ENTERTAINMENT

Fifty Northern Tory MPs call for a "roadmap out of lockdown": Boris Johnson faces a "red wall" revolt


WHAT ARE THE THREE RULES? AND WHEN DO YOU COME INTO FORCE?

Warrington will be subject to the third tier lockout rules from midnight.

Nottingham City, Gedling, Broxtowe and Rushcliffe will be part of the third stage from 12:01 a.m. on Thursday.

NEW RULES

  • People are not allowed to come into contact with anyone they do not live with or with whom they have not formed a bubble of support, indoors, in private gardens, or in most of the outdoor locations where hospitality and ticketed events are held.
  • People are not allowed to socialize in a group of more than six people in an outdoor public area such as a park or beach, in the country, in a public garden or in a sports venue.
  • All pubs and bars must close unless they are serving essential meals. Alcohol may only be served next to such a meal.

OTHER GUIDELINES

  • People should try to avoid traveling outside of very high alert or entering an area with very high alert except for work, education or welfare, or to travel through on an extended trip.
  • Residents should avoid staying in any other part of the UK and others should avoid staying in a very alarmed area.

More than 50 Conservative MPs in constituencies of the "Red Wall" are demanding from the Prime Minister an economic plan after the coronavirus for the north of England and a "Roadmap out of Lockdown".

A letter to Boris Johnson of the Northern Research Group – a newly formed alliance of Tory MPs led by former Northern Powerhouse Minister Jake Berry – outlines the group's demands, including a tailored stimulus plan for the north.

Mr Berry says the virus could widen the north-south divide and "send the north in the opposite direction". His group is now calling on Mr Johnson to “level” the north – something the Prime Minister claimed he would after making conservative gains in the region in the general election.

The group calls on the government to prioritize major infrastructure projects and accelerate job creation in the north.

It happens that around 8 million people in England will have to live under the toughest Covid-19 restrictions by the end of the week after officials confirmed four separate parts of Nottinghamshire were put into lockdown after three days of crunch talks from midnight onwards the third tier will be transferred to the government.

Officials have agreed to take draconian measures in Nottingham City, Gedling, Broxtowe and Rushcliffe to shut down the gearbox. This means that all pubs and bars must close unless they serve meals while people are prohibited from mingling with someone they do not live with indoors or in private gardens and beer gardens.

Northern Research Group MPs describe how severe local restrictions are affecting the region and how the local economy will continue to suffer. Many lose their jobs and face the prospect of closing their shops.

Rep for Rossendale and Darwen, Mr Berry, said: “The virus has clearly exposed the profound structural and systemic handicaps of our communities and threatens to widen the disparities between north and south.

“Our constituents have been hardest hit by this virus as they have lost many jobs, businesses and livelihoods. Never before has there been a more pertinent and urgent political and economic case to aid those living in the north.

"Instead of pushing our shared ambitions, the cost of COVID and the virus itself threatens to turn the north around."

The upcoming increased restrictions – expected to be officially announced tomorrow by No 10 – were announced just hours after ministers finally confirmed that Warrington will be subject to the toughest of measures from midnight tonight after being closed in cases under 60 had come a rise. The Minister of Health today insisted it was "time to take action" and warned again that "sacrifices must be made" to combat the disease.

Nottingham East MP Nadia Whittome responded to the city's Tier 3 restrictions, saying in a statement it was "regrettable that Nottingham is going to adopt Tier 3 restrictions later this week".

She added, “This situation was totally preventable if we had put in place an adequate track and trace system and the government had given people financial assistance to stay at home rather than encouraging re-opening of jobs and social spaces before then this system was fully functional.

"Nottingham City Council understands that the government's proposals are insufficient to cover the costs of protecting health, livelihoods and businesses in Nottingham."

The Labor MP added: “While we wait for further details and clarity on the proposals, the government urgently needs to change its stance on the Nottingham MPs and sit with us at the table.

"I will continue to struggle to find a financial solution that adequately reflects the needs of our city and my constituents."

In other coronavirus developments in the UK today:

  • There was confusion over the UK's self-isolation rules after Boris Johnson and Nicola Sturgeon suggested that England and Scotland might have different quarantine policies.
  • Welsh "trolley police" aroused anger after women in Tesco were told they could not buy sanitary towels because they were not strictly necessary.
  • Rishi Sunak is under increasing pressure to turn around plans to reintroduce VAT on sales of personal protective equipment (PPE) as Labor referred to the move as a "mask tax".
  • Older people who have been given the Oxford University vaccine will get protection against Covid-19, according to study results, as Matt Hancock claimed the first doses could be ready before Christmas.
  • The UK coronavirus outbreak has slowed significantly since the beginning of the month, according to a MailOnline analysis that indicated the latest series of lockdown restrictions are successfully flattening the second curve.
  • The UK is now seeing more Covid-19 deaths per day than the US for the first time since June.

Greater Manchester Conservative MP for Hazel Grove William Wragg said the coronavirus has only "exacerbated" the need for "good business for the north". "On a pan-northern basis, we can work with the government to create prosperity and opportunity for our constituents and to rebuild better after COVID," he said.

