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General practitioners should "stop" routine care and focus on Covid vaccinations


Boris Johnson is set to unveil a new Army-run plan to distribute Britain's coronavirus surge tonight as Number 10 seeks to step up Britain's sluggish vaccination campaign.

The Prime Minister is expected to announce the new strategy, which has been drawn up by senior military battlefield planners, at a press conference on Downing Street tonight at 5:00 p.m. Hopefully the new battle plan will increase Britain's chances of fulfilling Mr Johnson's lofty promise to vaccinate 13 million people and end the lockdown by March.

So far, the country's vaccination program has been plagued by supply and staff shortages, logistical problems and bureaucratic obstacles that have strangled its expansion. This means that since it launched a month ago, only 1.3 million Britons across the UK have suffered the sting.

Today's figures show that the NHS in England has managed to vaccinate nearly 1.1 million people since mass vaccination began. There were more than 300,000 doses on the program between December 8th and January 3rd in the final week of the Pfizer-only plan was 27 percent more than the previous week.

Defense Department chiefs have been instructed to develop plans to distribute the shock evenly to the most vulnerable in order to immunize them by mid-February.

Government sources said no troops are currently being drafted to help. Military brass was only recruited to help with the rollout strategy, according to Sun. Despite pressure from prominent figures, including Labor colleague Lord Blunkett, to involve soldiers directly in the program.

A source told the newspaper last night: "The Prime Minister is nearing the introduction of vaccination as a military operation, and you will see that at tomorrow's press conference."

It came after Secretary of Defense Ben Wallace said last week the military was "ready" to dispense up to 100,000 doses a day, if ever requested by the health service.

Boris is expected to be accompanied by Brigadier Phil Prosser, who will work out the main plans tonight, and Sir Simon Stevens. The head of NHS England is likely to have questions about a decision to instruct general practitioners to cancel routine appointments so they can prioritize Covid vaccinations.

It emerged last night that doctors had been given instructions stating that the jolts should be their "top priority" – with other "non-essential" activities possibly being postponed for weeks. NHS England has already advised operations to focus on vaccine delivery, with jab appointments taking precedence over everything else.

The British Medical Association, the medical trade organization, is also calling on general practitioners to “re-prioritize and postpone other activities” in the coming weeks. Its guidelines suggest that unless urgent, health workers should "stop essential work" in order to accelerate the pace of rollout, The Daily Telegraph reported last night.

There are now fears that distracting general practitioners from normal care could drag the NHS into another health crisis. Approximately 27 million general practitioner appointments were "lost" during the first wave of the pandemic, raising concerns that thousands of cancers were missed and significantly worse for patients with other conditions such as asthma and diabetes.

Boris Johnson (pictured this morning) is set to unveil a new Army-run plan to distribute Britain's coronavirus bursts tonight as Number 10 seeks to speed up the UK's sluggish vaccination campaign

The Prime Minister is expected to announce the new strategy, which has been drawn up by senior military battlefield planners, at a press conference on Downing Street tonight at 5:00 p.m. Government sources said no troops are currently being drafted to help

The Prime Minister is expected to announce the new strategy, as drafted by senior military battlefield planners, at a press conference on Downing Street this evening at 5:00 p.m. Government sources said no troops are currently being drafted to help

John Elphinstone receives the Oxford / AstraZeneca coronavirus vaccine administered by nurse Marianne Stewart at the Pentlands Medical Center in Edinburgh

John Elphinstone receives the Oxford / AstraZeneca coronavirus vaccine administered by nurse Marianne Stewart at the Pentlands Medical Center in Edinburgh

In other vaccine news today:

  • Older Britons refuse to take Pfizer's Covid vaccine because they'd rather wait for the English one, a general practitioner in Stockon-on-Tees has claimed.
  • Numbers from NHS England showed 1,092,885 people were vaccinated against Covid-19 between December 8 and January 3, an increase of more than a quarter from the previous week;
  • The approval of Covid vaccine batches is set to be accelerated drastically as the UK regulator announced that the process would be cut from up to 20 days to just four days.
  • Elderly people have canceled urgently needed Covid vaccination appointments because doctors did not receive their supplies on time.

Older Britons refuse to take Pfizer's Covid vaccine because they'd rather wait for the English one.

A high profile doctor said patients had turned down the option to receive the Pfizer coronavirus vaccine, saying they would "wait for the English one."

