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Government scientific advisors warn of tensions over local barriers that may require a military presence


Serious public unrest in the coming months could "overwhelm" any attempt to control the corona virus and "catastrophically" undermine recovery plans, scientific advisors have warned.

The current “volatile and highly complex situation” means that Britain will face “major challenges” in maintaining public order, according to a paper that was reviewed by the Scientific Advisory Group on Emergency (Sage) in July.

Scientists warn that pandemic tensions are inextricably linked to structural inequalities and international events, and add that the military should be on standby to suppress a possible breakdown of law and order.

The police are unwilling to deal with a large-scale collapse of public order, and the military should be on standby, the Times reported, citing the SAGE document.

The report also discussed the Black Lives Matter movement, which gained momentum in May and early June after George Floyd's death in the United States.

Pictured: The Brixton police tried to end an illegal street party last month. However, 22 officers were injured in the incident, forcing them to withdraw (pictured).

There is an increasing sense of "racial injustice, inequality and discrimination" among black, Asian and ethnic minorities who are disproportionately affected by the virus.

At the same time, the authors say that far-right groups are mobilizing to an extent that has not been seen for a decade and are exploiting fatal stabbing incidents in Reading, London and Glasgow.

Any serious public disturbance that would develop would likely require military support, they say.

Professors Cliff Stott and Mark Harrison's paper states: “While widespread urban disorder is not inevitable, the situation in Britain is currently precariously balanced and the slightest mistake in policing (whether perceived or real, inside or outside the UK) . or politics could unleash a dynamic that makes the management of Covid-19 almost impossible.

"In simple terms, a serious deterioration in public order could hamper attempts to control contagion, hospitals, the criminal justice system and economic recovery."

The authors note that large-scale protests, celebrations and unlicensed music events have increased, while public health news has become less clear.

A serious incident was proclaimed when people gathered on a beach in Bournemouth in June while football resumption led to major gatherings and conflicts.

Sage considered the paper "Public Disorder and Public Health: Contemporary Threats and Risks" two days before the reopening of the pubs in England. The authors warned that this would complicate and introduce the problems.

They also warned that localized locks could be problematic if they were sworn in, which was the case after last minute measures were imposed on Thursday evening in Greater Manchester, parts of East Lancashire and West Yorkshire.

The scapegoat of different communities and the feeling of inequality or complaint about local barriers could also ignite flames.

Any resulting disruption could be the same or greater than the London 2011 riots, with police capacity decreasing in recent years.

A whole district could be banned after thousands of people brought "sheer chaos" to the streets in illegal car rallies and raves on July 19, 2020

A whole district could be banned after thousands of people brought "sheer chaos" to the streets in illegal car rallies and raves on July 19, 2020

This means that officers are transferred from different roles, which affects the ability of police forces to deliver business as usual.

"If a security crisis developed in such a situation, it would undermine public confidence in the government and catastrophically undermine its recovery plans for Covid-19," the paper added.

Wise scientists told ministers weeks ago that oaths would be "problematic" in the fight against coronavirus, as it turned out today

In a report sent to number 10 on July 2, experts advising the government highlighted the Islamic Festival as one of ten events at which the British could reject social distancing.

Minutes from a SAGE meeting a week later, on July 9, showed that scientists were also concerned about spikes in areas in the north of England with large South Asian populations.

Health Minister Matt Hancock denied today that he was celebrating with a last minute move to introduce stringent new blocking restrictions for 4.5 million people in Greater Manchester and parts of Lancashire and Yorkshire.

Mr. Hancock defended yesterday's surprise announcement, which he made in a series of tweets at 9:15 p.m. just three hours before the rules came into force and the oath celebrations began.

In the July 2 report, SAGE wrote that oath "could be potentially problematic when it occurs in the context of a localized lockout or in a situation where a lockout is expected".

At the July 9 meeting, experts said, “Current hotspots are mainly in the Midlands and Northern England and in deprived areas, high-density living conditions and significant BAME communities (particularly in South Asia).