A letter to Boris Johnson of the Northern Research Group – a newly formed alliance of Tory MPs led by former Northern Powerhouse Minister Jake Berry (left) – outlines the group's demands, including a tailored stimulus plan for the North . Greater Manchester Conservative MP William Wragg (right) said the coronavirus has only "exacerbated" the need for "good business for the north". "On a pan-northern basis, we can work with the government to create prosperity and opportunity for our constituents and to rebuild better after COVID," he said

Prime Minister Boris Johnson checks the hospital meal at the Royal Berkshire Hospital in Reading on October 26th

Prime Minister Boris Johnson checks the hospital meal at the Royal Berkshire Hospital in Reading on October 26th

NOTTINGHAM CITY: Department of Health statistics show how the number of Covid-19 cases diagnosed daily in Nottingham has decreased since the beginning of the month. The numbers refer to the date the sample was taken - not the time it was recorded as positive. Because of this, the numbers are delayed by a few days

NOTTINGHAM CITY: Department of Health statistics show how the number of Covid-19 cases diagnosed daily in Nottingham has decreased since the beginning of the month. The numbers refer to the date the sample was taken – not the time it was recorded as positive. Because of this, the numbers are delayed by a few days

GEDLING: Daily infections appear stable in Gedling, a district of Nottinghamshire that is home to around 120,000 people. The cases increased in late September and increased rapidly until about two weeks ago

GEDLING: Daily infections appear stable in Gedling, a district of Nottinghamshire that is home to around 120,000 people. The cases increased in late September and increased rapidly until about two weeks ago

BROXTOWE: Infections also appear to have stabilized in Broxtowe, another Nottinghamshire borough that locals say will face the toughest Tier 3 restrictions

BROXTOWE: Infections also appear to have stabilized in Broxtowe, another Nottinghamshire borough that locals say will face the toughest Tier 3 restrictions

RUSHCLIFFE: The Rushcliffe cases also seem to have stabilized. It has been reported that the other parts of Nottinghamshire - Ashfield, Mansfield, Newark, and Sherwood and Bassetlaw - will remain in Tier Two

RUSHCLIFFE: The Rushcliffe cases also seem to have stabilized. It has been reported that the other parts of Nottinghamshire – Ashfield, Mansfield, Newark, and Sherwood and Bassetlaw – will remain in Tier Two

Former cabinet ministers including David Davis and Esther McVey were among the signatories. Others included prominent back benches Philip Davies and Ben Bradley. The Northern Research Group is led by former Northern Powerhouse Minister Jake Berry.

THE CONSERVATIVE MPs WHO SIGNED THE LETTER JOHNSON

Pictured: signing the letter to Boris Johnson

Pictured: signing the letter to Boris Johnson

  • Aaron Bell
  • Alexander Stafford
  • Andrew Percy
  • Antony Higginbotham
  • Ben Bradley
  • Chris Green
  • Christian Wakeford
  • Craig Whittaker
  • David Davis
  • David Jones
  • David Morris
  • David Mundell
  • Esther McVey
  • Imran Ahmad Khan
  • James Daly
  • James Davies
  • James Grundy
  • Jason McCartney
  • John Stevenson
  • Julian Sturdy
  • Karl McCartney
  • Kieran Mullen
  • Lee Anderson
  • Mark Eastwood
  • Mark Jenkinson
  • Mark Logan
  • Mark Menzies
  • Mary Robinson
  • Nick Fletcher
  • Paul Howell
  • Paul Maynard
  • Peter Gibson
  • Philip Davies
  • Robbie Moore
  • Robert Goodwill
  • Robert Largan
  • Sara Britcliffe
  • Simon Clarke
  • Simon Fell
  • William Wragg

The names of another 14 MPs were edited.

He said the government must honor its commitments made in the last election to level the northern communities.

Hazel Grove Greater Manchester Conservative MP William Wragg told Sky News that the coronavirus has only "exacerbated" the need for "good business for the north".

"On a pan-northern basis, we can work with the government to create prosperity and opportunity for our constituents and to rebuild better after COVID," he said.

The Northern Research Group (NRG) wants Mr. Johnson to put in place a "clear roadmap" for the lockdown and develop a stimulus plan for the north.

They also urge the government to prioritize major infrastructure projects and accelerate job creation in the region.

A north-south divide has emerged with the government's coronavirus tier system as all of the areas with the strictest restrictions are in the north and midlands.

Mr Berry, who represents Rossendale and Darwen, said: “Our party's return to government in December was won on the back of hard-working people in constituencies like ours who have supported the Conservatives for the first time in a generation, and have supported that Promise they won't be forgotten.

"We cannot forget that we must meet our commitments in these elections to strengthen the northern communities and create opportunities in our region."

He said the north had "seen levels of disruption unparalleled in other parts of the country" due to the pandemic.

He added, “The virus has exposed with significant relief the profound structural and systemic drawbacks our communities are facing and threatens to widen the gaps between North and South even further.

“Our constituents have been hardest hit by this virus as they have lost many jobs, businesses and livelihoods.

“Never before has there been a more pertinent and urgent political and economic case to support the people of the north.

"Instead of fueling our common ambitions, the cost of Covid and the virus itself threatens to turn the North in the opposite direction."

Around 40 Conservative MPs have signed the letter publicly, another 14 have their names edited.

