ENTERTAINMENT

First, take a look at the new NHS Covid-19 vaccination card


Every Briton will be given a Covid-19 vaccination card showing they received the sting and asked to keep it with them at all times. The Tory MPs are blaming him today Government of getting an immunity pass through stealth.

State Department Secretary James Cleverly said millions of people in the UK will "unlock" their lives by having the coronavirus stabbed with a card to prove it.

When asked if the cards were passes with a different name, Mr Cleverly repeatedly evaded the question, but told Sky News that he hoped they weren't used as a "ticket" for entry to pubs, restaurants or places Sports events would be needed. He added, "Ultimately, it's about opening up people's lives and the economy."

MailOnline asked NHS England, which is managing the vaccine rollout, if it is mandatory to wear the card. You still have to answer.

Former Tory Secretary David Jones believes the government needs to make it clear that UK cards cannot be used to prevent people from living their lives – and if necessary, Boris Johnson should legislate to to ensure this. He told MailOnline: 'It should be a completely free choice (to carry a card). I think people should be vaccinated, but I don't think they should be influenced by whether they can go to a restaurant or a theater. That is the danger of such things. You can tell people you can't come in if you don't show your card. I don't think that's right. & # 39;

One way to legislate would be to make it illegal to discriminate against someone because of their vaccination. Or ministers could clarify in the existing coronavirus regulations that companies do not have the right to see the cards as they are medical records.

Today official pictures show what card patients are given to prove they received the push. It is printed out in any case and in large bold type on the front it warns those with a note: "Make sure you keep this index card in your purse or wallet."

Cabinet minister Michael Gove has rejected any plans for a UK “vaccination pass” – but companies, including Qantas airline, have already announced that they will give preference to anyone who has had a sting and can prove it.

Critics fear the cards represent a major step towards the immunity passport, which the government has vehemently rejected. Questions about the need for the Covid-19 card also remain unanswered if, for example, it is not part of the standard flu vaccination.

Others said vaccination card evidence was easy to forge, and one reviewer said, “No photo, no details. What could possibly go wrong? & # 39 ;. Another tweeted, “It doesn't take long for you to be ready to shop on the internet for self-completion. In the truest sense of the word just a cardboard card, no security or anything! & # 39;

The concerns about the new ID were as follows:

  • Health chiefs announce that the UK will receive four million doses of vaccine by the end of the year when the first batch arrives at the London hospital with the first bumps starting tomorrow. A mass vaccination program used to treat those 80+, nursing home workers, and high risk people NHS Staff will be working at 50 NHS hubs, specialty jab centers and GP clinics across the UK tomorrow morning.
  • The government plans to bring the vaccine to the UK in case Brexit causes delays in ports from Jan. 1.
  • The Rapid Covid trial begins today in 14 Scottish nursing homes, so visitors can see their loved ones in less than an hour after the negative swab result.

Michael Gove and other ministers have denied the government has any plans to issue a “vaccination record,” but the NHS has created a card that will allow people to keep a record of when they have received the sting, warning them in bold: “ Make sure you keep this index card in your purse or wallet & # 39;

Boris Johnson visited Uxbridge Police Station today with Shaun Bailey, candidate for London Mayor of Tory, and two police officers. The Prime Minister is being urged by his own MPs to prevent the card from being used to discourage people from living their lives

Boris Johnson visited Uxbridge Police Station today with Shaun Bailey, candidate for London Mayor of Tory, and two police officers. The Prime Minister is being urged by his own MPs to prevent the card from being used to discourage people from living their lives

Up to 4 million doses of the Pfizer Covid-19 vaccine are expected to be administered by the end of December

Up to 4 million doses of the Pfizer Covid-19 vaccine are expected to be administered by the end of December

A graph shows where the 50 NHS hubs, specialty jab centers, and GP clinics that will offer the vaccine next week are located

A graph shows where the 50 NHS hubs, specialty jab centers, and GP clinics that will offer the vaccine next week are located

If you haven't been contacted about the coronavirus vaccine, don't panic, health chiefs tell those over 80 as it is known that most of them won't get it until the New Year

Health bosses have advised people over the age of 80 not to panic if they haven't been contacted about the coronavirus vaccine – as it turns out that most of them won't get a sting until the beginning of the new year, when mass immunization begins .

Dozens of hospital centers will be getting vaccinations starting Tuesday on what Matt Hancock calls "V-Day." People 80+, nursing home workers and NHS workers at higher risk are at the top of the queue.

Chris Hopson, executive director of NHS Providers, said people need to "hang on fire" and be sure they haven't been forgotten even though they haven't received a letter or phone call about the vaccine.

