ENTERTAINMENT

Government under fire for "wrong" plans to get Britain back to normal by Christmas


British chief scientist Sir Patrick Vallance warned today that Britain could need another national ban this winter, just a few hours after Boris Johnson announced plans to bring the country back to normal by Christmas.

With signs of a growing divide between the Prime Minister and his top advisors, both Sir Patrick and Chief Medical Officer Professor Chris Whitty said today that UK winter coronavirus challenges will be "much bigger" as the virus's season shifts "benefits".

The prime minister's plans have also been fired upon by scientists who fear that it is too early for number 10 to lift further restrictions as the virus is still circulating and people who are becoming complacent are at risk of a second wave could.

The Prime Minister announced today that he is aiming for a life in the UK to return to normal by Christmas – but warned the country "planning the worst but hoping for the best" when he £ 3bn additional NHS Funds announced and unveiled New Lightning Barrier Powers that allow Councils to pounce on local outbreaks.

In a speech in Downing Street, setting out his schedule for further easing the blockade, he said it was likely that the winter coronavirus would become more virulent – more harmful – and increase the "certain" pressure of the flu season.

But in the same breath, Mr. Johnson unveiled plans to bring the country back to a “normal life” by Christmas and gave the green light for thousands of Britons to return to stadiums this fall to watch football matches and outdoor performances.

The Prime Minister said the government hopes to review any "pending restrictions" in the coming months to allow for a "more significant return to normalcy from November" and "possibly in time for Christmas."

However, scientists and medical scientists fear that the exit from the lockdown is too "premature" and could risk a second wave in winter, since it is known that the virus is still in circulation. Today's data show that 1,700 people are still infected every day in England – a number that has not changed in a week.

Sir Patrick Vallance, the senior scientific advisor to Mr. Johnson, said to members of the House of Lords this afternoon: "If you release measures, it will be inevitable that if you get more contacts, you will see more cases … In winter the challenges are very big and of course there is a risk that this will require national action. "

His counterpart, chief physician Professor Chris Whitty, hinted that the locking rules could return in colder weather, and explained that people may have a group of things that you could do for three seasons, but it could be that in Winter is more difficult & # 39 ;.

According to Professor Lawrence Young, a molecular oncologist at Warwick University, announcing that restrictions will be eased is less likely to make people less careful if they abide by the rules of social distancing. He said, "Obviously the virus is still here."

Professor John Ashton, former regional director of public health in the north west of England, told MailOnline: "This is the wrong time to let things go and announce them with certainty." He accused Mr. Johnson of being "very rash".

However, in a significant weakening of the Prime Minister's tone on the matter, Mr. Johnson stopped ordering workers to return after Sir Patrick Vallance, the government's chief scientific adviser, warned yesterday that there was "absolutely no reason" to the existing policy change people to work from home wherever they can.

The NHS confederation, which represents hospitals, emergency services and general practitioners, warned today that healthcare is heading for a "perfect storm". While the GMB union said the plans to lift the restrictions were "wrong" and too ambitious.

Professor Chris Whitty, chief physician for England

Sir Patrick Vallance, the government's chief scientific advisor, and Professor Chris Whitty, chief medical officer, appeared before the House of Lords Science and Technology Committee today

Prime Minister Boris Johnson said today in a speech that the British government hopes to bring the country back to normal, "possibly in time for Christmas."

Prime Minister Boris Johnson said today in a speech that the British government hopes to bring the country back to normal, "possibly in time for Christmas."

Professor Whitty explained that winter was the right time not to lift the blocking rules and said, “I think there is probably – and this is a very common view among doctors and scientists who have looked at this – a group of things that you could probably do for three seasons, but it may be more difficult in winter because winter benefits the respiratory viruses – that's why we get rivers and colds and coughs in winter.

“So we have to accept that we may be able to do things for a period of time. We may have to do some other things in winter and I think we just have to be honest and the Prime Minister made this very clear this morning. & # 39;

Boris Johnson's schedule to make life in Britain normal again

today: The rules for the use of public transport are relaxed so that everyone can use buses, subways and trains. Public transport no longer has to be treated as a last resort.

tomorrow: New "lightning lock" powers are introduced for councils, allowing them to close public spaces and premises without consulting the government to stop outbreaks.