Mr Johnson won an 80-seat majority in last year's general election and turned many traditional Labor constituencies – what made up the so-called Red Wall – blue.

Some MPs have raised concerns that these newly won seats could be returned to Labor in the next election if the government fails to deliver on its promise to "level" the country.

Bridget Phillipson, Shadow Treasury Secretary, commented: “Even Boris Johnson's own MPs know he cannot be trusted to keep his promises.

& # 39; The government has treated the local communities with contempt.

"The decision not to extend free school meals is the clearest sign that the Conservatives have the wrong priorities and are not on the side of British families."

It came as health chiefs today announced an additional 20,890 Covid-19 cases across the UK, up just 11 percent from 18,804 last Monday, as there is growing evidence that the second wave is gradually waning. Health ministry chiefs also declared 102 more laboratory-confirmed deaths, up 27.5 percent from the 80 recorded around that time last week.

There are currently more than 7 million people living under tier-three locks in England, including Liverpool, Greater Manchester, Lancashire and much of South Yorkshire – but that number will climb to around 8 million by Thursday. Another 19 million are in the second tier, which means they are not allowed to meet their friends and family indoors.

England has so far opposed calls by Number 10's Scientific Advisory Board, SAGE, to introduce a "breaker" in fears that it could cripple an already fragile economy brought about by the UK's first blanket lockdown, Boris Johnson imposed on March 23, lies in ruins.

WHAT ARE THE RULES FOR DIFFERENT LOCKDOWN ANIMALS?

LEVEL ONE

Tier 1 restrictions reflect the restrictions already in place across England.

These include the rule of six, a curfew at 10 p.m., group sports that can only be played outdoors, and a maximum of 15 guests at wedding ceremonies.

ANIMAL TWO

Level two restrictions mean that people are prohibited from interacting with anyone outside their household or assisting bubbles indoors

Two households are allowed to meet in a private garden and in public outdoor areas, provided that the rule of six and social distancing are observed.

Traders – such as plumbers and electricians – can still go to work in a household.

ANIMAL THREE

Restaurants can be open, but only until 10 p.m.

Pubs and bars must be closed unless they also function as a restaurant.

This definition extends to pubs that sell "large" meals that, like restaurants, are allowed to remain open, but only serve alcohol to people eating a meal.

Locals are advised to leave their areas only for important travel such as work, education, or health and to return before the end of the day.

Overnight stays by people outside these "high-risk areas" are also prohibited. Households are not allowed to mix indoors or outdoors.

But it does mean England is still the unusual. Wales is currently in a 17 day embargo. But the rules of the nation have turned into further chaos today after ministers insisted that people cannot buy essential goods in supermarkets – but only if they are essential. Supermarkets have chosen to tape up shelves with normal goods to make sure customers obey the rules, block entire aisles or cover them with plastic.

Scotland has been exposed to a "breaker" for a fortnight. In large parts of the country, bars and restaurants are no longer allowed to serve alcohol and are closed. And Northern Ireland is currently in the middle of a four-week lockdown.

Matt Hancock today refused to rule out a tougher set of Tier 4 requirements after reports that another tier is being considered to combat England's surge in infections. And the health minister claimed the areas would need to show evidence that their infection rate is "dropping", especially among those over 60, before they could be excluded from the toughest of measures.

Last week, officials announced that Warrington – home to around 210,000 people – will be added to the growing list of Tier 3 regions starting this Thursday after Council Chairs approved a £ 6 million government aid package to save jobs and protect livelihoods and support testing.

Local bosses warned that the cases were "persistently high" and that the tougher measures were "necessary and proportionate". The Warrington Council announced this weekend that the date had been postponed to "urgently cut the number of cases" – despite government statistics suggesting the city's Covid-19 outbreak is not rising anytime soon like in old times.

Mr. Hancock confirmed the decision today. He said, “Warrington infection rates are rising and we have agreed with local executives that it is time to take action. I know these new measures will mean that the people of Warrington will have to make sacrifices, and I want to thank each and every one of them for realizing the gravity of the situation and for abiding by the rules. & # 39;

The stricter rules for the Nottingham, Broxtowe, Gedling and Rushcliffe council areas will come into force on Thursday. Details of the measures are expected to be announced on Tuesday.

Local health officials failed to reach an agreement with ministers last week and only accepted stricter measures for the four counties across the county during the crunch talks held tonight.

In a joint statement, Nottingham City Council and Nottinghamshire County Council said: "The Nottingham, Broxtowe, Gedling and Rushcliffe Council areas will be moved to tier three Covid-19 restrictions following talks between the government and council presidents.

'These measures will take effect one minute after midnight on Thursday October 29th. The new measures expire in 28 days and are closely monitored by the government and local partners.

& # 39; The unified package of measures for these specific areas will be officially announced tomorrow (Tuesday, October 27) and it has been agreed to sustainably reduce infection rates, in particular to protect our vulnerable residents, the NHS and social services.

ARE OUTBREAKS IN NOTTINGHAMSHIRE AND WARRINGTON REALLY GETTING WORSE?

