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Fitbit introduces the new smartwatch Sense, which measures stress


Fitbit introduces the new smartwatch Sense, which measures skin temperature and heart rate to monitor your stress and take over the Apple Watch

  • Fitbit introduced a new smartwatch called the Sense for $ 329.95
  • The device can monitor the stress levels of the wearer
  • It uses an EDA sensor to measure heart rate and skin temperature
  • Users can see when their stress levels are increasing in the companion app

Fitbit introduced a new smartwatch that can determine the wearer's stress level by monitoring heart rate and skin temperature.

Called Sense, the device contains an EDA scanning app on the wrist that tracks the wearer's electrodermal activity to determine the body's response to anxiety.

Fitbit's companion app displays a graph of trends over time and provides tools for understanding and managing stress.

Sense was designed with the aim of surpassing the Apple Watch, which has become one of the top health monitoring devices.

Fitbit is expected to ship the wearable item starting September 25th, priced at $ 329.95.

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Fitbit introduced a new smartwatch that can help determine the wearer's stress by monitoring heart rate and skin temperature. Called Sense, the device contains an EDA scanning app on the wrist that tracks the wearer's electrodermal activity to determine the body's response to anxiety

Sense works by holding their palm over the screen and breathing for a few seconds. This allows the technology to capture heart rate and skin temperature, all of which are captured by the EDA sensor.

The app keeps a log of the various rates and temperatures to understand how your body reacts at certain times so you can understand what may be causing stress.

The smartwatch also uses the skin temperature sensor to uncover other stories about your body, such as: B. fever or ovulation.

Together with the new function, Sense has an OLED touchscreen, an integrated GPS and is waterproof up to 50 meters – similar to the Apple Watch.

Fitbit is expected to ship the wearable item starting September 25, priced at $ 329.95

Sense works by holding their palm over the screen and breathing for a few seconds, allowing the technology to capture heart rate and skin temperature

Fitbit will ship the wearable on September 25, priced at $ 329.95. Sense works by holding their palm over the screen and breathing for a few seconds, allowing the technology to capture heart rate and skin temperature

Earlier Fitbits support Amazon's intelligent assistant, Alexa. However, later this year the company will add the Google Assistant.

Although Sense is similar to the Apple Watch, the two are different.

Apple didn't add a measure of stress to its wearable, but some users have found the breathing exercises help them manage such events, reports Business Insider.

Apple allegedly originally intended to have the watch detect stress through sensors that measure the conductivity of the skin, but the technology was scrapped because it wasn't performing consistently enough, the Wall Street Journal reported in 2015.

However, another company has unveiled a wearable that measures body temperature, heart rate and breathing rate.

Earlier Fitbits support Amazon's intelligent assistant, Alexa. However, later this year the company will add the Google Assistant

Earlier Fitbits support Amazon's intelligent assistant, Alexa. However, later this year the company will add the Google Assistant

The Oura ring is a smart ring that is worn on a finger like a wedding and is used by the NBA to collect biometric data that doctors can use to display "disease probability values" for each player.

The Smart Ring was originally developed as a commercial device for people interested in monitoring their sleep quality. Access to biometric data collected overnight is made accessible via a smartphone app.

In March, Oura announced it would be testing its rings as a COVID-19 screening tool with health care workers in San Francisco, and in April the company announced a nationwide testing program in partnership with the Rockefeller Neuroscience Institute at West Virginia University.

Initial test results were promising, showing that COVID-19 symptoms can be detected with 90 percent accuracy up to three days before symptoms appear.

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