ENTERTAINMENT

Ferries are blocked by protesting fishing boats in the Whitehall war game as they prepare for a no-deal


Ferries faced a blockade of protesting fishing boats, nursing homes closed and a gang of bandits hijacked a vaccine show in a no-deal Brexit table exercise.

After the Brexit war game Operation Capstone, medication was also battled in hospitals battling increasing Covid-19 cases stuck in bumper traffic.

EU negotiator Michel Barnier warned yesterday that there were only a few hours left to achieve a breakthrough.

Fishing increasingly seems to be the main remaining obstacle. Emmanuel Macron insists that the French fleets continue to have access to British waters after Brexit.

Operation Capstone, which was conducted across all government offices last week, envisioned the Dover motorway at a standstill caused by a non-committal disruption.

Ferries faced a blockade of protesting fishing boats, nursing homes closed and a gang of bandits hijacked a vaccine show in a no-deal Brexit table exercise. Pictured: Ferries in Dover this month

After the Brexit war game Operation Capstone, medication was also battled in hospitals battling increasing Covid-19 cases stuck in bumper traffic. Pictured: trucks lined up in Dover this month

After the Brexit war game Operation Capstone, medication was also battled in hospitals battling increasing Covid-19 cases stuck in bumper traffic. Pictured: trucks lined up in Dover this month

Trucks line up to enter Dover port in Kent on Saturday as Christmas shopping and uncertainty over Brexit create chaos

Trucks line up to enter Dover port in Kent on Saturday as Christmas shopping and uncertainty over Brexit create chaos

EU negotiator Michel Barnier warned yesterday that there were only a few hours left to achieve a breakthrough. Pictured: trucks at Dover today

EU negotiator Michel Barnier warned yesterday that there were only a few hours left to achieve a breakthrough. Pictured: trucks at Dover today

In the test, a criminal gang attempted to hijack an import of vaccines, which also saw mass protests in the country – with both Brexiteers and Remainers getting hot.

In this scenario, a large care home provider also closed its doors due to a devalued pound and a blockade on hiring staff from EU member states, reports The Times.

Two storms that led to mass floods and an explosion in Gibraltar in the north of England.

Fishing seems increasingly to be the main remaining barrier to an agreement with Emmanuel Macron. She insists that the French fleets will continue to have access to British waters after Brexit. Pictured: trucks at Dover today

Fishing seems increasingly to be the main remaining barrier to an agreement with Emmanuel Macron. She insists that the French fleets will continue to have access to British waters after Brexit. Pictured: trucks at Dover today

Earlier this week, Boris Johnson appealed to the EU to "understand" the Brexit requirements for fishing rights - admitting that no deal will be "difficult". Pictured: a huge amount of trucks queuing in Dover today

Earlier this week, Boris Johnson appealed to the EU to "understand" the Brexit requirements for fishing rights – admitting that no deal will be "difficult". Pictured: a huge amount of trucks queuing in Dover today

Freight wagons were seen disembarking ferries in Dover port today amid uncertainty about Brexit persists

Freight wagons were seen disembarking ferries in Dover port today amid uncertainty about Brexit persists

The Prime Minister warned that there was still a "gap that needs to be closed" between the EU and the UK and made it clear that Brussels needs to "come to the table" to find a way. Pictured: a winding line of trucks pulling into Dover today

The Prime Minister warned that there was still a "gap that needs to be closed" between the EU and the UK and made it clear that Brussels needs to "come to the table" to find a way. Pictured: a winding line of trucks pulling into Dover today

The Prime Minister has accepted that the breakdown of talks and a return to WTO terms would be "difficult at first" from December 31st - but sent a bullish message that the country would still "thrive mightily". Pictured: trucks at Dover today

The Prime Minister has accepted that the breakdown of talks and a return to WTO terms would be "difficult at first" from December 31st – but sent a bullish message that the country would still "thrive mightily". Pictured: trucks at Dover today

But even with the string of catastrophic events, "the system worked," a source revealed.