NOTTINGHAM

Falls on October 18th: 154

Seven-day rolling average: 232.9

% Change in the previous week:: Low 40.2% (389.7)

Weekly infection rate: 540.1

GEDLING

Falls on October 18th: 39

Seven-day rolling average: 68.7

% Change in the previous week:: Above 1.9% (67.4)

Weekly infection rate: 413.1

BROXTOWE

Falls on October 18th: 41

Seven-day rolling average: 58

% Change in the previous week:: Above 14.6% (50.6)

Weekly infection rate: 350.8

RUSHCLIFFE

Falls on October 18th: 42

Seven-day rolling average: 64.7

% Change in the previous week:: Above 3.7% (62.4)

Weekly infection rate: 389.3

NEWARK AND SHERWOOD

Falls on October 18th: 19

Seven-day rolling average: 33.6

% Change in the previous week:: Above 8.4% (31)

Weekly infection rate: 181.3

MANSFIELD

Falls on October 18th: 38

Seven-day rolling average: 43.9

% Change in the previous week:: Above 55.1% (28.3)

Weekly infection rate: 258.9

ASHFIELD

Falls on October 18th: 36

Seven-day rolling average: 53.7

% Change in the previous week:: Above 49.6% (35.9)

Weekly infection rate: 288.5

BASSETLAW

Falls on October 18th: 35

Seven-day rolling average: 45.4

% Change in the previous week:: Above 74.6% (26)

Weekly infection rate: 256.3

WARRINGTON

Falls on October 18th: 77

Seven-day rolling average: 113.1

% Change in the previous week:: Above 9.9% (102.9)

Weekly infection rate: 360.9

Source: Department of Health data based on sample data – when the positive test was performed as opposed to when it was recorded in the system

“A support package, similar to that provided in other parts of the country, has been agreed to help residents and businesses that will be affected by the new restrictions.

"Further specific measures for these areas of Nottingham and Nottinghamshire will be announced tomorrow."

This came after both local leaders in Gedling and MPs in town criticized Number 10's lack of communication about the stricter restrictions and complained that they had not been invited to crucial talks.

Nottingham South Labor MP Lilian Greenwood said on Twitter that it was clear "the city of Nottingham and these three counties will definitely move into stage three" before the announcement was made.

Before making the decision, she told the Nottingham Post: & # 39;I share the frustration of my constituents that the government has been saying for over a week that they want to include Nottingham and parts of Nottinghamshire in Stage Three.

“And they only started holding detailed discussions with the local councils on Thursday. The expectation was clear that there would be an announcement on Monday and that new measures would come on Wednesday. & # 39;

Nottinghamshire MPs had not agreed on financial aid to bail out businesses at risk of bankruptcy from tightened restrictions, despite talks last week about imposing a ban on indoor socializing to combat the spread of the virus started.

Labor MP for Nottingham East Nadia Whittome alleged that local officials were asked to sign last-minute agreements to enter Stage Three with no clear information on how much money they were spending to protect jobs and Company will be preserved.

Health Department statistics show the Nottingham outbreak continues to shrink after peaking in early October. While the falls in Gedling, Broxtowe and Rushcliffe are increasing, but much more slowly than before.

The decision to put an additional 680,000 people under Tier 3 lockdown came just hours after ministers finally confirmed Warrington would face the harsher conditions from midnight tonight.

The city council announced on Saturday that it would upgrade to level three from Tuesday instead of Thursday as originally planned.

The website states, "Warrington is currently defined as a local high risk (Tier 2) COVID alert but will be switched to" very high "risk (Tier 3) on Tuesday, October 27th at 12:01 am."

Initial discussions suggested that Warrington's new restrictions could take effect from Thursday. However, it was put forward based on the need to urgently reduce the number of coronavirus cases in the city and protect hospital capacity.

Local Government Secretary Robert Jenrick confirmed the decision this afternoon, saying, “I thank the local leaders in Warrington for the productive discussions we have had to get the virus under control in the area as soon as possible.

“I am delighted that we have reached an agreement that will ensure that action is taken swiftly in line with public health recommendations. I recognize the huge impact this will have on the area and the sacrifices that will have to be made. For this reason, we have agreed on a comprehensive support package for the local population, companies and the council.

& # 39; The restrictions we have jointly agreed only apply for as long as they are absolutely necessary. They will be checked together in 28 days.

"The government is working closely with local leaders as we work together to address this challenge for the benefit of all of Warrington."

Warrington was moved to the third tier after officials – including those from the Joint Biosecurity Center and Mr Hancock – analyzed the available data, including the incidence, test positivity and growth rate of the virus.

Council Chairman Russ Bowden said: “The decision for Warrington to enter Stage Three on Tuesday is the necessary and proportionate decision.

“We know our case numbers remain stubbornly high in Warrington, but more importantly, the number of hospital admissions.

"The disturbing and grim reality is that there are more people in the hospital, more people in intensive care beds and more people infected with the virus, and we must do everything we can to get this under control."

It was announced last week that city councils had received a £ 5.9 million support package to help them get into the toughest category. £ 1.68 million was allocated to public health – including protection, testing and enforcement – and an additional £ 4.2 million to business and employment support.