He told the PA news agency, “I don't think people should expect anything in the next few days because the reality, as I said, is that for the great, great, great majority of people it will happen in January and February , March.

"And the only thing we don't want people to worry or worry about is," Where's my letter? "In December. & # 39;

Images have now been shared from a card that patients receive to prove they received the sting – which has been shown to be effective 95 percent of the time and offers immunity for up to six months.

The card contains space for the name of the vaccine, its lot number and the date of injection.

There's room for a second date as Pfizer's sting requires two vaccinations.

It is not yet clear whether the cards are compulsory or part of an immunity passport that has been evaluated as a solution to help the hotel industry reopen.

Michael Gove declined the idea and told Sky News: "This is not planned. I certainly have no plans to introduce vaccination records, and I don't know anyone in the government who does. & # 39;

UK Health Secretary Nadhim Zahawi said his restaurants and bars could require proof of vaccination.

He told the BBC, "I think you will likely find that restaurants, bars, cinemas and other venues, sports venues are likely to use this system as well."

Fears that people might miss out on the first wave of vaccinations because of shortages of supplies rose last week after the government announced that only 800,000 doses of the Pfizer shock had been sent to the UK.

But the NHS bosses tried yesterday to address the concerns. Saffron Cordery, the deputy CEO of NHS Providers, assured the public that the country expects "up to four million cans" by the end of December.

She told Sky & # 39; s Sophy Ridge on Sunday, “We know the first batch of 800,000 is now on its way into the country. We know that many of the 50 hospital centers across the country have already received their allocation and more are expected today. So we know this show is here.

& # 39; We expect that by the end of December only a few million, i.e. up to four million cans, will be with us. This broadcast and distribution is really well on its way now. & # 39;

Hundreds of young people tried to enter Harrods in Knightsbridge, London, on Saturday night and huddled outside in the streets

Hundreds of young people tried to enter Harrods in Knightsbridge, London, on Saturday night and huddled outside in the streets

High-risk NHS workers along with those over 80 and nursing home workers will be the first to get the sting when the vaccination program starts tomorrow

High-risk NHS workers along with those over 80 and nursing home workers will be the first to get the sting when the vaccination program starts tomorrow

Official figures released yesterday also showed an additional 231 people died after testing positive for Covid-19 - a 7.4 percent increase from the 215 deaths reported last Sunday

Official figures released yesterday also showed an additional 231 people died after testing positive for Covid-19 – a 7.4 percent increase from the 215 deaths reported last Sunday

The UK recorded an additional 17,272 coronaviruses yesterday - a 42 percent increase from last Sunday's total

The UK recorded an additional 17,272 coronaviruses yesterday – a 42 percent increase from last Sunday's total

LIST OF 50 HOSPITAL HUBS IN THE FIRST WAVE OF THE COVID-19 VACCINATION PROGRAM

  • Mid and South Essex NHS Foundation Trust
  • Milton Keynes University Hospital NHS Foundation Trust
  • East Suffolk and North Essex NHS Foundation Trust
  • North West Anglia NHS Foundation Trust
  • James Paget University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust
  • NHS Foundation Trust of Norfolk and Norwich University Hospitals
  • Cambridge University Hospital's NHS Foundation Trust
  • East and North Hertfordshire NHS Trust
  • Royal Free London NHS Foundation Trust
  • Guy & # 39; s and St Thomas & # 39; NHS Foundation Trust
  • Croydon Health Services NHS Trust
  • NHS Foundation Trust of St. George & # 39; s University Hospitals
  • NHS Foundation Trust of King & # 39; s College Hospital – Hill Denmark
  • NHS Foundation Trust of the King & # 39; s College Hospital – Princess Royal University Hospital
  • Walsall Healthcare NHS Trust
  • Chesterfield Royal Hospital NHS Foundation Trust
  • Sherwood Forest Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust
  • Coventry University Hospitals and Warwickshire NHS Trust
  • Royal Stoke Hospital
  • Northampton NHS Trust General Hospital
  • Derby and Burton NHS Foundation Trust University Hospitals
  • United Lincolnshire Hospitals NHS Trust
  • Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust
  • Shrewsbury and Telford Hospital NHS Trust
  • Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust
  • Integrated Care North North Cumbria NHS Foundation Trust
  • Hull University NHS Trust teaching hospitals
  • The NHS Foundation Trust of Newcastle Upon Tyne Hospitals
  • Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust
  • South Tees NHS Trust
  • Wirral University Teaching Hospital
  • Liverpool University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust
  • Countess of the Chester Hospital NHS Foundation Trust
  • Salford Royal NHS Foundation Trust
  • Stockport NHS Foundation Trust
  • Blackpool Teaching Hospital
  • Lancashire Teaching Hospital Trust
  • NHS Foundation Trust from Frimley Health – Wexham Park Hospital
  • Oxford University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust
  • NHS Foundation Trust of East Kent Hospitals – William Harvey Hospital
  • Brighton University Hospitals and Sussex NHS Trust – Royal Sussex County Hospital
  • Portsmouth University Hospitals Trust
  • Royal Surrey NHS Foundation Trust
  • Yeovil District Hospital NHS Foundation Trust
  • Dorset County Hospital's NHS Foundation Trust
  • Royal Cornwall Hospitals NHS Trust
  • University Hospitals Plymouth NHS Trust
  • Great Western Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust
  • Gloucestershire Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust
  • North Bristol NHS Trust