Next week: New Local Block Plans for Ministers Are Released to Stay Home and Impose Travel Restrictions.

August: New rules for working from home are to be introduced to encourage more workers to return to their offices. Remaining leisure facilities such as bowling alleys, casinos and ice rinks will reopen from August 1st. Socially distant indoor performances in theaters can begin.

October: Depending on the success of a pilot program, the stadiums could be reopened for sports and music events.

November: All "outstanding restrictions" will be reviewed and relaxed at the earliest in November and "possibly in time for Christmas".

Sir Patrick Vallance added: “When you release action, it is inevitable that you will see more cases as you get more contacts. That's what happens…

"And the model that you can see around the world and here is that it is most likely that you will get an increase in local outbreaks – and these outbreaks can be very local – that you respond to and with which you respond quickly a path that is proportionate to what happened. So you have no widespread barriers or measures to deal with it throughout society, although the problem is actually local.

"In the coming winter, the challenges will be much greater, and of course there is a risk that national measures will also be necessary."

Professor Ashton said: "It is too early to say that it will be safe to have football and rugby matches by October." It is too early to say that.

"We still don't know where it is in circulation because they don't have the same tests as in Germany."

& # 39; He (Boris Johnson) is still acting very hastily. I understand the argument about the economy, which now has real problems. But it's not a choice about health or the economy. They are interconnected, if we get a big second wave, the economy will get into terrible trouble. & # 39;

"I think the government should wait until we are certain that we are in control and have no cases in the summer months. So if we take breaks in autumn, we can intervene immediately and crush them. This can be seen in other countries such as Scotland. & # 39;

He added: “In countries that have used this as an opportunity, they are looking for more homework.

“People can be more productive at home and maybe only go to the office part of the week. We see the benefits of reducing traffic and the impact on global warming in a radical change in our way of life.

& # 39; No doubt this will happen in Scandinavian countries. The government is asking us to go back to the old way of working.

"I think the government should wait until we are certain that we are in control and have no cases in the summer months. So if we take breaks in autumn, we can intervene immediately and crush them. This can be seen in other countries such as Scotland. & # 39;

John Phillips, Acting Secretary General of GMB, accused the Prime Minister of & # 39;again shows leadership failure in the face of this pandemic ”.

He added, "With fears of a second surge, confusing advice, and a desperately under-funded health service, the Prime Minister's speech about returning to normal by Christmas only seems wrong."

Niall Dickson, chairman of the NHS confederation, said: “Healthcare has been turned upside down in successful efforts to deal with the first wave – it has barely started to recover from this trauma, and it must do so effectively with one hand behind his back associated with social distancing and PSA that affect every clinical intervention …

Green light for the return of the fans to the stadiums: Boris Johnson announces that sports fields could let the spectators back in from October

Prime Minister Boris Johnson has announced that viewers will be able to return to the UK's sports stadiums in October if successful pilot events take place later this month.

Sports events have taken place without crowds since their restart in recent weeks due to the risk of spreading the coronavirus.

But on Friday morning, Mr. Johnson set the next steps to unlock the block, saying, “From August 1st, we will resume the indoor performance to a live audience, depending on the success of the pilots, and we will also have larger venues like sport, stadiums will pilot with a view to another reopening in autumn.

& # 39; From October we want to bring the audience back to the stadiums. These changes must also be made in a Covid-safe manner, subject to the successful result of the pilots. & # 39;

There is a possibility that only the first month of the 2020-21 football season will be held behind closed doors and fans will be admitted in autumn.

The pilot events, where only a limited number of viewers should be admitted to the rules of social distance in stadiums, could start this month.

It has been reported These pilot events include the County Championship cricket match between Surrey and Middlesex at The Oval on July 26, the Glorious Goodwood race between July 28 and August 1, and the Crucible World Snooker Championship from July 31 .