They said: & # 39; The work of the Brexit XO committee all these months means we have contingency plans for absolutely everything.

"This has been stress-tested to within an inch of its life. We're ready for a no-deal."

The committee is responsible for preparing for life after Brexit.

Operation Capstone, which was conducted across all government offices last week, envisioned the Dover motorway at a standstill caused by a non-committal disruption. Pictured: Truck queues on the A20 this month

Operation Capstone, which was conducted across all government offices last week, envisioned the Dover motorway at a standstill caused by a non-committal disruption. Pictured: Truck queues on the A20 this month

Earlier this week, Boris Johnson appealed to the EU to "understand" the Brexit requirements for fishing rights – admitting that no deal will be "difficult".

The Prime Minister warned that there was still a "gap that needs to be closed" between the two sides and made it clear that Brussels needed to "come to the table" to find a way.

He accepted that the breakdown of talks and a return to WTO terms would be "difficult at first" from December 31st – but delivered a bullish message that the country would still "thrive mightily".

The comments on a visit to Bolton came after Michel Barnier warned that there were only a few hours left to break through.

In the test, a criminal gang tried to hijack an import of vaccines (file picture), during which mass protests also covered the country - with both Brexiteers and Remainers being heated

In the test, a criminal gang tried to hijack an import of vaccines (file picture), during which mass protests also covered the country – with both Brexiteers and Remainers being heated

The bloc's chief negotiator told the European Parliament that the talks had reached the "moment of truth" after nearly a year of desperate arguments – and with less than a fortnight to ratify an agreement.

However, he warned that the road to an agreement was "very narrow". Downing Street called the EU's stance "unreasonable" and insisted that despite some progress, no deal was the most likely outcome.

Fishing seems increasingly to be the biggest remaining obstacle. Mr Johnson reportedly joked to No. 10 officials that the British would "eat fish for breakfast, lunch and dinner" after the December 31 transition period.

Boris Johnson (pictured right on a visit to Bolton this week) reportedly joked to No. 10 officials that the British will "eat fish for breakfast, lunch and dinner" after the transition period on December 31st

Boris Johnson (pictured right on a visit to Bolton this week) reportedly joked to No. 10 officials that the British will "eat fish for breakfast, lunch and dinner" after the transition period on December 31st

Michel Barnier informed the European Parliament that after almost a year of desperate debate, the talks had reached the "moment of truth" - and less than two weeks to ratify an agreement.

Michel Barnier informed the European Parliament that after almost a year of desperate debate, the talks had reached the "moment of truth" – and less than two weeks to ratify an agreement.

The President of the EU Commission, Ms. von der Leyen (pictured this week), is expected to speak to Mr. Johnson again in the next 48 hours

The President of the EU Commission, Ms. von der Leyen (pictured this week), is expected to speak to Mr. Johnson again in the next 48 hours

What are the sticking points in the Brexit talks?

FISHING

The UK has insisted that it regain control of its coastal waters from the end of the transition period.

However, the EU called for its fleets to maintain their previous access levels – with Emmanuel Macron under particular pressure from the French fishing industry.

First, the UK said it would reclaim 80 percent of EU quotas from January 1.

However, Brussels suggested restoring just 18 percent.

The two sides are believed to be near a "landing zone" that has a transition period of perhaps five or seven years. However, there is still no agreement.

LEVEL PLAY FIELD

The EU has insisted that the UK commit to a level playing field to ensure that businesses on the continent are not undercut by introducing lower environmental standards and regulations.

State aid has emerged as a particular problem, especially as the coronavirus is making parts of the economy unprofitable.

However, the UK says it needs to regain sovereign powers to make rules, even though it has no plans to lower standards or distort competition by subsidizing the private sector.

It seemed that this area was on the verge of being resolved before France reportedly set a number of additional conditions, including huge penalties in the form of tariffs for breaking the rules.