“Communication has to reflect this epidemiological picture. Political leaders in CO (Cabinet Office) and DHSC (Ministry of Health and Social Affairs) must take note of this and act accordingly. & # 39;

Wise scientists told ministers weeks ago that oaths would be "problematic" in the fight against coronavirus, as it turned out today. Pictured: worshipers today observe social distancing in the Bradford Central Mosque on the first day of oath

Wise scientists told ministers weeks ago that oaths would be "problematic" in the fight against coronavirus, as it turned out today. Pictured: worshipers today observe social distancing in the Bradford Central Mosque on the first day of oath

In a report sent to number 10 on July 2, experts advising the government highlighted the Islamic Festival as one of ten events at which the British could reject social distancing. Pictured: Bradford Central Mosque today

In a report sent to number 10 on July 2, experts advising the government highlighted the Islamic Festival as one of ten events at which the British could reject social distancing. Pictured: Bradford Central Mosque today

Residents throughout Greater Manchester, Blackburn with Darwen, Burnley, Hyndburn, Pendle, Rossendale, Bradford, Calderdale and Kirklees are no longer allowed to mix with other households indoors or in a garden to reduce Covid-19 infections.

But people can still visit pubs, restaurants, cafes, shops, and places of worship as long as they are people they live with and avoid interacting with others outside of their bladder. The measures will be reviewed in a week.

Mr. Hancock was asked today if the rules are aimed at preventing families from meeting for Eid al-Adha, an Islamic festival that will take place until Monday evening. There is a large Muslim population in the northwest.

He told the BBC: & # 39; No. My heart goes out to the Muslim communities in these areas because I know the importance of celebrating oaths. & # 39;

The tops in Oldham and Blackburn with Darwen were both driven by rising rates among Asian communities, city councilors said.

Arooj Shah, vice-chair of the Oldham Council, confirmed that cases have increased in Oldham's Pakistani and Bangladeshi communities, which account for up to two-thirds of all cases in the city of Manchester.

Health Minister Matt Hancock denied today that he was celebrating with a last minute move to introduce stringent new blocking restrictions for 4.5 million people in Greater Manchester and parts of Lancashire and Yorkshire

Health Minister Matt Hancock denied today that he was celebrating with a last minute move to introduce stringent new blocking restrictions for 4.5 million people in Greater Manchester and parts of Lancashire and Yorkshire

OTHER SCENARIOS THAT SAGE FEARED MAY BE EVENTS

The July 9 report presented to ministers listed 10 events that could jeopardize social distancing.

SAGE wrote:

1. The escalation of protest programs was interrupted during the blocking (e.g. Extinction Rebellion, Anti-HS2).

2. The beginning of protests planned during the ban (eg anarchist / anti-capitalist groups trying to thwart a "return to normal"; some are scheduled for July).

3. Possible resumption of terrorist activity beyond individual actors, which can make monitoring and volatility of large assemblies difficult.

4. Resume right-wing protests on issues such as child sexual exploitation or "blaming" BAME communities for local blocking measures.

5. Possible attempts to host unofficial Orange Order events (e.g. Belfast, Glasgow), although the marches were officially canceled on July 12th.

6. Eid al Adha (July 31) may be problematic when it occurs in the context of a localized lockout or in a situation where a lockout is expected.

7. Cancellation of the Notting Hill Carnival in London on August Bank Holiday.

8. Rising unemployment and / or fear of employment while on vacation are reduced.

9. Increasing feeling of complaint / inequality due to local locks.

10. Increasing ethnic conflicts (already visible in several cities) due to the imposition of local barriers and the increasing scapegoat of various communities (including East Asians).

All of this requires further consideration and analysis. There is a particular need for ongoing risk assessments of public disruptions and mitigation mechanisms. hate crimes and extremism; and the range of problems that arise from localized blocking.

85 percent of the new Covid-19 infections in Blackburn with Darwen were people with a South Asian heritage, who also make up around a fifth of the population of the community.

Around 20 percent of Oldham's population comes from Bangladesh and Pakistan, compared to the average of 2.8 percent in England and Wales.

People with black, Asian and ethnic minority (BAME) are disproportionately affected by Covid-19.

Scientists can't say exactly why, but they believe it can be a mix of social factors. BAME people are more likely to live in deprived areas, live in large households, and use public transportation where they interact with potential disease carriers.

The July 2 report, presented to ministers by experts from the Scientific Advisory Group on Emergency (SAGE), also highlighted nine other events in which social distancing was likely to be ignored.

These included the cancellation of the Notting Hill Carnival in London on bank holiday in late August as well as protests against blocking and Black Lives Matter.