"Add to that not only the likelihood of Covid reoccurring at a certain level and an additional increase in demand from patients with other infectious diseases, including flu, that will inevitably be associated with winter."

He added: “Taken together, this could be a perfect storm, and even with additional resources, we have to cope with expectations.

"The NHS will prepare, respond, and bow, but it won't work miracles."

According to Professor Lawrence Young, a molecular oncologist at Warwick University, announcing that restrictions will be eased is less likely to make people less careful if they abide by the rules of social distancing.

He said to MailOnline: & # 39; Obviously the virus is still here and we are seeing spikes. The concern will always be that today's announcement could spark further spikes if people aren't careful.

“Relaxing these things still requires social detachment, hand washing, and vigilance. The worry is that people are getting complacent. & # 39;

Professor Young said some workers may feel like they have to go to work to get a wage and hide their symptoms from their boss.

He added: "Boris wants people to work again to boost the economy, but it's an interesting balance. I'm worried that people in manual jobs are forced to work for their salary. And if they do an easy job Coughing or getting a slight temperature, hide it because you think nobody will know, that's the danger.

"The worry is that we will have a second wave this winter. People are infected with flu, colds and corona virus and somehow we have to differentiate between them all.

"I can't think about winter. It will be a real challenge for the NHS. It is all very good to say that we will be back for Christmas, but it will be a great challenge."

Professor Graham Loomes, a behavioral researcher at Warwick Business School, added: "My concern is that while politicians say that their decisions are" guided by the evidence ", we do not receive any evidence and it is difficult to say what they are for Justifications are what is being done? & # 39;

In a press conference on Downing Street this morning, Mr. Johnson said: "It is possible that the virus will become more virulent in the winter months – and it is certain that the NHS will be exposed to the usual annual winter pressures."

He said the government had taken "a number of steps" to prepare the NHS for winter.

The Prime Minister confirmed additional £ 3 billion in funding for the NHS in England, saying that nearly 30,000 ventilators are now available in hospitals, compared to 9,000 before the crisis.

Sir Patrick Vallance and Chris Whitty are missing from PM's latest coronavirus address

Signs of a rift between Boris Johnson and his best academic advisors widened today after being excluded from his address on Downing Street.

Scientific director Sir Patrick Vallance and senior physician Professor Chris Whitty were notable absent from the morning's press conference.

The experts became well-known faces on the number 10 podium during the crisis and regularly flank the Prime Minister for big announcements.

Instead, Mr. Johnson was accompanied by NHS test and trace chief Dido Harding when he asked the workers to return to the offices to save the battered main street.

He also gave the go-ahead for casinos, bowling alleys, and ice rinks to be reopened next month.

Much of the attention, however, has been focused on the breakup of the so-called "three Amigos", which came after Sir Patrick indicated yesterday that the government's rush to open up the economy was frowned upon.

Flu vaccines are being launched on a larger scale than ever before in the UK to reduce pressure on hospitals, and the government has guaranteed billions of personal protective equipment (PPE) for health and care workers.

Mr. Johnson added: “So we make sure we're ready for winter and plan the worst.

"But even if we plan the worst, I firmly believe that we should also hope for the best."

His warning of a catastrophic winter went hand in hand with the news that politicians are pushing to end most social distancing measures by the end of the year.

He said the restrictions on the use of public transport in England will be lifted as of today, as train and bus travel is no longer seen as a last resort.

He said the government will publish new guidelines on work from home in August, hoping that more employees will physically return to their desks to give the economy the much-needed boost.

He made this promise despite Sir Patrick Vallance, the government's primary scientific advisor, and warned yesterday that there was "absolutely no reason" to change the policy.

In the meantime, the prime minister said the government is aiming to re-open stadiums in the fall, with audiences likely to return to football matches and outdoor performances in October.

It is also crucial that the Prime Minister hopes to be able to review any remaining "pending restrictions" in the coming months to enable a "more significant return to normalcy from November" and "possibly in time for Christmas".

Mr. Johnson's optimistic plans come after Professor Chris Whitty, England's chief medical officer, said in April that the country needed to "maintain social distance" for a really long time, at least until the end of the year.