Paul Williams, former Stockton South Labor MP, said it shows nationalism has ramifications as it delayed the sting at the height of the pandemic.

The Pfizer / BioNTech vaccine was made available to patients in early December, while the Oxford / AstraZeneca version was approved on December 30th.

Dr. Williams was a general practitioner before turning to politics, continued to visit patients while he was a MP to maintain a connection with them, and has worked on the NHS's fight against Covid-19 since being voted out in 2019.

On Twitter, he wrote: “Some local patients turned down an offer this weekend to have a Covid vaccine when they found out it was the Pfizer vaccine. "I will wait for the Englishman".

“People at risk of death in the depths of a pandemic. A lesson that nationalism has consequences. & # 39;

Dr. Williams was named on the New Years Honor Roll for his contributions to Parliament and the health service.

Defense Secretary Ben Wallace hinted last week that the military had plans for "up to 250 teams of mobile, medically trained workers who could deliver the vaccine across the country." He said these workers are able to "deliver over 100,000 a day if requested by the NHS".

There follows growing concern over the slow start of the UK vaccination campaign, as only 530,000 Oxford puffs were cleared for use this week. This was a tiny fraction of the 30 million doses the UK had promised to be ready in time for the vaccine to be approved.

Testing initial doses of vaccines took 20 days – with only one batch tested, until that number doubled yesterday.

Officials have now made an effort to address the problem, cutting the time it takes to approve each batch to four days. Regulators can now test more than one batch at a time.

However, a swift acceleration is needed if the UK is to vaccinate the massive amounts needed to ease Covid restrictions.

Eight months ago, when the nation was still in the grip of the first wave, Economy Minister Alok Sharma insisted that adequate doses would be available.

He announced that the government had signed a contract with AstraZeneca to manufacture 100 million doses of the Oxford vaccine, 30 million of which would be ready by September.

Results were delivered at the end of November – the vaccine worked. And AstraZeneca insisted it could deliver enough vaccine to fill 20 million injections by the end of 2020.

ENGLAND VACCINE PROGRAM INCREASES PFIZER ONLY PLAN BY 27% IN LAST WEEK

Today's figures from NHS England showed that 1,092,885 people were vaccinated against Covid-19 between December 8th and January 3rd.

654,810 of them were over 80 years old – the group with the highest priority – which means that about one in five people in this age group has now been vaccinated. There are an estimated 3.4 million people over 80 in England.

Another 438,075 people under the age of 80 received a vaccine in the first 3.5 weeks of the program. Most or even all of them will have been health and care workers who are also high on the priority list.

According to the NHS, 308,541 people were vaccinated in the week ending Jan. 3, up 27 percent from 243,039 the week prior to Dec. 27.

So far, none of the statistics include people vaccinated with the Oxford University and AstraZeneca vaccine that came into use on Monday 4th January.

The government aims to immunize 13.9 million of the country's most vulnerable people by mid-February so that national lockdown rules can be lifted.

To achieve this ambitious goal, it must accelerate its vaccination program at breakneck speed to hit an average of 2 million a week, including this week.

Part of helping this process is a controversial plan of only offering people the first dose initially and postponing the second for up to three months later. However, NHS data shows that 19,981 people have already received two full doses.

During the first phase of vaccination, shocks were given to 107 hospital centers and 595 local vaccination sites. The government said this will increase to more than 1,000 vaccination stations by the end of this week, of which 730 are already operational.

Though a little less than the 30 million Mr Sharma had promised, it would still be a strong start, despite the company admitting that only 4 million of these were in vials and ready to go.

It took another month for the Medicines and Health Products Regulatory Authority (MHRA) to confirm that the vaccine was safe and effective.

But by the time that approval was finally announced a little over a week ago, the four million cans had somehow shrunk to 530,000. With at least 25 million people in the government's priority vaccination groups, that number was scanty. Why were so few vaccines available?

AstraZeneca was slightly too promising – enough was made to give the UK an initial dose of 15 million – up from the previously promised 20 million. But it produced the four million vial vaccines it promised. Rather, the main delay was the MHRA batch test program. Due to the quality control requirements, each individual batch must be tested separately by both AstraZeneca and the MHRA.

Quality control is carried out in the laboratory of the MHRA National Institute for Biological Standards and Control in Potters Bar, Hertfordshire. The NIBSC receives samples from each batch of vaccine and performs a series of tests.

