ENTERTAINMENT

GCSE and A-level exams will be facilitated in 2021


Next year's exams will be dramatically eased while the record-breaking inflation rate of the summer can continue, the Education Minister announced.

Students completing their GCSEs and degrees in 2021 will be given advance notice of the topics covered in the exam and allowed to take study aids such as reference sheets into the exam room.

Labeling standards will also be relaxed, it was announced.

Gavin Williamson was determined not to cancel the exams in England next year – despite the "unprecedented learning disabilities" caused by Covid.

Students scheduled to take their GCSEs and A-Levels in England next year will receive the topics in advance and can take reference sheets to the exam rooms as they have lost a lot of class time due to Covid-19

Exams in Wales were canceled next year while the Scottish Government decided to replace the GCSE equivalent National 5 with exams.

After initially announcing a three-week delay in the national exam schedule to allow students additional revision time, Mr. Williamson has introduced additional "exceptional steps" to ensure fairness.

This summer's exam candidates achieved top marks at an unprecedented level after the government had to abandon its disaster to try to hand out the grades given by a computer algorithm.

But Mr Williamson, who previously said the inflation tests "devalue" class devaluation, has now given next year's candidates permission to achieve equally "generous" results.

Ministers will lower the limits so that students will not be judged more severely than this year's candidates.

However, the decision to allow top grades to rise further could end up affecting those taking exams in 2022 as results return to historical norm.

Other steps taken to ease the pressure on students next summer include warning about upcoming exam topics.

In many cases, they are allowed to include written material such as formula sheets, and additional papers are scheduled in case candidates are ill or self-isolating.

If students do not have all the opportunities to take an exam, their teachers' estimates are accepted as final grades.

Coronavirus continues to wreak havoc on the number of missed students. Figures show that more than a fifth of secondary school students were absent last week – the second consecutive week this happened.

And one of the most complex problems – how to maintain fairness when different areas of the country have experienced different disruptions – has yet to be resolved.

Education Minister Gavin Williamson pictured is determined to hold exams in England next year. Officials in Wales have already canceled next year's exams while Scotland decided that their version of the GCSEs will be determined by assessment

Education Minister Gavin Williamson pictured is determined to hold exams in England next year. Officials in Wales have already canceled next year's exams while Scotland decided that their version of the GCSEs will be determined by assessment

The Ministry of Education said it would form an "expert group" to address the problem.

Mr. Williamson said, “Exams are the best way to empower young people to show what they can do … I know students face unprecedented learning disabilities.

"So the exams will be different next year and will take extraordinary steps to ensure they are as fair as possible."

Geoff Barton, general secretary of the Association of School and College Leaders, said, "This solution for next year's A-Level and GCSE exams will make it as fair as possible under the circumstances."

Dr. Mary Bousted, Joint Secretary General of the National Education Union, said: “It is to be welcomed that the government has finally shown that it is beginning to understand the concerns of teachers, parents and students about next summer's exams and has recognized that we cannot plow without further adjustments. & # 39;

The government also announced that full Ofsted inspections would not resume until the summer.

Labor shadow education secretary Kate Green said today that students have seen "so many disruptions this year".

When asked if she thought easing exams this year would devalue grades, she told Good Morning Britain: “It would be completely wrong to base the results of students taking exams next summer on these Way to look at.

“In fact, they had it so much harder than almost all students, they had so many disorders.

"I think this year is far from easy, we should recognize the very challenging circumstances under which you studied."