Professor Whitty said on April 22nd: “We have to be very realistic.

"When people hope that it suddenly changes from where we are to where everything is suddenly gone, it's a completely unrealistic expectation."

"We will have to do a lot of things for a very long time. The question is what is the best package and what are we trying to find out."

"If you share more in one area, you have to keep more on board in another area for a reasonable compromise, and ministers must take this into account."

The UK corona virus outbreak is still decreasing by up to 5% per day, as SAGE admits that the R rate in the South West may still be above one and may have sneaked beyond the dreaded number in London

HOW HAS THE RATE CHANGED IN THE UK?

AREA

ENGLAND

United Kingdom

— —.

EAST

LONDON

MIDDLE LAND

NORTHEAST

NORTHWEST

SOUTH EAST

SOUTHWEST

IN THIS WEEK

0.8 – 1.0

0.7-0.9

— —.

0.8 – 1.0

0.8 – 1.1

0.7 – 1.0

0.7-0.9

0.7 – 1.0

0.8 – 1.0

0.7 – 1.1

LAST WEEK

0.8-1.0

0.7-0.9

— —.

0.7-1.0

0.7-1.0

0.7-0.9

0.7-1.0

0.7-1.0

0.8-1.0

0.7-1.1

According to official data released today, the UK corona virus outbreak is still shrinking by up to 5 percent a day. SAGE warns, however, that the R rate in the south west of England and London could be higher than one.

The government's scientific advisory panel found that Britain's current growth rate – as the number of new cases changes from day to day – is between minus five and minus one percent.

It is further confirmation that the crisis is still subsiding and the reopening of pubs, restaurants, hairdressers and beauty salons on July 4th, called "Super Saturday", has not yet triggered a resurgence. However, the numbers show that the UK outbreak is now shrinking somewhat more slowly as the growth rate has risen from minus 5 percent to minus 2 percent per day in the past week.

Scientists said today that they were "cautiously optimistic" about the data, showing that "there is no evidence that the epidemic has gotten out of control as a result of the easing of the ban". But they warned the British "must remain absolutely vigilant" because a delay in the statistics means that it was at least two weeks ago and it could take a week for a spike to become visible.

Separate numbers released today by SAGE show that the reproductive rate of the virus – the average number of people infected by each Covid 19 patient – is still between 0.7 and 0.9 in the UK, which means that it hasn't changed in two months.

But SAGE admitted that the R could reopen in the south west of England, where Britons gathered to enjoy the Cornish, Devon and Dorset coastline, and reopened in London, where pubs with customers were rammed Earlier this month.

HOW HAS THE GROWTH RATE CHANGED?

AREA

ENGLAND

United Kingdom

— —.

EAST

LONDON

MIDDLE LAND

NORTHEAST

NORTHWEST

SOUTH EAST

SOUTHWEST

IN THIS WEEK

-4% to 0%

-5% to -1%

— —.

-5 to + 1%

-3 to + 2%

-5% to -1%

-5% to -1%

-6% to -1%

-4% to 0%

-6% to + 2%

LAST WEEK

-4% to -1%

-5% to -2%

— —.

-4% to + 1%

-5% to + 1%

-6% to -2%

-5% to -1%

-5% to -1%

-4% to 0%

-6% to + 1%

For England as a whole, the R is slightly higher than the rest of the country, with the number of reproductions between 0.8 and 1. Keeping the rate below one is considered key because it means the outbreak is shrinking because not everyone who catches it can get past it.

Other data released today by the National Statistics Office (ONS) say that the outbreak of the coronavirus does not change in England and 1,700 people contract the disease every day. And Britain has announced 17 more coronavirus deaths today as the number of new victims continues to slow.

It comes after Boris Johnson today urged all workers to return to the office in August when he was setting up his UK life schedule to get back to normal by Christmas. In a press conference on Downing Street, he noted that restrictions on the use of public transportation in England will be lifted immediately as train and bus travel is no longer seen as a last resort.

Dr. Daniel Lawson, a statistician at Bristol University, responded to the results and said, “This data allows us to be cautiously optimistic. There is no indication that the epidemic has gotten out of control as a result of the relief.