A complex element is making sure that each vial contains the correct dose. Scientists also need to make sure that the push does what it is intended to do. AstraZeneca runs a series of tests and the NIBSC runs its own tests in parallel. When the two are done they make sure the results match and when they match a batch test certificate is issued.

Until yesterday this had only happened once – on December 29th – when the first batch of 530,000 cans was approved. If Britain is to vaccinate the 13 million most vulnerable people on the top four levels of its priority list by mid-February, the process needs to accelerate rapidly.

A third single-dose vaccine from US pharmaceutical giant Johnson & Johnson is expected to be available just a few weeks after approval. Britain has ordered 30 million doses of the sting from Janssen – Johnson and Johnson's Belgian pharmaceuticals division – with an option for an additional 22 million.

Sir John Bell, Regius Professor at Oxford University and advisor to the UK Vaccine Taskforce, said the vaccine was "very likely to be effective".

In the meantime, the Prime Minister will hold a press conference this afternoon to present new distribution plans for the army's elaborated strikes.

Defense Department chiefs have been instructed to work out plans to distribute the thrusts evenly to increase the chances of thrusting 13 million by the middle of next month. The Sun reports that no troops will be involved at this point.

It has become known that the approval of Covid vaccine batches is to be accelerated drastically in order to significantly advance the stab campaign.

Amid growing concerns about the slow pace of rollout, sources have said testing will be reduced from as little as 20 days to just four days.

The drug and health regulator in charge of controls is also expected to increase staff to speed up the mass vaccination program.

The vaccination campaign is FINALLY starting to accelerate: The approval time for cans is reduced from twenty to five days

The approval of Covid vaccine batches is to be accelerated drastically in an enormous push for the stab campaign.

Amid growing concerns about the slow pace of rollout, sources told the Mail that testing would be reduced from as little as 20 days to just four days.

The drug and health regulator in charge of controls is also expected to increase staff to speed up the mass vaccination program.

It has just approved a second shipment of 500,000 cans of the Oxford Jab that delivers over a million.

It comes as the jab that is co-manufactured with AstraZeneca is brought out of GP surgeries today.

Today's expansion is in the hope that more than 700 sites will deliver vaccines by the end of the week.

Seven mass vaccination centers will open next week in London, Newcastle, Manchester, Birmingham, Bristol, Surrey and Stevenage.

The vaccine is vital as it is much easier to distribute than the Pfizer version, which must be stored at minus 70 ° C.

MPs have questioned why there were only half a million cans of Oxford's jab available in the first week – despite promises that 30 million would be ready last September.

Coronavirus deaths rose to over 1,000 yesterday for the first time since April, while cases climbed to another record high of 62,322.

The mail highlighted a number of vaccine rollout issues that are critical to reducing the pandemic and lifting coronavirus restrictions.

A government source yesterday admitted that the initial rollout of the Oxford Stitch was "slow" but promised a big acceleration towards the end of this week.

It has just approved a second shipment of 500,000 cans of the Oxford Jab that delivers over a million.

Today's expansion is in the hope that more than 700 sites will deliver vaccines by the end of the week.

Seven mass vaccination centers will open next week in London, Newcastle, Manchester, Birmingham, Bristol, Surrey and Stevenage.

The vaccine is vital as it is much easier to distribute than the Pfizer version, which must be stored at minus 70 ° C.

MPs have questioned why there were only half a million cans of Oxford's jab available in the first week – despite promises that 30 million would be ready last September.

Coronavirus deaths rose to over 1,000 yesterday for the first time since April, while cases climbed to another record high of 62,322.

The mail highlighted a number of vaccine rollout issues that are vital to reducing the pandemic and lifting coronavirus restrictions.

A government source yesterday admitted that the initial rollout of the Oxford Stitch was "slow" but promised a big acceleration towards the end of this week.

Meanwhile, Vaccines Minister Nadhim Zahawi said Public Health England was "on one foot" to give doses every day of the week.

More details will be announced tonight when NHS England executive Sir Simon Stevens appears at a press conference on Downing Street.

Doubts about the plan to inject 13 million vulnerable people by mid-February have increased since Boris Johnson slammed the country into lockdown Monday night.

Topics included the bureaucracy that voluntary vaccines faced, the delivery of batches to nursing homes, the distribution network, and the time it took to approve each batch.