SAGE recommended that the government promote "strong, clear, and positive messages" about Covid rules, rather than criminal communications.

It also advised ministers to recognize and address racial and ethical inequalities in order to build trust and alleviate tensions in the community.

Thousands of British people marched through the streets of Britain in June and July as part of a series of protests against Black Lives Matter following the murder of George Floyd by a US police officer.

SAGE admitted to being concerned that months of closure, fear of job loss and race-related tensions and police brutality were threatening to undermine Covid-19's prevention efforts.

In the report, experts wrote: “The threats Britain is currently facing are diverse, interconnected and dynamic.

“Public health is particularly affected by spontaneous public gatherings, especially when violent confrontations develop from it.

“Local barriers pose a number of threats to social cohesion and public order. If no upstream measures are taken, the conditions for serious public disturbances at multiple locations are likely to worsen.

“If a serious disorder develops, it will adversely affect public health, facilitate the spread of disease, make it virtually impossible to reintroduce COVID-19 spread measures and are likely to require military assistance. & # 39;

At the meeting on July 9, SAGE asked ministers to focus their communication on people in disadvantaged areas and people from the BAME heritage.

This month it was announced that the NHS test and trace system was still struggling to reach thousands of people in areas of England with the highest Covid rates.

Experts said MailOnline language barriers are one of the main factors behind the low success rates.

Professor Paul Hunter, epidemiologist at the University of East Anglia, said, "People may not necessarily understand what tracers are asking or why it is important to share contact information because of these language barriers."

Gabriel Scally, professor of public health at the University of Bristol and a member of & # 39; Independent SAGE & # 39; said that this breakdown in communication has led to a breakdown in trust.

He told MailOnline: “In many of these cities, people from BAME groups make up a large proportion of the population. For many, English is not their mother tongue. This leads to communication and trust problems.

“The government should delegate local contact tracking powers to people who better understand their communities and the cultures in them. At the regional level, it is easier to involve the communities in the entire process of finding and isolating cases. & # 39;

There was trouble today because the new restrictions in parts of the north of England were announced just 165 minutes before the closure.

Union leader Keir Starmer criticized the move as "a new low for government communications during this crisis," while shadow secretary-general Lucy Powell, MEP from Manchester Central, described it as "a disaster."

"Since there is no one who can answer some of the basic questions, I don't think this is the right way to build trust, take people with you, and maximize compliance with those steps," she added.

"People don't take the corona virus seriously enough": The leader of the Bradford mosque says, "a large part" of his community broke the social distance at the last minute on the eve of Eid with Muslim rage

A locked mosque leader in Yorkshire has criticized some of his worshipers for failing to do so Take the "serious enough" coronavirus threat and lack of social distancing that has led to a "dangerous" surge in cases in the north of England.

Mohammed Ashrif Tahir Nushai, 84, a parish leader in Bradford, spoke out when the government was sworn in at the start of oath over the introduction of a new lock in Manchester, east Lancashire and West Yorkshire.

Mr. Nushai told MailOnline: “Unfortunately there are people in our community who don't take the corona virus seriously enough. Since the main lock was loosened, many people have visited relatives and friends and participated in events in each other's homes without thinking about protecting themselves.

"We tried to get them to understand the message and take greater precautions, but what can we do? Now we are in Bradford in a very dangerous situation with more and more cases of coronaviruses. & # 39;

Akhtar Mahmood, a member of the mosque committee, added: “One of the big problems we had is that people in the homes of the recently deceased are showing respect. We lost a member of our church two weeks ago, and 50 people gathered in his home to express their sympathy. & # 39; A single street in Bradford registered an amazing 17 coronavirus cases in six days.

The areas subject to the new rules prohibiting indoor members from meeting other households are Greater Manchester (City of Manchester, Trafford, Stockport, Oldham, Bury, Wigan, Bolton, Tameside, Rochdale and Salford), Blackburn with Darwen, Burnley, Hyndburn, Pendle, Rossendale, Bradford, Calderdale and Kirklees.

However, other Muslims are furious with the government's decision to announce the new measures yesterday at 9:16 p.m. on the eve of Eid, and have described the decision as an appalling abuse of power. They also accused Boris Johnson's government of "having no regard for British Muslims".

Others have claimed that British Muslims are wrongly accused. 39-year-old taxi driver Mahaz Raja said: “After Liverpool won the Premier League and Leeds United rose to the Premier League, thousands of people were on the road.

