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First recordings of giant pandas mating in the wild reveal the animal's purple courtship ritual


For the first time, filmmakers have captured footage of giant pandas mating in the wild.

A crew who shot an episode of the PBS series Nature followed the gentle giants in China's Qinling Mountains for three years to witness the rare commercials.

Two men are shown in a clip from "Pandas: Born to Be Wild" in an aggressive stalemate, but the woman doesn't care either and walks away.

The males' hostile routine is believed to trigger ovulation in women, which explains why natural matings are so rare in zoos.

A week later the woman relented and was seen copulating with one of the challengers.

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Filmmakers for the PBS series Nature captured what is believed to be the first courtship ritual and the mating of giant pandas in the wild.

Working with scientists and park rangers, the Nature crew captured the first recorded conflict between two men in an episode that aired on PBS on Wednesday.

Up in a bamboo tree a woman watches who is gaining her favor.

Female pandas are only fertile for a few days, so competition between men is intense.

"You have never seen anything like it", the narrator proclaims.

(embed) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BWchkf7dwVM (/ embed)

While the two men hit the ground, a woman watches from a tree. Pandas are only fertile for a few days, so competition between men is intense

While the two men hit the ground, a woman watches from a tree. Pandas are only fertile for a few days, so competition between men is intense

A week later, the camera finds the female again, this time with the younger challenger. He sniffs, licks the floor and drools. She got into oestrus and is finally ready, ”the narrator announces

A week later, the camera finds the female again, this time with the younger challenger. He sniffs, licks the floor and drools. She got into oestrus and is finally ready, ”the narrator announces

A man emerges victorious, but the female is not in the mood and he backs away.

Both suitors follow her and wait for her to get into the heat.

Their competition is long and surprisingly aggressive, with fights, violent roars, and scent markings.

And sometimes the men even hold the female "hostage".

Only a week later does the camera find the woman again, this time alone with the younger challenger.

Pandas are usually solitary animals who stick to an area. But during their mating season, between the end of winter and the beginning of spring, they will travel for miles a day in search of a mate

Pandas are usually solitary animals who stick to an area. But during their mating season, between the end of winter and the beginning of spring, they will travel for miles a day in search of a mate

"The youth won," says the narrator. He sniffs, licks the floor and drools. She came into oestrus and finally finished. Then they mate in a discreet corner as you can imagine. & # 39;

Pandas are usually solitary animals who stick to an area. But during their mating season, between the end of winter and the beginning of spring, they will travel for miles a day in search of a mate.

They also get surprisingly vocal when it comes time to band together.

"Your calls would reflect the whole mountain," filmmaker Jacky Poon told PBS. "This is one of the main ways we track pandas in the wild by following their calls."

Earlier this year, two pandas successfully mated for the first time at a Hong Kong zoo.

In April, Le Le and Ying Ying, residents of Hong Kong's Ocean Park Zoo, "succeeded in mating naturally for the first time," the zoo said in a statement.

Due to the pandemic, Ocean Park has been closed to the public since the end of January.

Le Le and Ying Ying arrived at the park in 2007 and had not mated since trying to reunite the pair in 2010.

In April, Le Le and Ying Ying, residents of Hong Kong's Ocean Park Zoo, "succeeded in mating naturally for the first time," the zoo said in a statement.

In April, Le Le and Ying Ying, residents of Hong Kong's Ocean Park Zoo, "succeeded in mating naturally for the first time," the zoo said in a statement.

Previous attempts by zookeepers to mate naturally had been unsuccessful.

"Since Ying Ying and Le Le first arrived in Hong Kong in 2007 and tried to mate naturally since 2010, they have unfortunately only succeeded this year," said Michael Boos, director of zoos and conservation.

At the end of March, the zoo staff noticed that Ying Ying, the woman, was spending more time in the water, while Le Le began to leave scent marks in his habitat and search the area for Ying Ying's scent.

"The successful natural mating process is extremely exciting for all of us today because the likelihood of pregnancy through natural mating is higher than through artificial insemination," said Boos.

The zoo is now closely monitoring Ying Ying's body and behavior changes to see if she could be pregnant.

WHAT DO WE KNOW ABOUT GIANT PANDAS?

While its numbers are slowly increasing, the giant panda remains one of the rarest and most endangered bears in the world.

An estimated 1,864 giant pandas live in the wild and 548 in zoos and breeding centers around the world.

Experts aren't sure what age giant pandas can reach in the wild, but the oldest panda ever raised in captivity was 38 years old.

A wild panda's diet is 99 percent bamboo and the rest one percent small rodents.

Four-month-old baby giant panda Xiang Xiang will have a physical exam on October 10, 2017 at Ueno Zoo in Tokyo

Four-month-old baby giant panda Xiang Xiang will have a physical exam on October 10, 2017 at Ueno Zoo in Tokyo

Giant pandas need to consume around 10 to 20 kilograms of bamboo a day to get the nutrients they need.

They are about three to four feet tall when standing on all four legs.

Boys do not open their eyes until they are six to eight weeks old and cannot move independently until they are three months old.

A newborn panda is about the size of a piece of butter, or about 1/900 the size of its mother.

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