The council for Warrington said Saturday that it would move to level three starting Tuesday

The council for Warrington said Saturday that it would move to level three starting Tuesday

ENGLAND COULD HAVE TOUGHER UNDER CLAIMS 10 HARDER

The Health Secretary refused to deny that plans were being made to mimic Nicola Sturgeon's crackdown in Scotland and introduce a new top tier 4

The Health Secretary refused to deny that plans were being made to mimic Nicola Sturgeon's crackdown in Scotland and introduce a new top tier 4

Matt Hancock feared new tighter coronavirus lockdowns in the worst-hit parts of England that could close restaurants and shops in a devastating blow to the economy.

The Health Secretary refused to deny that plans were being made to mimic Nicola Sturgeon's crackdown in Scotland and introduce a new top tier 4.

Currently, the English tier system ends at three, allowing restaurants and shops to continue trading while pubs that do not serve food will be closed.

When asked about reports that there are plans to partially copy Scotland, which has Tier 4 at the top of a five-tier system, Hancock told BBC Breakfast: “We have said all along that we are not taking anything off the table.

“Nevertheless, we saw that the increase in the number of cases slowed down somewhat.

“The problem is that it is still rising, and while it is still rising we have to act to get it under control.

"We're not ruling anything out, but right now we're working on the three-tier system that is slowing the growth of this virus but has not stalled that curve."

At the weekend, South Yorkshire was the youngest region to fall under the highest level of control after Liverpool City, Greater Manchester and Lancashire.

According to the Department of Health, almost 900,000 cases of Covid-19 have been confirmed since the virus was first discovered on British soil in January.

Today's 20,890 new cases mean the average number of daily infections within seven days is 21,926 – up from 21,628 yesterday and 17,649 a week ago.

It also means the UK has confirmed around 230 cases per 100,000 people in the past week – more than ten times the current quarantine threshold for travelers returning from abroad.

However, a catalog of official statistics suggests that the second wave is already slowing.

Today's analysis by MailOnline found that weekly Covid-19 cases across the UK are currently only increasing by 14 percent. Infections nearly doubled every seven to eight days in September, sparking widespread fears that the country had entered a second wave after a break in transmission in the summer.

Health Department data released today also showed an additional 102 laboratory-confirmed deaths across the UK. The total number of victims who died within 28 days of testing positive rose to 44,998.

However, the number of deaths is still rising rapidly. The average number of daily deaths is currently 182 – up from 122 last Monday. That number had dropped below 10 before schools and universities returned in early September.

It can take several weeks for infected patients to become seriously ill and die, which means the daily death toll does not decrease for at least fourteen days.

When asked about the criteria for exiting the third tier, Hancock told BBC Radio 4's Today program: “First of all, the most important thing is that the case rate needs to decrease, and especially the number of cases in those over 60 because that is the number likely to translate into hospital admissions and, unfortunately, deaths. & # 39;

Mr Hancock also suggested that a vaccine would not provide an escape route from social restrictions until next year.

He asked today if there would be a vaccine launch this year and said, “Well, I'm not ruling that out, but that's not my central expectation.

& # 39; The vaccination program is making good progress. The leading candidates with whom we are in very close contact.

"Based on my main expectation, I would expect most of the roll-out to take place in the first half of next year."

Amid discussions between councils and the government over escalating the stages in England, the government has come under increasing criticism for failing the NHS testing and tracking service, which should be key to fighting the disease.

The high-ranking Conservative MP Sir Bernard Jenkin called on the weekend to dismiss the head of the organization – Tory peer Baroness Harding – and replace it with a military commander.

He was backed by Labor who said Lady Harding's position had become "untenable" after the latest weekly numbers showed that less than 60 percent of contacts from people who tested positive for Covid-19 had been traced and solicited to isolate yourself.

TESCO INSISTS TAMPONS ARE AVAILABLE TO ALL CUSTOMERS IN WALES

A Twitter user posted a picture of her Tesco showing the products that have been locked up by members of the public

A Twitter user posted a picture of her Tesco showing the products that have been locked up by members of the public

The Welsh "trolley police" caused anger this morning after women in Tesco were told they couldn't buy sanitary towels – because they weren't strictly necessary.

Details of the exceptional restriction were tweeted online by the supermarket following a complaint from a shopper known only as Katie from the Cardiff store.

It sparked a brief disagreement between Tesco and the Welsh government when the shop accused the authority – while claiming they were false.

Katie had said, “Can you explain why I was told today that I can't buy period pads because I'm sure they are important for women? !!! But I can buy alcohol, it doesn't make sense. & # 39;

In a now-deleted post, Tesco responded, “We understand how frustrating these changes will be for our Welsh customers. However, the Welsh government has directed us not to sell these items for the duration of the fire lockdown. & # 39;

It prompted the agency to step in and make a concise statement that the supermarket, whose location is not known, was wrong. The Welsh Government insisted: “This is wrong – products from the time are essential.

“Supermarkets can still sell items that can be sold in pharmacies. Only the sale of essential items during the break is intended to prevent more time than necessary from being spent in stores. It shouldn't prevent you from accessing the items you need. & # 39;

Tesco apologized this morning, saying pictures of barriers near the items were actually only in place after a police incident that had nothing to do with the new rules.

But Mr Hancock came to the Test and Trace Tsar's defense and told BBC Breakfast that she was "of course" the right person for the job.