“None of them maintained social distance and broke every conceivable coronavirus rule. Why did the government introduce new blocking restrictions on the eve of Eid? As a community, we feel that we are wrongly targeted and that this is a double standard of the government. It makes people angry. & # 39;

Crowds were also featured as they ignored social distance in pubs in Manchester today, although the government decided that residents should not meet members of other households.

Community leaders today described the decision to block the north-west of England at the beginning of the oath as "horrific abuse of power" and accused Boris Johnson's government of "ignoring British Muslims".

Mohammed Shafiq of the Ramadhan Foundation said the decision to ban 4.5 million people for at least a week would ruin the plans for thousands of people celebrating the religious festival in Manchester, East Lancashire and West Yorkshire by Monday evening.

Akhtar Mahmood (left) Mohammed Ashraf Tahir Nushahi (right) spoke out when the government was blown up at the start of an oath because of the imposition of a new lock in West Yorkshire

Akhtar Mahmood (left) Mohammed Ashraf Tahir Nushahi (right) of Bradford spoke out when the government was oathed at the start of an oath over the imposition of a new ban in Manchester, East Lancashire and West Yorkshire

Mohammed Waqas in front of a mosque in Bradford

Precautions at the Toller Lane Mosque in Bradford

Arrangements have been made at the Toller Lane mosque in Bradford, where those responsible emphasize the severity of the restrictions

Despite the recent restrictions announced in the area last night, people were still sitting outside in the Manchester pub garden this afternoon. The measures do not limit visits to the pub, but say that residents should not meet members of other households

Despite the recent restrictions announced in the area last night, people were still sitting outside in the Manchester pub garden this afternoon. The measures do not limit visits to the pub, but say that residents should not meet members of other households

Many Muslims have struck back and say that their communities have been wrongly accused of breaking social distance while crowds gather in bars and beaches. A lot of drinkers are pictured in a pub in London. 39-year-old taxi driver Mahaz Raja said: “After Liverpool won the Premier League and Leeds United rose to the Premier League, thousands of people were on the road.

Many Muslims have struck back and say that their communities have been wrongly accused of breaking social distance while crowds gather in bars and beaches. A lot of drinkers are pictured in a pub in London. 39-year-old taxi driver Mahaz Raja said: “After Liverpool won the Premier League and Leeds United rose to the Premier League, thousands of people were on the road.

Worshipers observe social distancing in the Bradford Central Mosque on the first day of oath

Worshipers observe social distancing in the Bradford Central Mosque on the first day of oath

People wearing face masks have their temperatures checked before being allowed to go to the Manchester Central Mosque this morning to worship because the city and much of the northwest have been closed

People wearing face masks have their temperatures checked before being allowed to go to the Manchester Central Mosque this morning to worship because the city and much of the northwest have been closed

NEW LOCKDOWN: WHAT YOU CAN AND CAN'T

Affected areas: Greater Manchester (City of Manchester, Trafford, Stockport, Oldham, Bury, Wigan, Bolton, Tameside, Rochdale and Salford), Blackburn with Darwen, Burnley, Hyndburn, Pendle, Rossendale, Bradford, Calderdale and Kirklees.

You must not: Meet people you don't live in in a home or garden with, unless you've formed a support bubble (or other legal exception). Visit someone else's house or garden, even if they live outside of the affected area. Meet people with whom you don't live in other public interiors – such as pubs, restaurants, cafes, shops, places of worship, community centers, leisure and entertainment venues, or visitor attractions.

You may: Visiting pubs, restaurants, cafes, shops, places of worship, community centers, leisure and entertainment venues, or visitor attractions with people you live with (or who are in a support bubble), but avoid interacting with others.

Punish: Fines that start at £ 100 and halve to £ 50 in the first 14 days when paid, but double for later violations.

Source: Gov.uk website

Health Minister Matt Hancock had to deny that he was targeting oath when he announced the Covid 19 restrictions when the religious holiday was about to begin – but British Muslims criticized his announcement as "shockingly short-term".

Mr. Shafiq said, “When the government announced that families had already traveled to their relatives' homes on Twitter, people had already started preparing for their oath. Making this decision on social media regardless of British Muslims is a terrible abuse of their power and shows how far they are from society. I condemn the announcement and hope you learned a great lesson from it. "

The Secretary General of the Muslim Council of Britain, Harun Khan, condemned the government for making the announcement "shockingly short-term." He said, "Since the first day of Eid is today, it is as if Muslims in the affected areas are being told that they cannot visit family and friends on Christmas Eve for Christmas."