"However, we need to remain fully vigilant as there is a delay of at least two weeks before an increase in the virus reproductive rate becomes visible in the data."

The growth rate indicates how quickly the number of infections changes from day to day. As the number of infections decreases, you can keep track of the virus.

If it is greater than zero and therefore positive, the disease grows, and if the growth rate is less than zero, the disease shrinks.

However, there are regional differences between the numbers. In the south west of England, the growth rate changed from minus 6 percent to plus 1 percent, to minus 6 percent to plus two. The R number is 0.7-1.1.

In London, the growth rate is between minus 3 percent and plus 2 percent, compared to minus 5 percent and plus 1 percent last week. The capital has an R value of 0.8-1.1.

The Midlands have a growth rate of minus 5 percent to minus 1 percent per day, compared to minus 6 percent to minus 2 percent in the past week. Its R value is 0.7-1.0.

In the North East and Yorkshire, the growth rate remains unchanged at minus 5 percent to minus 1 percent. His R number is 0.7-0.9.

The northwest has a growth rate from minus 6 percent to minus 1 percent, a change from minus 5 percent to minus 1 percent and an R value from 0.7 to 1.0.

The growth rate in the southeast remains unchanged at minus 4 percent to zero with an R value of 0.8-1.0. In the southwest, the growth rate changed from minus 6 percent to plus 1 percent to between minus 6 percent and plus 2 percent.

In the region, the R value creeps over one with a range of 0.7-1.1.

Across England, the growth rate is between minus 4 percent and zero, compared to minus 4 percent to minus 1 percent next week.

The R value across England is 0.8-1.0 and has been the same since last week's jump from 0.8 to 0.9.

An R of 1 means that the corona virus spreads one to one and the outbreak neither grows nor shrinks. Higher and bigger as more people get infected; lower, and the outbreak will shrink and eventually fade.

At the beginning of the British outbreak, it was believed that there were around 4 and tens of thousands of people infected, which means the number of cases got out of control.

According to the government, the R has been between 0.7 and 0.9 since late May, but experts say it will fluctuate more as the number of cases decreases.

The fewer cases there are, the greater the likelihood that one or two "super-spreading" events will seriously affect the estimate of the R rate that was at least three weeks ago.

Sir Patrick Vallance, the government's main scientific advisor, said last month that Britain is nearing the point where the R will no longer be an accurate measure for this reason.

The Scientific Pandemic Influenza Modeling Group (SPI-M) – a subset of SAGE – uses data on the number of Covid 19 deaths and positive tests to find out how quickly outbreaks increase. Monitoring confirmed cases, hospital stays, and deaths is a more accurate way to identify local hotspots.

As the number of people with the virus decreases, the data they measure becomes more volatile and affected by small outliers or unusual events. A large error rate could mean that a "super-spreading" event, if one person infects many others, could increase the R-rate for an area, warn mathematicians.

R rates also fluctuate depending on mobility and are likely to increase as the blockage wears off, as infected patients come into contact with more people on average – especially if they do not show any of the telltale symptoms. However, a temporarily high R rate is not necessarily a concern if the actual number of infections remains low.

Two women walk through Clapham Common in London today without wearing face masks. It comes, as SAGE has warned, that the R rate in the south west of England and London could be over one

Two women walk through Clapham Common in London today without wearing face masks. It comes, as SAGE has warned, that the R rate in the south west of England and London could be over one

Dr.'s analysis Loke shows that deaths in all settings (red bar) in England are still very high, even if deaths in hospitals (blue bar) - which, according to the National Statistics Office, should make up two thirds of the total - have decreased

Dr.'s analysis Loke shows that deaths in all settings (red bar) in England are still very high, even if deaths in hospitals (blue bar) – which, according to the National Statistics Office, should make up two thirds of the total – have decreased

SAGE admitted that the R in the south west of England, where the British gathered for stays to enjoy the Cornish, Devon and Dorset coast (pictured, sun worshipers at Durdle Door), and in London, where, up to 1.1 Pubs have been rammed with customers after they reopened earlier this month.