Croydon University Hospital yesterday was one of the first 50 hospital centers to receive the highly anticipated vaccine, which will be ready for use by patients tomorrow.

As the boxes were being unloaded from trucks into the special warehouse, the medical director of NHS England said it was "a really exciting moment".

Professor Stephen Powis said the NHS was prepared to start vaccinating those most in need from Tuesday, but warned it would be a marathon, not a sprint.

& # 39; This is a really exciting moment. NHS workers across the country at vaccination centers like this one we are working on today have worked tirelessly to get us ready to start vaccinating on Tuesday, ”he said. told Sky News, "This feels like the beginning of the end, but of course it's a marathon, not a sprint, and it will be many months before we vaccinate who needs to be vaccinated." The first batches of the Covid vaccine arrived at some UK hospitals yesterday, raising hopes that an end to the pandemic is in sight.

Up to 50 hospital centers will start vaccinating tomorrow – referred to as "V-Day" by Health Secretary Matt Hancock.

The first doses of the vaccine, given the green light by the Medicines and Health Products Regulatory Authority (MHRA) last week, will be prioritized for those most at risk.

Older patients aged 80 and over who come to the hospital on other appointments are likely to come first, followed by nursing home and NHS staff.

Britain has ordered 40 million doses, enough to vaccinate 20 million people, and is counting on up to 10 million doses by the end of the year.

General practitioners in England are due to begin staffing COVID-19 vaccination centers by December 14.

Pictures show the arrival of a range of vaccines at Croydon University Hospital in south London over the weekend. Similar scenes take place across the country.

There it was unpacked by a pharmacy technician with protective equipment designed for the cold storage requirements of -70 ° C.

After the final quality controls, the batch is placed in a freezer to ensure it can be kept at the correct temperature until used.

The distribution of the vaccine in the UK is carried out by Public Health England and the NHS in England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland through systems specially adapted to those used for national vaccination programs.

Patients 80 years and older who come to the hospital on other appointments are likely to come first, followed by nursing home staff. Vaccinated patients are given a card with their details to prove they had it.

General practitioners in England are scheduled to begin staffing vaccination centers by December 14th. Britain has ordered 40 million doses of Pfizer, enough to vaccinate 20 million people.

The arrival of a batch at Croydon Hospital in South London this weekend was captured by a photographer.

It was unpacked by a pharmacy technician with protective gear designed for the -70 ° C storage requirements.

After the final quality controls, the batch was placed in a freezer to maintain the low temperature.

NHS Providers' Saffron Cordery said shipments of the first 800,000 cans are in full swing. "We estimate there will be up to four million doses in the country by the end of December," she added.

The deliveries came as the drug agency chief said the vaccine was "very safe, effective and will help the country turn a corner".

Dr. June Raine, chairman of the board of directors of the MHRA, said heavy vaccine intake was key to removing animal restrictions.

She compared the Pfizer vaccine to a flu shot or vacation shots, adding that there should be "real confidence" how rigorously it was tested.

A graphic shows how the Pfizer push works by penetrating the patient's cells and causing the immune system to produce antibodies and activate T cells ready to destroy those infected with coronavirus

A graphic shows how the Pfizer push works by penetrating the patient's cells and causing the immune system to produce antibodies and activate T cells ready to destroy those infected with coronavirus

A graphic shows the order of priority in which the vaccine is introduced, starting with residents in nursing homes

A graphic shows the order of priority in which the vaccine is introduced, starting with residents in nursing homes

Dr. Raine, who appeared on the BBC's Andrew Marr Show, said it was "critically important" that those eligible receive the vaccination to "help fight this terrible disease."