However, it turns out that Covid-19 Task Force officials are exploring the possibility of relaxing the rules for people supposed to self-isolate after coming into contact with someone who is positive for the disease because of their short stay Was tested in compliance at home.

Ministers confirmed they are trying to cut the time people quarantine at home from 14 days to 10 days to a week.

Scientists have publicly criticized the change under discussion, arguing that it could allow infected people to mingle with others.

Paul Hunter, a professor of medicine at the University of East Anglia, told the Today program, “If other things were the same it would certainly increase the risk of transmission as the average incubation time for the disease is about five to six days and only about 85 to 90 percent of people actually developed sick within seven days.

"So if you cut that incubation period shorter, 10 percent, maybe 15 percent of the people who were contagious would eventually be allowed to go out in public again."

However, Mr Hancock referred to France as an example of introducing a similar measure. He added, “So it's not about the compliance issue. It is about the overall clinical assessment of the time required for isolation.

"Of course I would rather be in isolation for as short a time as possible as it affects people's lives, but it has to be safe."

Meanwhile, the Welsh government has announced it is reviewing a controversial ban on the sale of non-essential items by supermarkets during a two-week “fire break” lockdown that began Friday.

Welsh Health Minister Vaughan Gething told Sky News the purpose of the review: “We want clarity on the principle that this can happen even when there are really exceptional circumstances where someone needs something that would not otherwise be essential. & # 39;

Mr Hancock also raised concerns about new tighter coronavirus lockdowns in the worst-hit parts of England that could close restaurants and shops in a devastating blow to the economy.

The Health Secretary refused to deny that plans were being made to mimic Nicola Sturgeon's crackdown in Scotland and introduce a new top tier 4.

Currently, the English tier system ends at three, allowing restaurants and shops to continue trading while pubs that do not serve food will be closed.

When asked about reports that there are plans to partially copy Scotland, which has Tier 4 at the top of a five-tier system, Hancock told BBC Breakfast: “We have said all along that we are not taking anything off the table.

“Nevertheless, we saw that the increase in the number of cases slowed down somewhat.

“The problem is that it is still rising, and while it is still rising we have to act to get it under control.

Mr Hancock's comments came after the Welsh "trolley police" sparked anger this morning after women in Tesco were told they couldn't buy sanitary towels because they weren't strictly necessary.

Details of the extraordinary restriction were tweeted online by the grocery store following a complaint from a shopper known only as Katie.

It sparked a brief disagreement between Tesco and the Welsh government when the shop accused the authority – while claiming they were false.

Katie had said, “Can you explain why I was told today that I can't buy period pads because I'm sure they are important for women? !!! But I can buy alcohol, it doesn't make sense. & # 39;

In a now-deleted post, Tesco responded, “We understand how frustrating these changes will be for our Welsh customers. However, the Welsh government has instructed us not to sell these items for the duration of the fire lockdown. & # 39;

It prompted the agency to step in and make a concise statement that the supermarket, whose location is not known, was wrong. The Welsh Government insisted: “This is wrong – products from the time are essential.

“Supermarkets can still sell items that can be sold in pharmacies. Only the sale of essential items during the break is intended to prevent more time than necessary from being spent in stores. It shouldn't prevent you from accessing the items you need. & # 39;

Tesco apologized this morning, saying pictures of barriers near the items were actually only in place after a police incident that had nothing to do with the new rules.

How the Covid-19 outbreak slowed in the UK: The rate of growth has fallen from doubling weekly to just 14% in seven days as Matt Hancock claims the problem is still bigger (and even the crisis in Tier 3 Liverpool is shrinking )

The UK coronavirus outbreak has slowed significantly since the beginning of the month, suggesting the second series of lockdown restrictions are successfully flattening the outbreak's second curve.

Infections nearly doubled every seven to eight days in September, sparking widespread fears that the country had entered a second wave after a break in transmission in the summer when the national lockdown was lifted.

Due to the worrying numbers, senior government science and medical staff warned the disease was increasing exponentially and forecast a doomsday scenario of 50,000 cases per day by mid-October. Ministers tightened social freedoms at the national level – by introducing curfew at 6 a.m. and 10 p.m. – and launched the controversial three-tier lockdown system that plunged millions into even tougher curbs in Covid-19 hotspot areas.

There has been much debate over whether the new measures have been effective, but analysis of the official data by MailOnline shows that weekly Covid-19 cases across the UK are currently only increasing by 14 percent, averaging 18,465 cases per day. And in Merseyside – the only region closed long enough for the curbs to take effect – infections are already on the decline.

Despite the promising statistics, Health Secretary Matt Hancock confirmed today that a fourth tier lockdown is in sight if the current three-category system doesn't push cases down. While acknowledging that the virus had "slowed down a bit," he said, "The problem is that it is still increasing, and while it is still increasing we need to act to get it under control." Mr Hancock said he would "not rule out anything" on the prospect of a new fourth bracket of restrictions that could result in restaurants and non-essential businesses having to close.

Public Health England figures show that the average number of daily cases in seven days increased from 3,676 in the week ending September 18 to 6,301 by September 25 (71 percent). The following week it rose at a similar rate, rising to 10,470 by September 29. The seven-day moving average is considered to be the most accurate method of assessing Covid-19 outbreaks because it takes into account the daily variation in infections.