SAGE admitted that the R in the south west of England, where the British gathered for stays to enjoy the Cornish, Devon and Dorset coast (pictured, sun worshipers at Durdle Door), and in London, where, up to 1.1 Pubs have been rammed with customers after they reopened earlier this month.

Matt Hancock initiates an urgent review of the death count fiasco at Public Health England

Health Minister Matt Hancock has today instructed Public Health England to review the way in which deaths are counted due to a "statistical error", which means that officials "exaggerate" the daily toll.

PHE counts people as victims if for some reason they die after a positive test for Covid-19 – even if they were hit by a bus months after fighting the life-threatening infection, top scientists announced last night.

The method is probably why the daily death toll in England does not decrease quickly because survivors never really recover from the disease, since their death is due to the coronavirus, regardless of its actual cause.

One of the leading experts who had uncovered the bug told MailOnline that his "best guess" was that more than 1,000 people were wrongly registering the death of Covid-19.

Dr. Yoon Loke, a pharmacologist at the University of East Anglia, warned that "this is not a good data collection method" has had a significant impact in the past two months and is because PHE "has chosen a quick and easy technique". .

And the daily death toll could not go to zero "for the coming months" because many older people have defeated Covid-19, but will die for other reasons, added Dr. Loke added. He discovered the mistake alongside Professor Carl Heneghan from Oxford University.

Dr. Loke said: "According to this PHE definition, no one in England can ever recover from his illness with Covid."

Prime Minister Boris Johnson confirmed in a press conference today that the Minister of Health instructed PHE to review the way in which human deaths are counted.

It comes after a number of mistakes at PHE, including stopping testing and tracing back to the peak of the UK outbreak. Tory MP David Davis told MailOnline this month that the organization had "totally messed up" the Covid 19 tests.

For example, if 1,000 people are infected with the virus and all infect an average of 0.8 people or a total of 800 people, the R is 0.8.

However, if 995 of them infect an average of 0.8 people each, but five of them do not recognize that they are sick and infect 10 people each, there are now a total of 846 additional patients. This means the R rate is 0.846 – a slight increase.

However, if there are only 10 people with the virus in an area, nine of whom have an R value of 0.8, one of which is a super spreader and infects 10 others, there are 17 patients out of these 10 and the R rate has risen to 1.72.

As Boris Johnson announced today, he is aiming for UK life to return to normal by Christmas, saying that workers are encouraged to stop working from home in August.

The Prime Minister used a press conference on Downing Street today to set his schedule for further easing of the blocking measures.

He said the restrictions on the use of public transport in England will be lifted as of today, as train and bus travel is no longer seen as a last resort.

He said the government will publish new guidelines on work from home in August, hoping that more employees will physically return to their desks to give the economy the much-needed boost.

He made this promise despite Sir Patrick Vallance, the government's primary scientific advisor, and warned yesterday that there was "absolutely no reason" to change the policy.

In the meantime, the prime minister said the government is aiming to re-open stadiums in the fall, with audiences likely to return to football matches and outdoor performances in October.

It is also crucial that the Prime Minister hopes to be able to review any remaining "pending restrictions" in the coming months to enable a "more significant return to normalcy from November" and "possibly in time for Christmas".

However, Mr. Johnson insisted that any proposed changes would only be made if the spread of the coronavirus continued to decrease and that "we will never hesitate to apply the brakes" if the infections increase.

He stressed that Britain had to be prepared for a second wave in winter when it announced additional £ 3 billion in funding for the NHS and promised new powers to allow ministers and councils to impose severe local closures.

He also promised to increase Britain's daily coronavirus testing capacity to 500,000 a day by the end of October, with the NHS testing and trace program playing a key role in curbing the spread of the disease.

COVID-19 was still the third leading cause of death in June

Covid-19 was still the third leading cause of death in England and Wales in June. Dementia and Alzheimer's took the lead on the most common underlying cause of death, followed by heart disease. The most common causes of death are given per 100,000 inhabitants

Covid-19 was still the third leading cause of death in England and Wales in June. Dementia and Alzheimer's took the lead on the most common underlying cause of death, followed by heart disease. The most common causes of death are given per 100,000 inhabitants

Covid-19 was still the third leading cause of death in England and Wales in June, even though the darkest days of the crisis are over.