Labor Bolton MP Yasmin Qureshi said today: "It is irresponsible for the government to make a major public health announcement in a hurry on the eve of Eid Al Adha (on Twitter) without clarity or guidance."

But today a tory with a constituency on the fringes of the exclusion zone accused "BAME communities of not taking this seriously enough" as coronavirus cases have increased in cities with large Muslim and minority groups such as Blackburn, Rochdale and Bradford.

Criag Whittaker, Calder Valley MP in West Yorkshire, told LBC: “When you look at the areas where we've seen rises and falls, the vast majority – but by no means all areas – is the BAME Communities.

“We have areas with high occupancy rates – when several families live in one household. It doesn't have to be specific to the Asian community, but that's the biggest part. Look at the areas. You have Bradford, Calderdale, Kirklees. Bradford and Kirklees have two of the largest populations in West Yorkshire. When asked if he was referring to the immigrant population, he said, "Immigrants and Asian people."

When asked whether he agreed with a Tory MP's comments in one of the affected areas, which alleged that the BAME community was not taking the situation seriously enough, Boris Johnson said at today's press conference: "On your first point, like that … sure are churches that respond enough to the guidelines – well, I think it is up to all of us in the government to ensure that the message is heard loud and clear by everyone across the country and to ensure that all adhere to the guidelines. & # 39;

The Prime Minister said, "I want to thank all of the community leaders, I want to thank everyone, the mosques, the imams, who have worked hard with us to convey messages.

Huge crowds were seen across the country today - the fourth hottest day ever recorded in Britain. Bournemouth beach is pictured

Huge crowds were seen across the country today – the fourth hottest day ever recorded in Britain. Bournemouth beach is pictured

Seven days that resulted in the closure of 4.5 million people

The reintroduction of blocking measures against 4.5 million people in the north of England is the culmination of a week of warnings from the government's leading health experts about the risk of increasing infection.

Matt Hancock announced last night that people from various households in Greater Manchester, parts of East Lancashire and West Yorkshire are in some cases prohibited from meeting in their homes or gardens after an increase.

The move marks an exclamation point for a seven-day period in which the government has quickly taken action in numerous areas to combat the spread of the coronavirus.

It began by reintroducing quarantine restrictions for travelers returning to the UK from Spain on Saturday evening after Professor Chris Whitty warned ministers that "doing nothing is not an option" as infection rates on the continent increased.

Meanwhile, Sir Patrick Vallance reportedly warned Downing Street on Monday that Britain could only be two or three weeks behind Spain's second wave trajectory.

Ministers confirmed yesterday that self-isolation time for people with symptoms has been extended from seven days to ten days.

The swift action has led to accusations denied by the ministers that they overreact to expert advice to avoid repeating the mistakes made at the start of the outbreak.

This was the last seven days when the government's response to the virus became noticeably more aggressive.

Saturday: Ministers again impose quarantine measures against Spain after Chris Whitty warns: "Doing nothing is not an option."

Ministers announced on Saturday evening that Spain would be subject to quarantine travel restrictions within five hours due to increasing cases.

The government's Covid-O Committee met on Saturday afternoon after Mr. Hancock raised concerns about an increase in Spanish infections on Friday.

The group of six high-ranking ministers, including Michael Gove, Grant Shapps and Priti Patel, was apparently informed by Prof. Whitty, the chief medical officer, that the situation in Spain had deteriorated significantly in the past 48 hours.

Ministers were told that 15 out of 19 Spanish regions saw an increase in infections, but the "mastermind" was the fact that 10 Britons had tested positive recently when they returned from the country.

Prof. Whitty described the number as "statistically significant" and said "doing nothing is not an option" when ministers made the controversial decision to reinstate the quarantine and plunge holidaymakers and the travel industry into chaos.

Monday: Sir Patrick Vallance warns number 10 that Britain could be just a few weeks behind Spain's second wave trajectory

The government's chief scientific adviser is said to have issued a sharp warning to Downing Street earlier this week.

Sir Patrick reportedly told No10 that Britain could only be two or three weeks behind Spain in terms of an increase in case numbers.