Analysis of the official data by MailOnline shows that weekly Covid-19 cases across the UK are currently only increasing by 14 percent, with an average of 18,465 cases per day. For comparison: In September the infections almost doubled every seven to eight days

Analysis of the official data by MailOnline shows that weekly Covid-19 cases across the UK are currently only increasing by 14 percent, with an average of 18,465 cases per day. For comparison: In September the infections almost doubled every seven to eight days

In the city of Liverpool, the average daily infections fell from 460.3 on October 11 to 387.1 on October 18, the last recording period

In the city of Liverpool, the average daily infections fell from 460.3 on October 11 to 387.1 on October 18, the last recording period

In Knowsley, daily infections also fell from 154.1 to 132.6 at the same time, suggesting that Tier 3 lockdown rules are already in place

In Knowsley, daily infections have also dropped from 154.1 to 132.6 at the same time, suggesting that Tier 3 lockdown rules are already in place

In the Sefton metropolitan area, infections have decreased slightly in the past week, falling from 178 to 176.4

In the Sefton metropolitan area, infections have decreased slightly in the past week, falling from 178 to 176.4

According to an analysis of the PHE numbers, the average number of cases in Haltons fell from 64 to 63.3 in seven days

According to an analysis of the PHE numbers, the average number of cases in Haltons fell from 64 to 63.3 in seven days

NICOLA STURGEON SAYS QUARANTINE WILL STAY IN SCOTLAND FOR TWO WEEKS

Ms. Sturgeon, the first Scottish minister, said today she has "no plans" to change the 14-day deadline and her top doctor suggested there is currently no evidence.

Ms. Sturgeon, the first Scottish minister, said today she has "no plans" to change the 14-day deadline and her top doctor suggested there is currently no evidence.

Confusion reigned today over the UK's self-isolation rules after Boris Johnson and Nicola Sturgeon suggested that England and Scotland might have different quarantine rules.

Downing Street confirmed this afternoon that it is investigating whether current rules requiring those who come in contact with a coronavirus carrier to quarantine for 14 days could be relaxed.

It came after Matt Hancock raised hopes that the time frame could be shortened to seven days – indicating that France already has a lower timescale.

At her daily press conference today, Ms. Sturgeon, the Scottish First Minister, said she had "no plans" to change the 14-day period and her top medics suggested there is currently no evidence.

Scotland's National Clinical Director Jason Leitch said he was not aware of any scientific advice in any part of the UK to help reduce it from the current 14 days or 10 days from the date a person's symptoms end .

Mr. Leitch said, "We have no plans with the current clinical advice to change this in any way."

Ms. Sturgeon added: “We currently have no plans to reduce the self-isolation period. We keep an eye on all of this. We don't want people to live under the strictest restrictions for longer than is strictly necessary. & # 39;

However, between October 9 and October 16 – the most recent snapshot – the average number of cases rose only 14 percent in seven days, from 16,196 to 18,465. For comparison: the infections increased by 26.6 percent the week before. It suggests the rate at which infections increase is halving every week.

In the Liverpool metropolitan area, which became the first area to enter a Tier 3 lockdown on October 14, infections have declined in four of six boroughs in the past week. And in the two cases where cases are still increasing, the rate at which they are increasing has slowed down.

The numbers are available on the government Coronavirus dashboard. They are based on the date of the sample, which is how many coronavirus samples taken that day were positive.

The sample date is due to a delay in the analysis of the tests of about five days and even longer on weekends, which is why the numbers can only accurately reflect outbreaks in cities up to October 16.

Despite all the signs that the latest lockdown rules are working, Mr Hancock feared new tighter restrictions in the worst-hit parts of England today that could close restaurants and shops in a devastating blow to the economy.

The Minister of Health refused to deny that plans were being made to mimic Nicola Sturgeon's crackdown in Scotland and introduce a new top tier 4 system. Currently, the UK tier system ends at three, allowing restaurants and shops to continue trading while pubs-bars will not serve food.

When asked about reports that there are plans to partially copy Scotland, which has Tier 4 at the top of a five-tier system, Hancock told BBC Breakfast: “We have said all along that we are not taking anything off the table.

“Nevertheless, we saw that the increase in the number of cases slowed down somewhat. The problem is that it is still rising, and while it is still rising we need to act to get it under control.

"We're not ruling anything out, but right now we're working on the three-tier system that is slowing the growth of this virus but has not stalled that curve."

Swaths of the Northwest and Yorkshire have been plunged into third tier local locks in recent weeks, including Liverpool, Manchester, Lancashire and Sheffield. Pubs and bars have been closed and various households have been banned.

However, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland already have much tougher lockdowns in place to stop cases from rising. Officials in Whitehall are now to consider adding a fourth tier to the existing government system for England, which rates local alert levels as medium, high and very high.

The government was previously accused of jumping the gun with new lockdown restrictions before previously imposed rules come into effect.

Analysis of the official numbers shows that four out of six regions in Tier Three Merseyside are already experiencing cases.