She said, “I really want to emphasize that the highest standards of control, safety, effectiveness and quality have been met – international standards. Therefore, there should be real confidence in the severity of our consent.

“In addition, our Commission for Medicinal Products for Human Use has also checked all the data so there should be no doubt that this is a very safe and highly effective vaccine. It'll help us turn the corner. & # 39;

Saffron Cordery of NHS Providers, which represents hospitals, said delivery of the first cans was in full swing.

She said, “Many of the hospital centers have received their allocation of 800,000 and we estimate there will be up to 4 million doses in the country by the end of December.

She added: “It is important that people wait to be contacted by the NHS to get their vaccine. All hospital centers with local partners are already conducting a rigorous, large-scale exercise to identify and contact people who come first. This will help keep the process going as smoothly as possible. & # 39;

HOW DOES PFIZER'S COVID VACCINE WORK? AND IS IT SAFE?

What kind of vaccine is it?

The sting is known as a messenger RNA (mRNA) vaccine.

Traditional vaccines are made using weakened forms of the virus, but mRNAs only use the virus' genetic code.

An mRNA vaccine is injected into the body, where it enters the cells and prompts them to produce antigens. These antigens are recognized by the immune system and prepare it to fight the coronavirus.

What are the benefits of this type of vaccine?

No actual virus is needed to make an mRNA vaccine. This means that the speed at which it can be made is accelerated dramatically. As a result, mRNA vaccines have been touted as a potentially quick fix to new infectious disease outbreaks.

In theory, they can also be modified relatively quickly if, for example, a virus develops mutations and begins to change. mRNA vaccines are also cheaper to make than traditional vaccines, although both will play important roles in fighting Covid-19.

Where is the vaccine made?

Pfizer's butt is manufactured at the company's facility in Belgium and at separate locations in the USA.

BioNTech – the other pharmaceutical company involved in the vaccine – has two production facilities in Germany, where cans are expected to be produced from New Year onwards.

Is it safe?

All vaccines are rigorously tested and monitored by experienced regulators.

Some believe that mRNA vaccines are safer for the patient as they do not rely on any element of the virus to be injected into the body. mRNA vaccines were tested in the laboratory and on animals before moving to human studies.

The human mRNA vaccine trials, involving tens of thousands of people around the world, have been underway since early 2020 to show whether they are safe and effective.

Pfizer will continue to collect data on safety and long-term outcomes from participants for two years.

It doesn't take long to make vaccines?

In the past, it took years, sometimes decades, to make a vaccine.

Traditionally, vaccine development involves various processes, including the design and development phases, followed by clinical trials that need self-approval before they even begin.

How did that come about so quickly?

In the studies for a Covid-19 vaccine, things are a little different. A process that normally takes years has been cut down to months.

While the early design and development phases look similar, the clinical trial phases overlap rather than occur sequentially.

And drug companies started manufacturing before final approval was given – and ran the risk that they might be forced to scrap their work.

The new way of working allows regulators around the world to start reviewing scientific data earlier than before.

But doesn't that mean security is at risk?

Although some phases of the clinical trial process were parallel rather than sequential, the safety checks were still the same as for any new drug.

The Regulatory Authority for Medicines and Health Products (MHRA) has adopted the term "safety is our catchphrase".

The regulatory authorities have announced that they will "strictly assess" the data and evidence submitted regarding the safety, quality and effectiveness of the vaccine.

In most clinical trials, safety issues are usually identified in the first two to three months – a period that has already passed for most vaccine front-runners.

How did the regulators act so quickly?

The regulators have carried out ongoing reviews, which means they have been given access to the data as the scientists work, rather than going through tons of information at the end of the studies.

A rolling review of vaccine data began a few months ago.

This means regulators can start reviewing scientific data earlier than before, which in turn means the approval process can be accelerated. Regulators sometimes have thousands of pages of information to go through with a fine tooth comb – which understandably takes time.

As soon as all the data available on the vaccine are available, the MHRA experts will carefully and scientifically review the safety, quality and effectiveness data – how they protect people from Covid-19 and what level of protection they offer.

Once this is done, advice will be sought from the government's independent advisory body, the Commission for Medicinal Products for Human Use (CHM).

What data would the regulatory authority have looked at?

The information provided to the MHRA includes what the vaccine contains, how it works in the body, how well it works, what side effects it has and who it is for.

This data must include the results of all animal and human clinical studies, manufacturing and quality controls, batch production consistency, and review of the final product specification.

The factories that manufacture the vaccines are also inspected before a license can be granted to ensure that the product supplied is of the same consistently high standard.

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