His warning came when the travel industry pushed to relax the quarantine restrictions for Spain.

In fact, the government tightened its travel guides to Spain by banning all non-essential trips to the Canary and Balearic Islands to bring them in line with mainland Spain.

In the meantime, ministers actively monitored the situation in countries such as Belgium, Luxembourg and Croatia and suggested that they could also be quarantined. The trip to Luxembourg was banned last night.

Tuesday: Boris Johnson reinforces his rhetoric and warns that there are "signs of a second wave" in Europe

The Prime Minister defended the UK's decision to reinstate the 14-day quarantine for Spanish travel, warning that the cases would "bubble up again".

The Prime Minister insisted that the government act quickly to respond to what it believed to be a threat to the domestic fight against the corona virus.

He said: “We have to act quickly and decisively if we believe that the risks are blowing up again.

"Let us make it absolutely clear what is happening in Europe among some of our European friends. I am afraid that you are beginning to see signs of a second wave of the pandemic in some places."

Thursday morning: Boris Johnson says Britain must not pretend the crisis is over as ministers extend self-isolation time to 10 days

The Prime Minister expressed a pessimistic tone when he visited North Yorkshire when he said Britain should not give up efforts to stop the virus from spreading.

He warned that there were "between ten and 30 places where there was a little bubbling."

He said "hard local locks" were used to "get it under control in these cities."

"It is absolutely important that we as a country keep our focus and discipline and don't pretend that we are out of the forest somehow or that everything is over because it is not all over." & # 39; he said.

"The most important thing we can do is stop a second wave, a really harmful second wave that will have real consequences."

On the same day, ministers confirmed that the self-isolation period for people with coronavirus symptoms had been extended from seven days to ten days.

The tightening of the rules came about fears that people will actually be contagious longer than previously thought, as it has been shown that the moving average of daily cases has increased since the beginning of this month.

In the meantime, Mr. Hancock denied proposals that ministers fuel "hysteria" by warning of a second wave in Europe.

Thursday evening: Matt Hancock announces the reintroduction of a partial closure in the north of England at 9:16 p.m.

The results of a local lockout review in Leicester should be released yesterday afternoon, but the announcement has been delayed.

Mr. Hancock then completely surprised the nation when he announced on Twitter that 4.5 million people in the north of England would be subject to stricter restrictions from midnight.

The new restrictions mean that people from different households in Greater Manchester, parts of East Lancashire and West Yorkshire are prohibited from meeting in their homes or gardens after an increase in virus cases.

The timing of the announcement and the fact that the full details of the rules were only released after 11 p.m. triggered a violent backlash when critics claimed this was a "new low" for government communications during the crisis.

All faith leaders and other community leaders convey this message throughout society. But in the end it's up to everyone. It is up to the whole country to do it right and do it together. & # 39;

Eid al-Adha – the Festival of Sacrifice – concludes the annual Hajj pilgrimage.

It is the second major celebration of the Islamic calendar after Eid al-Fitr that marks the end of Ramadan.

Many Muslims celebrate Eid al-Adha, which can take two to four days by sacrificing an animal for celebrations that are shared in large groups by family, friends, and the needy.

Boris Johnson announced today that he was pressing the brake pedal to release the coronavirus lock, and announced that mandatory face mask wear will be extended after the infection rate doubled in July.

Mr Johnson said coronavirus cases had started to "sneak" – the National Statistics Office estimates that there are now 4,200 new infections daily, up from 2,000 a day in late June – and as a result, the government had no choice but to do so Delay the reopening of the economy.

He said that the planned return of casinos, bowling alleys and close contact services such as beauticians on August 1st had been postponed to August 15th "at the earliest". The relaxation of the rules for wedding receptions for up to 30 people and a pilot project to return crowds to sports venues were also delayed.

Compulsory facial wear is being extended to galleries, cinemas and places of worship in England, and there will now be a "larger police presence" to ensure that people wear masks and respect social distance.

Meanwhile, England's chief medical officer, Professor Chris Whitty, while standing next to the prime minister at a lunchtime press conference on Downing Street at midday, warned that Britain may have reached a limit on how much of society can be safely opened.

The people in the exclusion zone are worried about their livelihood.

Restaurant owner Johanne Banks informed Mail Online that her phone was open continuously and people were canceling their bookings after the Greater Manchester ban was reapplied.