So far, the MHRA's National Institute for Biological Standards and Control has checked the batches individually at its Hertfordshire site.

This time-consuming process has been blamed for slowing deployment. Only 530,000 of the four million available doses of the Oxford Jab had passed ratings before last night.

The process has been changed so that more than one batch can be assessed at the same time, reducing the timescale from up to 20 days to just four or five.

An MHRA spokesperson said: “We are working closely with manufacturer AstraZeneca to ensure that batches of the vaccine are released as quickly as possible.

“Biological medicines like vaccines are inherently complex and independent tests, such as those conducted by the National Institute, are critical to ensuring quality and safety.

Appointments for Covid-19 jabs will be AXED because the general practitioners did not receive the vaccine on time

Elderly people have canceled urgently needed Covid vaccination appointments because doctors did not receive their supplies on time.

Patients across the country booked for their first push have since been contacted to learn they will have to wait longer.

Many general practitioners say they still haven't received their first batch of the vaccine, despite being promised before Christmas. Some say they received multiple canceled shipments.

Frontline NHS workers are also missing out on vaccinations. In one case, employees stood in line for hours outside a hospital to cancel their appointments due to a planning error.

It has sparked new fears that Boris Johnson will fail to deliver on his promise to protect 13 million of the UK's most vulnerable by the middle of next month. Last night, Professor Martin Marshall, Chairman of the Royal College of GPs said, “We need to have more than 2 million vaccinations a week – this is a challenging but necessary goal.

"Last-minute changes to vaccine delivery schedules, as some GPs report, only create confusion for patients and a lot of hard work for practices that need to quickly adjust their schedules and minimize them."

Senior Labor MP Kevan Jones told how a group of doctors in his constituency in North Durham were promised a delivery on December 16.

The family doctors on Chester-le-Street were then told that the deliveries would not arrive until January 4th – and they now expect "at the earliest" today.

Even when the shipment arrives, it will only contain one batch of Pfizer's 975-dose vaccine and a "possibility" of 400 doses of the AstraZeneca vaccine. This is not enough for all nursing home residents.

Mr Jones warned Vaccination Secretary Zahawi in a letter last night: “The local GPs have drawn up extensive plans for the vaccine to be given, but this is not being supported by vaccines that don't arrive or government raising expectations that can't are hit. & # 39;

In Sussex, Meads Medical Center had to cancel appointments booked for the next week after a scheduled delivery of Pfizer vaccine to care for those over 80 was canceled. Now only a small amount of the AstraZeneca vaccine is expected.

Castle Medical Center and Abbey Medical Center in Kenilworth, Warwickshire, had to cancel appointments for those over 80 last week due to insufficient doses. A similar story was told by Dr. Rosemary Leonard, a general practitioner in south London. She wrote on Twitter: “We rarely want to go, but we don't have vaccines. WHY? & # 39;

Meanwhile, NHS staff in Scotland were left standing in the cold outside the Royal Infirmary in Glasgow for hours to get bumped as there were no staff on duty to administer them.

Some left without being vaccinated on Tuesday in the chaos. NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde have apologized.

A government spokesman said last night: "This is the largest vaccination program in the history of the NHS.

"It's accelerating every day, and by the end of this week we will have vaccinations in over 1,000 locations."

"The institute has expanded its capacity to ensure that multiple batches can be tested at the same time and that this can be done as quickly as possible without compromising quality and safety."

The delivery of the Oxford Jab to 775 GP surgeries, which will take place starting today, is another crucial step.

This will enable vaccination to be significantly accelerated in nursing homes where only 10 percent of residents have previously received the vaccine.

So far, only hospitals have received the Oxford vaccine. On the Commons yesterday, Tory MPs called on Mr Johnson to speed up the introduction of the vaccine so that lockdown restrictions can be lifted as soon as possible.

Huw Merriman, a member of Bexhill and Battle, said: "Every shot in the arm should be viewed as a student who can return to the classroom."

Mr Zahawi said Public Health England had agreed to distribute the vaccine seven days a week, despite concerns that it would not work on Sundays.

He told talkRadio: “If you have to deliver on a Sunday, you will deliver on a Sunday. They have been delivering six days a week so far as the NHS told the vaccines to go out.

“They are well on their way seven days a week as we are getting more vaccines. The PHE leader has said that they have always stood on a seven day foundation as is required of them, and they will continue to do so.