While the UK is happy with the "non-regression" – which means that current standards are accepted as a basis – it has rejected calls for future compliance with the bloc's rules.

Michel Barnier told EU ambassadors this week that the UK is now ready to accept the need for a "compensation mechanism" for rules that could resolve the dispute.

GUIDE

Getting a deal done and who decides whether to break rules has been a focus from the start.

The exemption from the European Court of Justice was one of the greatest demands made by Brexiter in the EU referendum.

But Brussels has insisted on maintaining control of governance and insisting on harsh fines and punitive tariffs for violations.

The governance problem is closely related to that of "a level playing field", with a breakthrough in the latter likely to pave the way for a breakthrough in the former.

During a visit to an OpenReach facility yesterday, Mr Johnson emphasized that the public had voted to control their own laws and waters in the EU referendum.

"No sane government will agree to a treaty in which these two basic things are not as good as everything else," he said.

“Our door is open, we will keep talking, but I have to say that things look difficult.

"There is a loophole that needs to be filled, the UK has done a lot to help and we hope that our EU friends will see meaning and come to the table with something for themselves because that is where we really are."

He acknowledged that difficult days would be ahead in the short term if the transition period ended on December 31 without a trade deal.

“Yes, it may be difficult at first, but as I have said many times before, this country will thrive in all conditions and under all conditions, and I think we just have to get through this period and see all the opportunities this country has to offer will open in 2021, ”he said.

Speaking to MEPs in Brussels yesterday, Barnier said he had returned straight from the session to make a "last-ditch effort" to break the impasse with Britain's Lord Frost.

& # 39; It is the moment of truth. We have very little time, just a few hours, to work these negotiations through in a useful way if we want this agreement to enter into force on January 1st, ”he said.

"There is a possibility of reaching an agreement, but the road to such an agreement is very narrow."

Lord Frost said: “The situation in our talks with the EU this evening is very serious. Progress seems blocked and time is running out. & # 39;

In a phone call yesterday evening, the Prime Minister warned the President of the European Commission, Ursula von der Leyen, that the negotiations were "now in a serious situation".

"The time is very short and it looks very likely that an agreement cannot be reached until the EU's position changes significantly," he said.

Downing Street said Mr Johnson had stressed that the UK could not accept a situation where it was the only sovereign country in the world that was unable to control access to its own waters for an extended period of time, and with Fisheries quotas are confronted, which severely disadvantaged its own industry ”.

Brussels is believed to be pushing for a transition period of eight years, which would mean the UK would not regain full control of its precious fishing grounds until 2029. British negotiators had previously offered three years.

Number 10 said Mr Johnson told Ms von der Leyen: "The EU's position in this area is simply not sensible and if there is an agreement it will have to be postponed significantly."

Mr Barnier said yesterday: “We are asking for no more or less than a balance between rights and obligations and reciprocity, access to our markets and access to our waters and vice versa, no more and no less.

'It is also evident that this is not an agreement that we will sign at any cost or at any cost.

“I think I've always been open with you and open and sincere. I cannot say what will come during this final round of negotiations. We have to be prepared for any eventuality. & # 39;

Lord Frost (pictured yesterday) has been drawn into talks in Brussels this week as efforts to break the impasse reach a critical moment

Lord Frost (pictured yesterday) has been drawn into talks in Brussels this week as efforts to break the impasse reach a critical moment

In her statement last night, Ms von der Leyen said that "significant progress has been made on many issues" but that "large differences still need to be bridged, particularly with regard to fisheries".

The question of what should happen if the two sides want to change their standards for labor, the environment and government subsidies in the future – known as "a level playing field" – is nearing completion.

However, UK negotiators are still pushing against Brussels' request to exempt the European Commission from subsidy schemes.

(tagsToTranslate) Dailymail (t) Nachrichten (t) Brexit (t) Coronavirus (t) Michel Barnier (t) Emmanuel Macron