So many people had canceled bookings at Crowded House Restaurant in Bury that she was considering closing for the weekend and sending staff back on government vacation.

She said, "It's lunchtime and we don't have a single person in the restaurant.

& # 39; All bookings for this evening and the rest of the weekend have been canceled.

"I really have to think about closing and then seeing what happens next week. It was a disaster. & # 39;

Bury is part of Greater Manchester and although fewer than five cases per day have been reported by Covid-19, which are contained in the restricted area.

Johanne said the new restrictions are surprising, especially since Bury is not one of the worst affected areas in the northwest.

She reopened her restaurant earlier this month after the government lifted the lock and customers poured back into the store.

"People were very happy to be back to normal and business was going well," she said.

“We were happy to be open and to see people who came back to the restaurant after so long a closure.

& # 39; This new lock is a blow. It's a setback, and many of the part-time employees may need to go back to the program. & # 39;

The restaurant employs 45 people in different shift patterns.

An adjacent beauty salon, also run by Johanne and her husband, had also opened its stores after the restrictions were lifted earlier this month.

“A lot of people came to us when they thought they could get back to normal. I understand why the government introduced the ban, but we are on the edge of the worst area, she said.

"I think people will be afraid to go out because nobody wants to catch the virus. Nobody in the restaurant is affected and we have taken all necessary precautions. & # 39;

A host in the city, who did not want to be named, said: “This could be a disaster for us if the lock stays in place too long. We have tried to ensure that our customers keep social distance and limit the number, but there are obviously people who have ignored this and caused the virus to spread. & # 39;

Barbara Tunstall, 88, who left Bury, said: “I agree with what the government in the north has done because a lot of people don't follow the rules.

“More fines have to be imposed – more and more people will violate the guidelines if they are not told not to follow them.

“I see so many people in the city without a mask now – I can't breathe mine and I still wear them.

"I bet people here will still visit their family despite the new rules, which worries me that the whole country, not just the north, will be closed again."

Paul Craig, 65, of Bury, said: “It is difficult for the government to change the rules for certain cities and people are moaning about them again, but we cannot blame them because the situation is constantly changing and they are changing need to change the rules to match.

"I am not worried about the virus and have lived my daily life trying to follow the restrictions, but my ex-wife came from Yorkshire this week and she is worried that she may return because of her may not see us for a long time during. & # 39;

James Brownson, 30, director of a landscaping company from Bury, said: “I am self-employed, so the first lock hit me hard because we had no suppliers and were forced to close.

& # 39; The new measures are completely backward – all pubs and shops were allowed to open and now this could collapse again.

“It seems strange that we can no longer make arrangements with our family – I am sad that I can no longer meet with mine.

“It's also crackers that people choose to book vacations. I canceled mine and I wasn't going to book more.

"Boris should have announced it on TV as he did before, but this only seems to have been spread on social media, so everyone shares it on Facebook and panics.

"As it goes, we'll be locked in a second time and then into a major recession."

Michelle Carol, 52, a market stall owner from Bury, said: “It is so confusing at the moment and we have only just managed to sell things on the market again to risk that everything will close again.

“Personally, I think it's stupid that we can still go to the pub with our family if we are near a lot of random people inside who could have the virus.

"At the moment, everything seems to be a guess at the government's decisions."

Sami Mahmood, 21, a shopkeeper from Bury, said: “The new rules in Manchester are good because everyone is safe, but it is rubbish for people who have been excited to get back to normal and see their family again.

“It got boring because it was very long, but it is important that everyone protects each other and keeps virus cases down.

"I think it makes sense to take the new rules with oath around the corner, as it is a family event and people need to think about caring for their families more than meeting each other."

Maria Stewart, 52, of Bury, said: “The whole situation with the new guidelines is crazy – people go to the beach in this hot weather instead of seeing their family, so they still mingle with people.

“I was going to sit in my garden with my family this afternoon, which I had to cancel.

"There's no logic behind it and it's confusing – I've always understood the rules so far."

Maria's daughter Leah Stewart, 24, said: “I have just been fired from my job at a travel company, but it makes no sense that people can still work with more than 30 people but cannot see their family.

“I wanted to see my friends this afternoon, but we really want to stick to the rules, but I'm not sure if others will do the same because it's so warm today.

"I hope the cases will drop when the government comes to check in three weeks."

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