services if restrictions are tightened.

Jeremy Hunt, chairman of the Commons Health Committee, told the mail that the mistakes of the first lock cannot be repeated.

"The last lockdown was devastating for cancer patients and we now know that it resulted in thousands of preventable deaths," said the former health minister.

"Regardless of which course of action the ministers now choose, it is simply incomprehensible for the NHS to become a pure Covid service: the urgent treatment must continue at all costs."

Labor MP John Spellar said: “Economic collapse can kill people, delays in diagnosis and treatment can kill people. I don't think Matt Hancock has the right balance. & # 39;

The analysis was started by a senior doctor in a busy NHS hospital who has worked on both Covid and non-Covid wards.

Worried about seeing many patients who were much sicker than expected when they arrived at the hospital, she decided to put together a database to make the studies on the effects of lockdowns easily accessible.

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