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Grandmother died in a one in ten million freak accident when the oxygen tank exploded


A grandmother died in a "one in ten million" freak accident when an oxygen tank she was being treated with for suspected coronavirus exploded "like fireworks with a Roman candle".

Paramedics were administering oxygen treatment to Lynn Hadley at her home in Walsall, West Midlands, when sparks – described as being described by a "giant sparkler" – flew from the device and ignited the chair she was sitting in.

The 67-year-old's husband, Dave, daughter Kelly, granddaughter Mackenzie and the two paramedics had to flee the burning house.

Ms. Hadley, a former Tesco worker, could not be saved despite her husband's efforts.

She died in the chair from fatal burns, an investigation before the Black Country Coroner & # 39; s Court heard today.

Paramedics were administering oxygen treatment to Lynn Hadley at her home in Walsall, West Midlands, when sparks flew from the device and ignited the chair she was sitting in

Ms. Hadley, a former Tesco employee, could not be rescued from the fire on her property in Walsall (pictured) despite her husband's efforts

Ms. Hadley, a former Tesco employee, could not be rescued from the fire on her property in Walsall (pictured) despite her husband's efforts

The investigation sounded like Ambulance crews had been called to the property after Ms. Hadley showed symptoms of Covid-19.

But when the crews started the oxygen treatment, sparks flew from the device – in a way that the investigation has compared to a Roman candle and a "giant box of sparklers going off."

The investigation was told how paramedic Emma Spencer shouted "Oh God" as the flames ignited the chair Mrs. Hadley was sitting in.

Ms. Hadley's family and the two paramedics were forced to flee when flames engulfed the property.

In a statement from senior coroner Zafar Siddique, Mr Hadley shared how he saw a flash of lightning out of the corner of his eye when he switched on the canister.

He said, “We called 999 because Lynn was hot, couldn't stand, and was sluggish.

& # 39; The paramedics have arrived. They wore full PPE. The male paramedic asked Lynn a few questions while the female paramedic took her temperature.

The paramedics decided that oxygen was needed, and the paramedic took an oxygen bottle and placed it on an armchair.

I saw lightning in the corner of my eye. I heard the paramedic shout "Oh God" next to the oxygen tank.

I saw sparks come out of the cylinder and heard the gas start to ignite. The male medic tried to pull Lynn out of the cylinder's way. The room was full of black smoke.

I saw fire across the floor. I managed to grab her arm, but I had to go into the garden because of the smoke.

We went into the conservatory and out to the front of the property. We tried to get back into the house. Police and fire brigade then arrived at the scene. & # 39;

Ms. Hadley's daughter Kelly said, “We called just before 5,999.

“I met the paramedics outside and they put on PPE in the back of the ambulance. I stepped back to distance myself socially and they went into the living room.

The paramedic took an oxygen bottle, removed the cover, and attached the mask to my mother's face.

When the paramedic turned the valve, it sparkled like a Roman candle. They tried to pull the chair away from the cylinder.

& # 39; I heard someone scream, "Oh God". I had to run to move Mackenzie when she was up. & # 39;

Police, fire brigade, two more ambulances and a hazard area response team were sent to the site of the explosion, which completely destroyed the roof and conservatory.

Ms. Spencer, who has worked for the West Midlands Ambulance Service for three years, said: “She (Ms. Hadley) was a pretty sick woman.

I asked my colleague Steve Kelly if he would like to give Ms. Hadley some oxygen.

Ms. Hadley's family and the two paramedics were forced to flee when flames engulfed the property

Ms. Hadley's family and the two paramedics fled when flames engulfed the property

In a statement from senior coroner Zafar Siddique, Mr Hadley shared how he saw he saw a flash of lightning out of the corner of his eye when he turned on the canister. Pictured: Mrs. Hadley's home in Walsall

In a statement from senior coroner Zafar Siddique, Mr Hadley shared how he saw he saw a flash of lightning out of the corner of his eye when he turned on the canister. Pictured: Mrs. Hadley's home in Walsall

We agreed to give oxygen and took out a bottle. It had a cell phone case around the top that indicates it was a new cylinder.