"That is absolutely a priority for her and for the entire NHS."

In the meantime, older people have canceled much-needed Covid vaccination appointments because doctors did not receive their supplies on time.

Patients across the country booked for their first push have since been contacted to learn they will have to wait longer.

Many general practitioners say they still haven't received their first batch of the vaccine, despite being promised before Christmas. Some say they received multiple canceled shipments.

Frontline NHS workers are also missing out on vaccinations. In one case, employees stood in line for hours outside a hospital to cancel their appointments due to a planning error.

It has sparked new fears that Boris Johnson will fail to deliver on his promise to protect 13 million of the UK's most vulnerable by the middle of next month. Last night, Professor Martin Marshall, Chairman of the Royal College of GPs said, “We need to have more than 2 million vaccinations a week – this is a challenging but necessary goal.

"Last-minute changes to vaccine delivery schedules, as some GPs report, only create confusion for patients and a lot of hard work for practices that need to quickly adjust their schedules and minimize them."

Senior Labor MP Kevan Jones told how a group of doctors in his constituency in North Durham were promised a delivery on December 16.

The family doctors on Chester-le-Street were then told that the deliveries would not arrive until January 4th – and they now expect "at the earliest" today.

Even when the shipment arrives, it will only contain one batch of Pfizer's 975-dose vaccine and a "possibility" of 400 doses of the AstraZeneca vaccine. This is not enough for all nursing home residents.

Mr Jones warned Vaccination Secretary Zahawi in a letter last night: “The local GPs have drawn up extensive plans for the vaccine to be given, but this is not being supported by vaccines that don't arrive or government raising expectations that can't are hit. & # 39;

In Sussex, Meads Medical Center had to cancel appointments booked for the next week after a scheduled delivery of Pfizer vaccine to care for those over 80 was canceled. Now only a small amount of the AstraZeneca vaccine is expected.

Castle Medical Center and Abbey Medical Center in Kenilworth, Warwickshire, had to cancel appointments for those over 80 last week due to insufficient doses. A similar story was told by Dr. Rosemary Leonard, a general practitioner in south London. She wrote on Twitter: “We rarely want to go, but we don't have vaccines. WHY? & # 39;

Meanwhile, NHS staff in Scotland were left standing in the cold outside the Royal Infirmary in Glasgow for hours to get bumped as there were no staff on duty to administer them.

Some left without being vaccinated on Tuesday in the chaos. NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde have apologized.

A government spokesman said last night: "This is the largest vaccination program in the history of the NHS.

"It's accelerating every day, and by the end of this week we will have vaccinations in over 1,000 locations."

Today's figures from NHS England showed that 1,092,885 people were vaccinated against Covid-19 between December 8th and January 3rd.

654,810 of them were over 80 years old – the group with the highest priority – which means that about one in five people in this age group has now been vaccinated. There are an estimated 3.4 million people over 80 in England.

Another 438,075 people under the age of 80 received a vaccine in the first 3.5 weeks of the program. Most or even all of them will have been health and care workers who are also high on the priority list.

According to the NHS, 308,541 people were vaccinated in the week ending Jan. 3, up 27 percent from 243,039 the week prior to Dec. 27.

So far, none of the statistics include people vaccinated with the Oxford University and AstraZeneca vaccine that came into use on Monday 4th January.

The government aims to immunize 13.9 million of the country's most vulnerable people by mid-February so that national lockdown rules can be lifted.

Um dieses ehrgeizige Ziel zu erreichen, muss es sein Impfprogramm mit rasender Geschwindigkeit beschleunigen, um durchschnittlich 2 Millionen pro Woche zu erreichen, einschließlich dieser Woche.

Ein Teil der Unterstützung dieses Prozesses ist ein umstrittener Plan, den Menschen zunächst nur die erste Dosis anzubieten und die zweite um bis zu drei Monate später zu verschieben. NHS-Daten zeigen jedoch, dass 19.981 Personen bereits zwei volle Dosen erhalten haben.

Während der ersten Phase der Impfungen wurden an 107 Krankenhauszentren und 595 lokalen Impfstellen Stöße abgegeben. Die Regierung sagte, dass dies bis Ende dieser Woche auf mehr als 1.000 Impfstationen erhöht werden wird, von denen 730 bereits in Betrieb sind.

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