One in 14 deaths was caused by the corona virus in June – in the same month, number 10 began to loosen strict blocking measures.

The disease has been recorded on 2,525 death certificates, meaning that 50,335 confirmed or suspected Covid 19 deaths have been registered in the course of the pandemic.

However, coronavirus deaths were significantly lower in June than in May, when the life-threatening infection accounted for one fifth of all deaths.

And it's the first time since March that the coronavirus wasn't the leading cause of death, according to Office of National Statistics (ONS) data released today.

Dementia and Alzheimer's took the lead on the most common underlying cause of death in June, accounting for 10 percent of deaths.

Figures from today's National Statistics Office indicate that the outbreak of the coronavirus does not change in England and that 1,700 people still contract the disease every day.

Estimates based on population tests assume that one in 2,300 people now wear Covid-19 – a total of 24,000 people, or 0.04 percent of the population. This is a slight increase from the 0.03 percent (14,000) estimated last week, but both are within a possible range, indicating that a change is not significant.

However, the number of people infected with the virus daily – 1,700 – has not changed in a week, and the ONS said the outbreak was "flattened".

According to separate estimates of King & # 39; s College London's cases and Public Health England, between 2,100 and 3,300 people are infected daily in England – more than determined by the ONS.

ONS data is considered the most accurate data available. This week's update was based on the results of 112,776 swab tests performed over six weeks, 39 of which were positive.

The data suggest that the removal of the other blackout rules on "Super Saturday" on July 4th does not appear to have caused an increase in coronavirus cases in England – retroactive data will, however, only take this effect into account, which means that the next Weeks will be critical.

Separate antibody testing by the ONS, which tests people's blood for signs of previous infection, suggests that 2.8 million people, or 6.3 percent of people in England, already had Covid-19.

Separate ONS data today showed that Covid-19 was still the third leading cause of death in England and Wales in June, despite the darkest days of the crisis having passed.

One in 14 deaths was caused by the corona virus in June – in the same month, number 10 began to loosen strict blocking measures.

The disease has been recorded on 2,525 death certificates, meaning that 50,335 confirmed or suspected Covid 19 deaths have been registered in the course of the pandemic.

However, coronavirus deaths were significantly lower in June than in May, when the life-threatening infection accounted for one fifth of all deaths.

And it's the first time since March that the coronavirus wasn't the leading cause of death, according to Office of National Statistics (ONS) data released today.

Dementia and Alzheimer's took the lead on the most common underlying cause of death in June, accounting for 10 percent of deaths.

CORONAVIRUS OUTBREAK IN ENGLAND DOES NOT CHANGE, SHOW DATA

The outbreak of the corona virus in England does not change and 1,700 people fall ill every day, according to the Office of National Statistics.

Estimates based on population tests assume that one in 2,300 people now wear Covid-19 – a total of 24,000 people, or 0.04 percent of the population.

This is a slight increase from the 0.03 percent (14,000) estimated last week, but both are within a possible range, indicating that a change is not significant.

However, the number of people infected with the virus daily – 1,700 – has not changed in a week, and the ONS said the outbreak was "flattened".

Separate studies by King & # 39; s College London and Public Health England, which estimate new cases, suggest that the range is between 2,100 and 3,300 – higher than that found by the ONS.

ONS data is considered some of the most accurate available – this week's update was based on the results of 112,776 swab tests conducted over six weeks, 39 of which were positive.

Separate antibody testing by the ONS, which tests people's blood for signs of previous infection, suggests that 2.8 million people, or 6.3 percent of people in England, already had Covid-19.

The ONS said it has changed the way data is counted today and is following trends over a six week period rather than a two week period. As a result, it is not advisable to compare the new estimates with the old ones.

(tagsToTranslate) Dailymail (t) News (t) Coronavirus (t) Boris Johnson (t) Christmas (t) Downing Street