Ms. Spencer said the cylinder's seal was intact and the cylinder was in data and full.

She said, “We found almost instantly that an ignition went off like a giant box of sparklers.

“There were sparks and it got bigger and bigger pretty quickly. It was around the case area, the top area.

I jumped out of the way, my foot caught in the trash bin I had fallen into. Mr Hadley helped me.

When I looked back, there were almighty sparks. I remember leaving the building and pressing my emergency button to call for help.

& # 39; The oxygen mask was still on when I moved. It was seconds, absolute seconds.

I stood in the doorway between the winter garden and the living room. So I looked back and saw that it was sparkling quite a lot.

I found Steve and the patient's husband trying to save Ms. Hadley. It was a failed attempt. & # 39;

She added, “I just saw the spark from the oxygen cylinder and saw Steve and Mr. Hadley try to move the chair that Mrs. Hadley was in. Then I went into the garden.

Hadley came out of the building. The control had reported back by radio that they would send firefighters.

I put a cordon around the house with members of the public because I was afraid it would explode and we were waiting for help.

"I'm so sorry for the family that they had to endure this."

Upon investigation, Fire Investigator Jason Dean said the type of ignition that caused the explosion was "extremely rare" and a "one-off event".

When he gave evidence, he said, "Mrs. Hadley was still sitting in the chair in which she was being treated.

& # 39; The oxygen cylinder hadn't really moved in relation to where it had been.

During the investigation, Fire Investigator Jason Dean told the court today that the type of ignition that caused the explosion was "extremely rare" and "a one-off" occurrence. Pictured: The fire engulfed the Sheffield home

During the investigation, Fire Investigator Jason Dean told the court today that the type of ignition that caused the explosion was "extremely rare" and "a one-off" occurrence. Pictured: The fire engulfed the house in Sheffield

The fire put out the house in Walsall, West Midlands, and the roof collapsed during the fire

The fire put out the house in Walsall, West Midlands, and the roof collapsed during the fire

& # 39; It's an MGS solution cylinder. It is pure oxygen that is used for medical treatment. & # 39;

He said the heat and the sparks came from a regulator in the cylinder – where the oxygen flows through at a speed like speed.

However, he added, “This type of ignition is extremely rare. When I was doing this investigation, I noticed that some cylinders were on and off. There was little or no understanding of adiabatic compression.

“It is a very sad case and a one-time case for someone in my position. In my opinion it was a tragic accident.

“In 28 years of my career, I have never encountered an incident like this. There was a one in ten million chance that this would happen. & # 39;

Paramedic Stephen Kelly also told the investigation how the flames were caught "in seconds" as he struggled to save Mrs. Hadley from the fire.

He described trying to walk back into the property to save the patient, but was hit by a "wall" of heat and smoke.

Mr. Kelly, a technician with West Midlands Ambulance Service for 12 years, said: “I noticed Emma had run past quickly. I could hear that almighty spitting sound. I described it as a sparkler.

In a few seconds it stopped and we tried to move the patient. I heard a spitting noise when she switched on the tube. In a split second, I could see it catch fire.

"My first thought was to move Mrs. Hadley in her chair with her husband, but we couldn't."

The coroner asked him, "Did you try to move the cylinder?"

He replied: & # 39; No. It was a split second. It caught fire very quickly.

We tried to move the chair away from the initial danger. It was useless. I couldn't do it

& # 39; It caught fire. We tried to get out of the property and get Mr. Hadley out too.

“I remember looking at the bottle. It took a split second and it caught fire. There was no smoke, but there were sparks.

I thought it was going to explode. I tried to get her away from the danger. It just couldn't be done

“A split second is all I can say. It was like a wall and I went out of the house. It was a big shock, absolutely terrible.

The investigation, which is expected to take four days, will continue tomorrow.

(tagsToTranslate) Dailymail (t) Nachrichten (t) Coronavirus (t) Tesco