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Gone with the wind Olivia de Havilland dies at 104


Olivia de Havilland, a star in Hollywood's golden age and two-time Oscar winner, died at the age of 104.

The British-American lady, best known for her role as Melanie Hamilton in Gone with the Wind (1939), died peacefully on Saturday in her home in Paris, France, Entertainment Weekly reports.

Less than a month earlier, de Havilland, the oldest surviving star of the classic, celebrated her birthday on July 1st.

De Havilland enjoyed a remarkable life and career and appeared in 49 major films that made her a global icon and won her two Academy Awards for To Each His Own (1946) and The Heiress (1949).

RIP: Gone with the Wind (pictured at the 36th Cesar Awards in Paris in 2011) died at the age of 104

De Havilland was born in Tokyo in 1916 and was the older sister of fellow actress Joan Fontaine. They moved to California with theirs Actress mother Lillian in 1919 after her father Walter, a British patent attorney, fled with her housekeeper.

De Havilland and Fontaine shared one of the longest rivalries and feuds between siblings in the film industry.

The roots of alienation have never been released, but the divide is said to have led to a professional competition that may have been fueled by her mother.

Both sisters were nominated for the 1942 Oscar for Best Actress, which Fontaine won for her role in Alfred Hitchcock's "Suspicion."

De Havilland was nominated for Hold Back the Dawn, in which she appeared alongside Charles Boyer as a shy American school teacher who was manipulated by a Romanian gigolo.

De Havilland (right) and Fontaine (left) shared one of the longest sibling rivalries and feuds in the film industry

De Havilland (right) and Fontaine (left) shared one of the longest sibling rivalries and feuds in the film industry

A series of high-profile spats between the sisters followed, usually in relation to the desired film roles or the affection of powerful men like billionaire Howard Hughes.

When de Havilland finally won her first Oscar for To Each His Own, Fontaine was waiting in the starting blocks to congratulate her sister, but de Havilland is said to have insulted her and left.

They reconciled several times over the years, but their relationship finally ended after their mother's death in 1975, after Fontaine was originally not invited to the memorial service.

To promote her 1978 memoir No Bed of Roses, Fontaine said: “You can divorce both your sister and your husbands. I don't see them at all and I don't mean to.

"I got married first, won the Oscar before Olivia, and if I die first, she'll undoubtedly be angry because I hit her!" she told the Hollywood reporter at the time.

When Joan Fontaine died in December 2013, De Havilland released a statement saying that she was "shocked and sad."

They reconciled several times over the years, but their relationship finally ended after their mother's death in 1975, after Fontaine was originally not invited to the memorial service

They reconciled several times over the years, but their relationship finally ended after their mother's death in 1975, after Fontaine was originally not invited to the memorial service

De Havilland made her on-screen debut in Max Reinhardt's elaborate adaptation of Shakespeare's comedy A Midsummer Night’s Dream from 1935.

Her big breakthrough came later that year, however, when she appeared with Errol Flynn in Captain Blood and in 1938 with the same legendary lead actor in The Adventures of the Robin Hood.

It was rumored that Flynn and De Havilland are lovers, although Ms. De Havilland said in an interview in 2009 that nothing had ever happened between us, adding: “What I felt for Errol Flynn was not a trivial matter at all. I was terribly attracted to him. And you know, I still feel it I still feel very close to him today. "

De Havilland signed a long-term contract with Warner Brother’s Studios and starred in seven other films alongside Flynn.

However, she later initiated a landmark lawsuit against studio director Jack L. Warner in 1944, ending the binding seven-year contracts for all Hollywood actors who became known as the De Havilland Act.

The ruling "made it clear that California law limits the time that an employer can enforce a contract with an employee to seven years."

Golden Era: The British-American lady is perhaps best known for her role as Melanie Hamilton in Gone with the Wind (1939)

Golden Era: The British-American lady is perhaps best known for her role as Melanie Hamilton in Gone with the Wind (1939)

In her twilight years, De Havilland rarely made headlines. In 2017 she became the oldest person to be called a lady.

Olivia spoke of the honor at the time and said in a statement that she was "extremely proud that the Queen appointed me Lady Commander of the Order of the British Empire".

The following year, she made headlines again when she tried to sue showrunners Ryan Murphy and FX for their series Fued: Betty and Joan, in which she appeared as a character.

The & # 39; FX series puts words in Miss de Havilland's words that are inaccurate and contradict the reputation that she has built up in her 80 years of professional life, and in particular refuses to clap about other actors in order to be alone to attract media attention itself, "her lawyers claimed.

The complaint specifically referred to the fictionalized de Havilland, who Fontaine called "bitch". The lawsuit was later brought up by a California appeals court citing the first change.

Representation: Oscar winner Catherine Zeta-Jones played Olivia in Ryan Murphy's hit series Feud, although the actress was not happy that FX had not obtained her permission for the show

Representation: Oscar winner Catherine Zeta-Jones played Olivia in Ryan Murphy's hit series Feud, although the actress was not happy that FX had not obtained her permission for the show

Hollywood royalty: Olivia two Oscars for Best Actress for To Each His Own (1946) and The Heiress (1949)

Hollywood royalty: Olivia two Oscars for Best Actress for To Each His Own (1946) and The Heiress (1949)

Honors: Olivia imagined holding her Honoegree of Doctor of Letters certificate from the University of Hertfordshire, Hatfiel

Honors: Olivia introduced herself as holding an honorary doctorate in letters from the University of Hertfordshire, Hatfield

Ms. De Havilland married a Frenchman, Pierre Galante, whom she met at the 1953 Cannes Film Festival, and then moved permanently to France.

At the time, she said famously, "Of course, what shakes you when you first come to France is the fact that all French speak French – even the kids."

Mrs. De Havilland had a son, Benjamin Goodrich, from her first marriage to journalist Marcus Goodrich, which divorced in 1953.

Benjamin Goodrich died at the age of 42 from a heart condition caused by his suffering from Hodgkin's disease.

She had a daughter, Gisèle Galante, with Mr. Galante, from whom she separated in 1962.

De Havilland had her last appearance in the 1988 British drama The Woman He Loved.

Before her death, Ms. De Havilland had lived in the same three-story house in Bois de Boulogne, the forest in western Paris that she first moved to in the 1950s.

The source said that the funeral arrangements for Ms. De Havilland would be kept private and that commemorative donations should be made to the American cathedral in Paris.

A star is born: Olivia pictured in 1948

A star is born: Olivia pictured in 1948

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