ENTERTAINMENT

Gorilla was tested for coronavirus after being injured in a fight with his little brother at Miami Zoo


Open wide! Shango, the gorilla, receives a CORONAVIRUS TEST after having a fever after fighting with his little brother at the Miami Zoo

  • A 433-pound gorilla named Shango at Miami Zoo was tested for the corona virus after having a mild fever and being wounded in a fight earlier this week
  • The 31-year-old gorilla named Shango was tested negative for COVID-19 after confronting his 26-year-old brother Barney
  • Shango was treated at the Miami Hospital zoo on Wednesday after confronting his younger sibling
  • The brothers have been living in the Miami Zoo since they moved from the San Francisco Zoo in May 2017
  • The deadly flu-like virus is thought to come from animals. However, the risk of COVID-19 being transmitted from animals to humans is considered low.

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A 433-pound gorilla named Shango at Miami Zoo was tested for the corona virus after a mild fever and, according to zoo officials, was wounded in a fight with his younger sibling.

The 31-year-old Shango's test was negative when he was treated at Miami Zoo on Wednesday after confronting 26-year-old Barney.

A medical team also performed a TB test and bronchoscopy, which they used to examine Shango's lungs.

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Shango is pictured from above as the medical team examines a wound on his arm

Shanago, a 433-pound gorilla at Miami Zoo, was tested for the corona virus after a mild fever and, according to zoo officials, was wounded in a fight with his younger sibling

Shanago, a 433-pound gorilla at Miami Zoo, was tested for the corona virus after a mild fever and, according to zoo officials, was wounded in a fight with his younger sibling

A member of the medical team takes a swab sample while Shango is being treated

A member of the medical team takes a swab sample while Shango is being treated

A sample of a swab from Shango is prepared for the test

A sample of a swab from Shango is prepared for the test

A medical team member takes a closer look at Shango's eyes

A medical team member takes a closer look at Shango's eyes

The brothers, both lowland gorillas, have been living in Miami Zoo since moving from the San Francisco Zoo in May 2017, WFOR-TV reported in Miami.

Animal fights are not uncommon, but they usually involve more posture than actual fights.

The confrontation between Shango and Barney had grown serious enough to leave the older siblings biting wounds.

Pictured is one of the wounds that Shango suffered after fighting with his sibling

Pictured is one of the wounds that Shango suffered after fighting with his sibling

Shango is pictured after the medical team has finished treating the arm wound

Shango is pictured after the medical team has finished treating the arm wound

The team also performed a TB test and bronchoscopy to examine Shango's lungs

The team also performed a TB test and bronchoscopy to examine Shango's lungs

The zoo's medical staff decided to immobilize Shango for treatment after realizing he was giving extra protection to an injured arm.

An animal health team that treated the bite wounds found no permanent damage, according to WFORTV.

Shango also had X-rays taken and had an ultrasound test. No skeletal fractures or abnormalities were found.

The gorilla has since returned to its zoo habitat, which has not yet decided whether to reunite the siblings. This depends on behavioral tests as well as on Shanghai's physical recovery.

The deadly flu-like virus is thought to come from animals. However, the risk of COVID-19 being transmitted from animals to humans is considered low.

Shango also had X-rays taken and had an ultrasound test. No skeletal fractures or abnormalities were found

Shango also had X-rays taken and had an ultrasound test. No skeletal fractures or abnormalities were found

The medical team takes a closer look at Shango's teeth

The medical team takes a closer look at Shango's teeth

During the pandemic, it was confirmed that at least two domestic cats suffer from respiratory diseases, both of which belong to suspected or confirmed cases.

In addition, these people showed symptoms more than a week before their cats became ill.

In a report released in June, the CDC warned that Americans with COVID-19 should stay away from their dogs and cats, as humans can in some cases infect animals.

The brothers Shango and Barney (photo), both lowland gorillas, have been living in Miami Zoo since they moved from the San Francisco Zoo in May 2017

The brothers Shango and Barney (photo), both lowland gorillas, have been living in Miami Zoo since they moved from the San Francisco Zoo in May 2017

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