St. Helens and the Wirral are the two boroughs where falls are still increasing, but the rate at which they are increasing has slowed down. For example, infections at Wirral rose from just 136 to 137.3 (1 percent) in the week ending October 18. This is markedly different from the 31 percent increase between September 27 and October, when the daily cases rose from 101.9 to 134.3

St. Helens and the Wirral are the two boroughs where falls are still increasing, but the rate at which they are increasing has slowed down. In the week ending October 18, for example, the proportion of Wirral infections rose from just 136 to 137.3 (1 percent). This is markedly different from the 31 percent increase between September 27 and October, when the daily cases rose from 101.9 to 134.3

In St. Helens, cases rose 5 percent in the past week, compared with 10 percent in the seven days before

In St. Helens, cases rose 5 percent in the past week from 10 percent in the seven days prior

The NHS used half of critical care beds like other hard-hit European nations during the spring crisis, while claims that those over 60 were "left untreated during the height of the pandemic."

The NHS used half as many intensive care beds as France, Belgium and other hard-hit European nations during the Covid 19 crisis in the spring. This emerges from numbers that came in due to shock claims that the healthcare system was overwhelming with refusing care to elderly patients to prevent it.

A maximum of 50 infected patients were on ventilators for every million people in mid-April. This was the height of the pandemic when the British were told to stay home to protect the NHS.

In Belgium, where Covid-19 deaths were at a rate similar to the UK at the time, the figure was around 111 per million people. France treated 104 people per million in intensive care that same week. The number hit 74 in the Netherlands, which has had a similar number of coronavirus cases as in the UK.

The numbers come from controversial claims that the NHS rationed beds during the height of the Covid-19 pandemic and refused critical care to elderly coronavirus patients, even though hospitals were nowhere near overcrowded.

People over 80 and some over 60s were not receiving potentially life-saving treatment as health officials feared the NHS was reportedly overwhelmed. It is alleged that documents identified as a "triage tool" at the request of English chief physician Professor Chris Whitty were used to prevent elderly Covid-19 patients from being ventilated in the intensive care unit.

In a research, the Sunday Times said the tool was used to create a "score" for patients based on their age, frailty and illness. Under the original system, people over 80 were automatically excluded from intensive care based on their age. Even those over 60, who are considered frail and have pre-existing health problems such as heart disease, could have crossed the threshold to intensive care.

NHS chiefs hit back on the allegations, saying they were false while "deeply insulting NHS doctors, nurses and paramedics". Officials say that while early work was done on a national critical care "triage tool" it was "not completed" and never exhibited.

In the city of Liverpool, the average daily infections fell from 460.3 on October 11 to 387.1 on October 18, the last recording period. At the same time, daily infections in Knowsley fell from 154.1 to 132.6.

In Sefton and Halton, infections fell slightly over the past week, falling from 178 to 176.4 and 64 to 63.3, respectively. It suggests that Tier 3 measures are already in place, although they didn't go into effect until October 14th.

St. Helens and the Wirral are the two boroughs where falls are still increasing, but the rate at which they are increasing has slowed down. For example, infections at Wirral rose from just 136 to 137.3 (1 percent) in the week ending October 18. This is markedly different from the 31 percent increase between September 27 and October, when the daily cases rose from 101.9 to 134.3. In St. Helens, cases rose 5 percent in the past week, compared to 10 percent in the seven days before.

According to The I, sources in Whitehall expect it will be clear by mid-November whether existing restrictions will help reduce the daily number of cases.

Wales closed a "ceasefire" on Friday with all non-essential retail, leisure and hospitality businesses closed until November 9th.

Similar to the March statewide lockdown, Welsh residents have been told they can only leave the home for a limited number of reasons, such as: For reasons of movement, maintenance or the purchase of basic foodstuffs.

A dispute has broken out over the sale of essentials after supermarkets were seen blocking aisles and covering up some products.

First Minister Mark Drakeford tweeted on Saturday: “We are going to review how the weekend went with the supermarkets and make sure common sense is being used.

“Supermarkets can sell anything that can be sold in another store that doesn't have to close. In the meantime, please only leave the house if you need it. & # 39;

Meanwhile, experts have said that Scotland's 16-day breaker, which has been extended for an additional week, had little impact on declining coronavirus infections.

Nicola Sturgeon's own scientific advisors warned Thursday that it was "too early to assess the effects of the October 9 restrictions on transmission".

The government has told local executives that Tier 3 regions must reduce social contact by 60 percent.

Five Army and Navy environmental health officers trained in 'outbreak management' were deployed in Liverpool on Friday when the British Army was drafted in support of Tier 3 lockdowns.

They were Task: Identify clusters of local infections, control outbreaks and take action against companies that do not comply with the Covid-19 rules.

It is assumed that more teams will be transferred to other risk areas in the coming weeks. Liverpool Labor Council Paul Brant told The I that he expected Tier 3 rules to have some impact on Covid infection rates.

He added: “We fear Sage is right to say that getting the R below 1 is not enough. Even if it falls below 1, the actual case values ​​have now risen rapidly.

“We know from the first wave that infection rates can rise very quickly and they fall fairly slowly. So we could be in a situation where R has decreased but absolute numbers have not.

& # 39; Unless the numbers improve significantly, we will no doubt re-examine the exact same questions to see if further restrictions will be needed to bring the levels down. That is the argument for a brief, sharp shock. & # 39;

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